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Adam Richman on Landing ‘Man vs. Food’ and His Health Regimen

In Part II of our Media Beat interview with Adam Richman, the Travel Channel star discusses the lengths he went to in order to land the hosting gig for his staple show, Man vs. Food, and how he kept healthy and in shape during its run. One interesting tidbit Richman reveals is that he has it in his contract that there must be a gym in every hotel he stays at. View the rest of our one-one-chat below.

This and all MediabistroTV productions can also be viewed on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to check out Part III of our chat with Richman tomorrow.

Part I | Monday: Adam Richman on Bloomberg Soda Ban: ‘We Are In a Very Precarious Situation as a Society’

How To Answer Tricky Job Interview Questions

We’ve all faced those questions in interviews. You know, the ones that make you hesitate, stumble, or just plain feel like you won’t get the job if you answer them incorrectly. For example:

Why did you leave your last position?

You can blame the economy, a lack of growth opportunity, the position changing dramatically after you took it, or the functions being misrepresented during your interview. But the key point here is to be honest — not just for your conscience, but for your career. “Transparency is the best policy with these types of questions,” said Matt Tovrog, a partner at Bell Oaks Executive Search, “because a former boss can easily be contacted as a reference check.”

Read more in 7 Tricky Job Interview Questions and How to Answer Them.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Cecily von Ziegesar on the Inspiration for Gossip Girl

It was hard to miss the buzz surrounding the scandalous Gossip Girl when it debuted in 2007, and the books the television series is based on weren’t any tamer.

In mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? interview, the series’ creator Cecily von Ziegesar explained how she came up with the inspiration for those elite Upper East Side teenagers.

“I always start with something that’s real, an actual occurrence or somebody that I really know. Then, I change it so much that it’s not that anymore. But that’s always a kind of germ of where the person comes from,” she said. “I had a friend who was obsessed with Audrey Hepburn and, so, Blair is obsessed with Audrey Hepburn. But I just borrowed that characteristic from a friend. The rest of Blair’s characteristics have nothing to do with that friend.”

Click here for the full interview.

Pitch Stories, Not Resorts, To ISLANDS

As an intelligent travel magazine with eye-opening photography and bucket-list travel experiences, ISLANDS keeps true to its mission to empower readers to find what editor Eddy Patricelli calls “the last little pockets of independent cultures.” So, to land a byline, freelancers will need to offer literary tales of an exotic destination.

That means no half-baked queries on a resort or spa, Patricelli warns. Editors hate receiving a destination pitch “that smells of a Wikipedia entry” and lacks a unique, compelling and well researched angle. “You know what I mean, in that someone’s just pitching us on, ‘Oh this place has great snorkeling, great diving, great resorts,’ but there’s no story angle there for us,” he said.

For more on freelancer-friendly sections, check out How To Pitch: ISLANDS.

Pen Timely Essays For Poets & Writers

With 80 percent of its editorial content generated by freelancers, Poets & Writers deems itself ”writer-friendly.”

Freelancers can pitch almost all of the mag’s sections on everything from long-form reflections on the writing process, to news and trends, to profiles of authors whose books are about to be published. But to break in, you must be timely.

Editor Kevin Larimer told mediabistro.com, “We’re looking for a potential time peg. If you’re pitching a book that is coming out this month or even next month, you’re probably too late.”

Read more in How To Pitch: Poets & Writers.

Writers Wanted at Bloomberg Businessweek (No MBAs Required)

You’re not the only one intimidated by the Bloomberg Businessweek name. In mediabistro.com’s latest How To Pitch article, editors admit that, despite the brand’s cachet, they aren’t inundated with freelance pitches — good news if you’re looking to land a byline there.

“Ultimately we want someone to spin a really great yarn that happens to be of interest to business readers,” explained features editor Sheelah Kolhatkar.

To find out which sections are the most freelancer-friendly and for a list of all editors accepting pitches, check out How To Pitch: Bloomberg Businessweek.

Tap Into Your Southern Roots for South

Moving to the Big Apple doesn’t have to mean forgetting where you came from. So, if you’ve still got a place in your heart for Southern traditions (hold the fried chicken stereotypes, please), you could land a byline in this regional pub.

South concentrates on highlighting remarkable Southerners and any brand new establishments and trends happening in the Creative Coast. (Think that Southern belle who went on to Broadway fame or that hip, new designer from North Carolina who’s taken the fashion industry by storm.)

“The pub has an entire section dedicated to profiles on interesting Southern characters which definitely lends itself to outside ideas,” said managing editor Lauren Hunsberger. ”The characters, events, culture and stories are second to none and provide for some of the best reading in the world.”

For more on word count and which sections are open to freelancers, read How To Pitch: South.

Make The Band Of Writers at Filter

Sometimes pitching feels like auditioning for a seat in the high school cafeteria. Only the popular kids get the good bylines, right?

Not true at Filter. These  editors say all you have to do to break in is love good music and introduce yourself through email. Yep, that’s it.

“Be creative and show us who you are,” said Pat McGuire, the editor-in-chief. “You have to understand that there are so many people seeking similar positions that you have to make yourself stand out a little bit.”

McGuire added one piece of advice on getting your foot in Filter‘s door. “I have a sense of humor; everybody at Filter does. So entertain us. Make us remember you — without being unprofessional.”

To find out what to do once you have McGuire’s attention, check out How To Pitch: Filter.

The 7 Biggest Mistakes Personal Essay Writers Make

As an official judge for the Erma Bombeck Writing Competition, Joel Schwartzberg has seen his share of cringe-worthy essays. And, in his latest piece for mediabistro.com AvantGuild members, he says there were a few glaring errors that kept them from being potentially powerful stories.

“The biggest mistake essay writers make is finishing a piece at three in the morning, deciding it’s brilliant and, without getting any feedback, sending it to The New Yorker,” said Susan Shapiro, a writing professor published in The New York Times‘ “Lives” and “Modern Love” columns. ” After you write your piece, get a serious critique in a class, a writing workshop or by a tough ghost editor. Listen carefully to the criticism; then rewrite.”

Get more tips from Shapiro and other writing pros in The 7 Biggest Mistakes Personal Essay Writers Make.

Hit The Road To Publish Your Journey

Do all these balmy not-even-spring-yet temperatures have you daydreaming about vacays and road trips? Well, if your story is an interesting one, it could net you $1/word at AAA’s  exclusive publication, Journey.

Because Journey is a regional publication, editor-in-chief Nicole Meoli‘s first priority is to hire local writers to offer an insider perspective on the mag’s home turf. “The main stable of writers I work with are from Washington [state],” she said. However, she’s not opposed to working with freelancers from further away, as long as they bring locally relevant ideas to the table.

For more on breaking into the magazine’s feature well, read How To Pitch: Journey. [sub req'd]

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