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Tablets

Allure Adds Interactive Shopping to Tablet Editions

Allure is making it easier for readers to shop while they browse the magazine’s content. MediaPost reports that Allure has partnered with ShopAdvisor to add an interactive element to the fashion glossy’s tablet editions, allowing readers to purchase items from select retailers.

The ShopAdvisor feature is available in Allure’s September issue. Readers can buy products they like or save items for later. No doubt some people will enjoy how easy this makes shopping, though they might not like what it does to their bank accounts.

The shopping interactivity is especially enticing to advertisers, because they can add more products in the future and have their items pop-up in notifications that remind consumers about a certain product.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

David Ho on The Daily and Creating WSJ‘s iPad App

“Technology is easy. Journalism is hard,” says the Wall Street Journal‘s mobile and tablets editor David Ho. The Journal was one of the first major newspapers to develop an iPad app, the process of which was the toughest professional challenge Ho has undertaken. “It was more than a news-journalism-tech challenge. It felt like some crazy endurance race,” he said.

And, having gone through that process of creating a news app from scratch, Ho said he empathizes with the pressure his peers at News Corp.’s The Daily likely face.

“I think everyone involved in tablet and mobile news watches The Daily. It’s this bold experiment: a brand new news organization created from scratch. How often do you see that these days? The Daily pioneered a lot of ways to deliver news on tablets,” Ho said in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview.

“It does look like The Daily is trying to make their production process easier,” he continued. “They dropped their landscape view not long ago. That I get. Supporting two tablet rotations all the time is a lot of work. It’s tough to put out a tablet issue every day.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, David Ho, Mobile and Tablets Editor at The Wall Street Journal?

Writers Discuss Writing of New York’s Most Popular

(L to R) New York Magazine editor-in-chief Adam Moss, contributing editors Steve Fishman, Vanessa Grigoriadis, Jennifer Senior

New York and Byliner celebrated the launch of their new eBook yesterday with a live reading from three of the featured writers. “New York Magazine’s Most Popular” is the very first eBook that New York has published, and features 26 of the magazine’s most popular stories from the past five years, one of which is a book excerpt from John Heilemann and Mark Halperin’s Game Change. Web analytics were used to determine the most popular stories, and among them were Steve Fishman’s “The Madoff Tapes,” Vanessa Grigoriadis’ “Growing up Gaga” and Jennifer Senior’s “All Joy and No Fun.” These three writers read excerpts of their articles and talked about the writing process with New York editor-in-chief Adam Moss and Byliner.com editor Michael Solomon. Interestingly, Moss said that these pieces and their fellow most popular cohorts were not the ones that were most popular on a day-to-day basis. Rather, they had accumulated their popularity over time, and the content “was actually the more substantial, meatier stuff that we did.” Read more

Vogue Launches Tablet Edition

Vogue is now available digitally. Starting today, the fashion magazine can be downloaded on the Nook, Nook Color, Kindle Fire and iPad. To make the launch enticing, each platform is offering free trials and Vogue’s print and digital editions are available now for only $19.99, over 50 percent off the cover price.

The digital launch coincides with Vogue’s April issue, featuring Jennifer Lopez or J. Lo or whatever the hell she likes to be called now. In a profile by Jonathan Van Meter, Lopez reveals that she wears a diamond ring that spells, “I love me.”

Jenny From The Block, everyone!

Cosmopolitan Hits 100,000 Digital Subscriptions

People apparently love their Cosmo. The magazine claims that it has 100,000 digital subscribers, and that’s not counting sponsored digital subscriptions.

The number is impressive, especially considering the magazine asks even print subscribers to pay for digital access. Nothing, it seems, keeps readers from their Cosmo.

“A couple of years ago, the big question was what’s going to happen to magazines like Cosmo in the future,” Kate White, Cosmo’s Editor-in-Chief, told Ad Age. “There was a little bit of anxiety. What this has done is say that our content will rule and will thrive. Women want our content, and they’ll get it on a variety of platforms.”

The future will be ruled by Cosmo! Hope that’s alright with you.

The Daily’s Publisher on Year One: ‘We’ve Absolutely Met Our Expectations’

Few things have been as harshly scrutinized in the last year as The Daily. Sure, “Scream 4″ was attacked for not taking advantage of the superior talents of David Arquette, and more recently Lana Del Rey has been critiqued about 4,347 times too many, but The Daily seemed to get blasted more than anything. So how is The Little Tablet Paper That Could doing now? Its Publisher, Greg Clayman, says “just fine, thank you.”

Digiday reports that The Daily has the same reach as The Detroit Free Press or The Seattle Times, with about 250,000 monthly readers and 100,000 paid subscribers. It also continues to have the support of big-time advertisers, such as IBM and BMW and has finally worked out all of its technical issues. This, according to Clayman, is all part of the plan.

Read more

Creative Direction of Tablets Gives Publishers Pause

When designing a magazine app for a tablet, is it best for it to be simple or complicated? The answer to that question is giving companies plenty to think about. Adweek reports that while some publishing houses claimed readers want their apps pared down, others felt that would be a step in the wrong direction.

Authorities at Time and Hearst explained that the KISS principle is the best approach. Steve Sachs, Time’s Executive Vice President of Consumer Marketing and Sales, said, “Interactive elements are valuable to [readers], but they’re a secondary benefit.” Chris Wilkes, the Vice President of Hearst’s App Lab agreed, and added that if an app has too many extras they could end up annoying readers.

Scott Dadich, the Executive Director of Digital Magazine Development at Condé Nast, didn’t see it that way at all. “It’s more effort, it’s more expense, but it does bear out in engagement,” said Dadich. “Something like a GQ, seeing models on a fashion shoot, or seeing the clothes move — there’s definitely value in that.” In line with Dadich’s thinking, the highest rated apps are often those that are also thoroughly enhanced.

Read more

Hachette, Bloomberg Businessweek Publishing Steve Jobs e-Book

Hachette Book Group and Bloomberg Businessweek are teaming up on the e-book game. The first publication from the partnership is Steve Jobs: 1955-2011, available now on the Kindle and other tablets for $3.99.

According to paidContent, the e-book is merely republished content from Businessweek’s October Jobs tribute issue, so if you’ve already read that, Steve Jobs: 1955-2011 probably isn’t that intriguing.

However, the partnership might mean good things down the line, so we’re excited to hear about it.

Money Launches on Tablets

Money magazine has launched on tablet devices, including the iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, Nook and Nook Color, and Kindle Fire. Print subscribers can view the content for free, and the magazine is offering non-subscribers a 30 day free trial here.

The first download features content from the December issue (tips on where to invest, which jobs will be big next year and more) and additional tablet-only articles.

Tablet’s Future Excites Publishers

David Carey and Bob Sauerberg, the Presidents of Hearst Magazines and Condé Nast, respectively, are excited about tablets. And not because the devices allow them to watch their favorite Lady Gaga video or update their Tumblrs with inspirational quotes that annoy their followers.

Carey and Sauerberg are excited about tablets because of what lies ahead — heaps of money. Yesterday, while speaking at a magazine conference, the two men said that they expect tablets to provide significant revenue streams in the near future.

According to WWD, Carey said that Hearst should hit the $10 million mark from e-subscripitions as soon as next summer, while Sauerberg said Condé’s print and digital bundles will provide a $15 million revenue boost.

Not a bad start for companies that are just starting to figure out tablets and how readers interact with them.

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