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Pinterest Pins Fully Occupied San Francisco Building

The current Bay Area tech-company office boom appears set to squeeze yet another swath of San Francisco citizens.

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Per a report in the Chronicle, Pinterest – which moved into the city in 2012 – has set its sights on larger digs in the Showplace Square Design District. The four-story SFDC campus building is currently fully occupied:

Dozens of tenants in the San Francisco Design Center building at 2 Henry Adams St. face likely eviction if the landlord is successful in obtaining the approvals needed to convert the 311,000-square-foot building into Pinterest’s headquarters.

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When Working, Henry Blodget Prefers to Stand

BusinessInsiderLogoAs Business Insider prepares to launch this fall its seventh international site – Business Insider UK – Guardian U.S. business correspondent Dominic Rushe caught up with CEO Henry Blodget in New York. Rushe’s article leads off with an intriguing, HB work habits reminder:

His desk is easy to spot in the open newsroom. It’s raised so he can spend the day working on his feet. The desks on either side are raised too. “That’s peer pressure for you,” he says.

He decided to stop sitting after reading articles on BI’s website about the health hazards. “More Terrifying Facts About How Sitting Will Kill You,” reads one. “ARE YOU SITTING DOWN? Watch Out! Your Job May Be Literally Killing You,” reads another.

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Time Inc. and Meredith Merger Rumor Returns

Now that Time Inc. is on its own, the rumor that the publishing house and Meredith Corporation will merge is popping up once again. According to The Street, Meredith might acquire Time Inc. as soon as next year:

Meredith could buy Time in the fourth quarter of 2015, Citi analyst Jason Bazinet predicted. The deal is not likely to occur before then because of the tax-free nature of the Tiime spin-off, the analyst believes. Time shareholders would probably receive $28 per share in a takeover and would have 40%-48% of Meredith’s equity following the deal.

The Time Inc./Meredith talks began last February. Despite plenty of discussions, the deal ultimately fell through when the two sides couldn’t come to an agreement on the fate of TimeFortuneMoney and Sports Illustrated. 

Regardless of what the Citi analyst thinks, earlier this month Joe Ripp —Time Inc.’s CEO — was blunt about the idea of a Time Inc./Meredith combo. “I’ve had no conversations with Meredith and I have no plans to talk with [Meredith's CEO] Steve Lacey in the near future,” Ripp said at the time.

Media reporters please note that the phrase “near future” is open to wild and rampant speculation.

A Big Mess at Louise Blouin Media

New York Post media reporter Keith J. Kelly has been doing a great job of documenting the ongoing turmoil at Louise Blouin Media.

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His latest dispatch re-affirms payment delays faced by various domestic and foreign freelancers, and highlights two major recent defections:

Art + Auction senior editor Julie Baumgardner was working late one night when water started dripping from the ceiling, sources told Media Ink.

“The next morning the whole office was flooded, and it sat like that for weeks, as Louise would have to pay to have it cleaned,” said a source. “The staff cleaned it up, but it was there so long mold appeared everywhere, and they had to evacuate. Julie walked out in early May over the issue. She just got up and left.”

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Reuters Signs Syndication Deal with Variety

Reuters is teaming up with Variety for all its entertainment news. Reuters had previously partnered with a few different outlets for syndicated entertainment content.

The deal involves Reuters, Variety and VarietyLatino.com.

“Reuters is committed to providing our customers around the world with real-time, high impact multimedia news,” said Daniel Mandell, Reuters’ senior VP of business development, in a statement. “As a leading provider of quality entertainment news, Variety and Variety Latino are natural partners to help Reuters deliver unparalleled entertainment coverage to our clients.”

You can expect to see Variety’s editorial content popping up on Reuters starting in August.

Gawker Media ‘Kegerator’ Has Its Own Website

JoyrideKegeratorThere’s an interesting factoid in the latest bit of press for Queens-based and now bi-coastal company Joyride Coffee Distributors. According to freelance Post contributor Maridel Reyes, employees at one NYC media company have the option of making sure – before they get out of their chair – that a trip to the iced cofee “kegerator” will be worth the walk:

Joyride’s first kegerator was installed at Gawker last May — and the media company’s kept it ever since. It even maintains a website where workers can check if the keg is empty or not.

The list of media companies running on Joyride coffee is long and impressive. Besides Gawker, their product adorns the offices of Twitter, BuzzFeed and Mashable.

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Joe Ripp Rings NYSE Opening Bell

Here’s Time Inc.’s CEO, Joe Ripp, ringing the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange this morning. Have you ever watched one of these things? Here’s a quick breakdown: Everyone stands around as a bell is rung a few times, and then they clap and clap and clap. The end.

Time Inc. is now being traded as TIME. As of now, shares have dropped almost five percent, to $22.43. It’s going to be a long week.

Modern Farmer Founder Explains How She Connected the Dots

On May 29, Modern Farmer, a quarterly print magazine and website based in Hudson, New York, published the following articles:

Successful Game Developer: ‘I Owe it All to My Goats’

The Food Politics of Pokémon

These BuzzFeed-like items, suggests Business Insider technology beat writer Dylan Love, are perfect examples of how Modern Farmer has carved out content success. Founder-EIC Anne Marie Gardner and her crew are also riding high following their recent win at the 2014 National Magazine Awards. She tells Love how she came to this farm-to-table, “agricultural lifestyle” content nexus:

“I connected dots that weren’t connected before. I had covered travel, health, and beauty trends for [a magazine called] Monocle in my former life, and when you’re writing about trends, you get trained to see what’s coming.”

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Now Independent, Time Inc. to Cut 25 Percent of Editorial Costs

Time Inc. is officially its own company now, and with that, comes many questions. Is it smart to continue the print edition of Time? What about People? And if People — Time Inc.’s money maker — can’t produce, what hope do other titles have? Also, what about that $1.3 billion in debt? According to The New York Times, the publisher at least has an answer to that one — cutting editorial costs. By a lot.

Last week, Time Inc.’s execs met with editors and asked them to begin the process of cutting 25 percent of editorial spending. That means staffing cuts are coming by the bunches. “In almost every meeting with investors and employees, he [Time Inc.'s CEO Joe Ripp] reminds them that he is constantly reviewing staffing levels,” reported the Times. Hanging the hand of death over staffers is surely going to create a nice working environment.

Not that staffers are the only ones who are worried about the cuts. Ripp has told Time Inc. senior managers that it’s all on them to save their magazines. “I can’t fix it,” Ripp said, in meetings. “You have to figure out a way to fix it.” That, of course, brings up one more question — how do you make repairs with a half-empty toolbox?

Time Inc. Once Owned a Forest

Time Inc. is officially splitting off from Time Warner today, so we thought it’s the perfect moment to remind everyone that the publisher once owned a forest. Yes, as in that place with trees and grass and stuff.

According to Ad Age, in 1952, Time Inc. purchased a wooded area in Texas because executives “figured they’d benefit from owning the very trees required to print magazines like Time, Life and Fortune, and they got a kick out of the way east Texans did business.”

Of course all good things — and dumb things — eventually come to an end. In the early ’80s Time Inc.’s execs came to their senses and spun the forest product company off.

Here’s hoping the next chapter of Time Inc.’s life includes at least one more odd purchase. Perhaps a windmill?

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