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An Afternoon Dishing With Martha Stewart

martha-stewartFishbowlNY visited Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia’s test kitchen on the West Side Thursday afternoon to make chicken pot pies with Martha Stewart herself — and dish about, among other things, Season 3 of her PBS show Martha Stewart’s Cooking School, which premiered earlier this month (and will be exclusively sponsored by KitchenAid). A small group of journos and bloggers donned stylish striped aprons while listening intently to the domestic diva’s tips on stewing a whole chicken, combining it with buttery potatoes, carrots, onions, mushrooms, peas, thyme and cognac, and then layering an egg-wash-glazed puff pastry over the mixture-filled ramekins before popping them into the oven. Voilà. All the while, Stewart happily answered questions we peppered her with. Here are some of the tidbits we learned:

PBS keeps her busy. In addition to her Cooking School, Stewart is filming the third season of her other PBS show, Martha Bakes, and has just wrapped four shows in two days. She brought in the breakfast cookies she made on the show for us to nibble on while we waited for our pies to finish baking. “They’re about a pound each!” she said. No kidding. And delicious, we might add.

She gives credit where credit is due. Her test kitchen whips up around 1,000 recipes a year for the Martha Stewart Living magazines — and she credits her food editors, almost all of whom have been with her “for years,” with coming up with many of the inspired meals.

She wants to open a restaurant. “It’s so hard that life [as a restaurateur], but so fun,” she said. And the pot-pie recipe she shared that afternoon would be “the perfect lunch item.”

She likes football. Stewart isn’t cooking a Super Bowl meal — “I’m going to the Super Bowl!” she exclaimed. But if she were to prep something for game day, quesadillas and margaritas with “fresh lime juice and good tequila in sugar-rimmed glasses” would be on the menu.

More from Martha and photos from the event, after the jump.

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AFAR Conversations: Media Pros Talk Tourism

AFAR conversations panel From left to right: AFAR editor-in-chief Julia Cosgrove, Kenneth Villamil, director of product and brand development for Park Hyatt and Andaz, Jason Clampet, co-founder and head of content for Skift and Patrick Lafferty, CEO of Bartle Bogle Hegarty North America.

Younger generations of travelers want to have authentic travel experiences where they feel like locals, a trend called “experiential travel,” said panelists at AFAR Magazine‘s Conversations event last night.

“People want to feel like they’re seeing through they eyes of a native, versus the homogenized commercial travel of the past. Instead of just taking from the market, it’s about being part of it or giving back,” said Kenneth Villamil, director of brand development for Park Hyatt and Andaz Global Operations Center.

But we’re not talking about backpackers who sleep on the couch of a local family. Millennials and GenXers who have disposable income want to eat genuine local food, help build a well or haggle in the bazaar, but they still expect a comfortable place to stay at the end of the day.

“They still want a massage and a nice meal, but they want to participate in the local community or volunteer,” said Patrick Lafferty, CEO of advertising agency Bartle Bogle Hegarty North American.

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Vice’s Correspondent Confidential Reveals Journalists’ Untold Stories

There are two distinct narratives for journalists covering the same story for a long time: the story they publish, and the story they tell themselves or their friends over a beer. Producer Carrie Ching wants to reveal those untold personal stories with her new Vice web series, Correspondent Confidential, which screened last night at the Explorer’s Club on the Upper East Side. Every episode is a brief, animated tale told by a reporter, and a different artist illustrates each one.

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Time Inc.’s New Chief Content Officer on Native Advertising and TMZ

NPearlstineAt the Media Minds breakfast discussion this morning, new Time Inc. chief content officer Norman Pearlstine had some interesting things to say about media ethics in conversation with Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics & Public Policy at Harvard. Jones, who pressed Pearlstine on the issues of native advertising, wondered how the exec would approach these issues at his new gig.

“[Native advertising] varies from brand to brand,” said Pearlstine. “It’s not to suggest that some magazines have a higher or lower standard, but that they’re different. If you think about the customer needs of some of our lifestyle magazines, they’re quite different from the customer needs from Time or Fortune.”

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Norman Pearlstine on Why Editors Should Report to the Business Side

MediaMindsMedia pros gathered this morning at the Bryant Park Grill for a Media Minds discussion with Norman Pearlstine, newly installed chief content officer of Time Inc., and Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics & Public Policy at Harvard. All were glad for Cathy Gay‘s return after an unfortunate fall left the producer and founder of the series unable to attend the previous one.

It goes without saying that much of the discussion revolved around the Time Inc. spin-off and Pearlstine’s new role as chief content officer, a move that has garnered much discussion about the elimination of church and state at the publisher. He previously served as editor-in-chief of Time Inc. from 1995 to 2005, a position that has now been eliminated. “The idea of having editors report to business leaders is not all that different from what happened in 1997, when I stopped reporting to the board of Time Warner,” said Pearlstine, who then started to report to former Time Inc. CEO Don Logan.

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PR and Media Pros Gather for AirPR and talkTech Happy Hour

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An interesting mix of PR professionals and media figures converged on the Tribeca Grand last night for AirPR and talkTech‘s Happy Hour. Greg Galant, founder of Muckrack and the Shorty Awards, stopped by, along with Daily Beast editor Ellen Kampinsky, Time reporter Courtney Subramanian and Nora Bass, co-founder of the women’s media brand Vixely.

PR and digital media pros in attendance included Rebekah Iliff, director of product for AirPR, Chathri Ali, managing partner for talkTech, Rebecca Wolfe of WPP’s Dell Team, publicist Nora Wolf of Wolf PR and AirPR CEO Sharam Fouladgar-Mercer. talkTech and AirPR host networking events at least three to four times a year in New York and other cities around the country, trying to bring together PR people, journalists, techies and media strategists to discuss the changing media landscape.

Some of last night’s discussion revolved around whether traditional PR strategies still really worked. Iliff compared AirPR’s approach to more traditional public outreach strategies:

“We create our own content. Some of my posts have been shared 4,000 or 5,000 times on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter… I think we might be reaching a lot more people than traditional pitching would.”

Martha Stewart Weddings Party

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Fashionistas and top wedding professionals mingled last night at the 12th Annual Martha Stewart Weddings Bridal Fashion Week Party, a bazaar of luxury wedding goods and food. Hundreds of guests partied it up and sampled the wares of 20 different vendors in the Chelsea headquarters of Martha Stewart Living, the Starrett-Lehigh building. Petit fours from Dragonfly Cakes, cheddar bread and hush puppies from Jack’s Chedbred, marshmallows from Mitchmallows, pizza from Valducci’s and gourmet cotton candy from Spin-Spun Natural Confections helped fuel the crowd throughout the night. The already well-dressed attendees could also perfect their looks with manicures by Deborah Lippmann, Sparkly Tattoos by Glittertoos, hairbraiding by Blow and sparkly jewelry from Bauble Bar.

Spotted among the crowd were Randy Fenoli of  Say Yes to the Dress, bridal couture designer Claire Pettibone, recently married fashion designer Erin Fetherston, wedding designer Mark Ingram, New York City Ballet dancer Tiler Peck, wedding planner Preston Bailey and designer Amsale Amberra.

Click through the jump to see more pictures from the event!

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Soledad O’Brien on Diversity in the Media: ‘It’s not that hard’

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(from L to R) Soledad O’Brien, CEO of Starfish Media and Keith Lorizio, VP of U.S. sales and marketing at Microsoft

Media types gathered last night at the 40/40 club in New York to kick off MSN’s partnership with Interactive One. The event was part of an ongoing trend necessity for media companies to focus on diversity, and Microsoft is looking to do just that not only with Interactive One, but also through partnerships with Lisnr and the Marcus Graham Project.

Interactive One’s chief content officer Smokey Fontaine spoke to the crowd about how the company evolved over the years to keep in line with America’s changing demographics. “We changed our focus from being solely African American to… all of the folks who demographically and psychographically are part of the multicultural landscape.”

Why? “Companies have no choice but to serve multicultural. If you want to stay relevant, you have no choice but to serve that market. But you do have a choice whether you’ll serve that market really well.”

Census data shows that minorities will be the majority in the near future, and Pew continues to document how little change there is in terms of minorities in the newsroom. “I’ve been having the same conversation about diversity for 26 years, since I started in TV news,” Soledad O’Brien told FishbowlNY. “Sometimes, that’s really disheartening.”

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AOL CEO: At Least People Know The Name of Our Company

What do you think of when you hear the name “AOL”? Dialup? Your parents’ email? Alas, this is AOL’s brand problem. But don’t worry! At least people have heard of it!

That was AOL CEO Tim Armstrong‘s message at today’s Media Minds breakfast, where he said, “It’s incredibly expensive to implant a chip in someone’s head so they know what the name of your company is.” He shared that, up until 2006, AOL had spent $22 billion on marketing. As a result, “almost every country I go to in the world, people know AOL,” said Armstrong.

“We’re going to invest in things from a brand standpoint that human beings love. AOL is already planted in your head and [we'll] back fill it with awesome things — you’re going to love AOL again.”

Readers: Could you love AOL again? Did you ever love AOL?

Our sister site 10,000 Words has more on the event.

I Want Media’s ‘Future of Media’ Panelists Announced

Each year I Want Media offers those interested its “The Future of Media” talk, and this year’s lineup includes some heavy hitters. Panelists include Mark Thompson, CEO of The New York Times; Henry Blodget, CEO and editor of Business Insider; Cindy Jeffers, CEO and CTO of Salon Media; Jonah Peretti, CEO and founder of BuzzFeed; and Roy Sekoff, president of HuffPost Live.

If an hour-long discussion on “How the Internet and other digital media are transforming the traditional media landscape” gets you all hot and bothered (don’t be ashamed, there are no judgements here), you’re probably going to want to attend.

For more info, click through.

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