TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Archives: November 2008

Not Your Typical Power 40 From Details

details.jpgDetails Power 40 list didn’t have the cachet of a Vanity Fair, Time or Newsweek list.

But with an anonymous Secret Service Agent, bailout czar Neel Kashkari and the Palin family leading the list, the mag makes it clear that they’re doing their list their way.

Yes, to keep up with the naysayers who whine “Where are the stars?,” Tom Cruise, Robert Downey Jr. and Live Nation CEO Michael Rapino also get named.

Pete Hamill story, ‘Yellow Handkerchief,’ Premieres In Hollywood With Stars Hovering

yellowhanderchief.jpgAn indie film that got plenty of attention in Sundance last year, “The Yellow Handkerchief,” had a Beverly Hills premiere at the WGA Theater last night with stars William Hurt, Maria Bello and producer Arthur Cohn in tow.

The film, a beautiful tone poemy love story etched by director Udayan Prasad, was a pleasant diversion from the normal shoot-em-ups in Hollywood, as producer Cohn lamented in his introduction.

He was right.

It doesn’t start off as anything but dreary. But Prasad’s slow-paced styling pays off with stellar performances from Hurt, Bello, Kristin Stewart (who is hot right now because of the phenomenal box office turn with her film “Twilight”) and newcomer Eddie Redmayne.

The unsung irony that, though based in Louisiana backwoods swamps, the story of three lonely drifters coming together comes from hard-core New York journalist Pete Hamill of all people.

Hamill didn’t attend the premiere, but we all were wondering what could possibly have inspired this piece.

Hurt dashed in and out quickly, but not before he could say hello. Ten months ago, Hurt made a surprise appearance at a screening of my film, “Running with Arnold.”

Sid Ganis, chairman of the Academy, was also in the audience.

Though it doesn’t have a domestic release date yet, producer Cohn said the piece should be opening in Japan in April.

Online Petition Urges SAG to Make a Deal

SAG_logo.pngThey’ve gotten over twelve thousand signatures so far on their online petition:

To: AMPTP & SAG:
To the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers and the Screen Actors Guild, we ask that you please reach a deal as quickly as possible. We are individuals on all sides, from actors to producers, to crew members, to the audience itself who merely want to continue to enjoy entertainment as we struggle ourselves to survive. We have no agenda, we merely want what’s best for everybody. Your actions have thus far been in concern over what’s best for you as individual unions and organizations. It’s time to consider the countless others being affected by your negligence and disregard for the last several months.

Read more

LAT and FBLA Crossover

latmarathon.png

Yeah, we’re subtle huh? Read the entire article here.

The FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning Glance

The Great Depression Wasn’t All that Bad|The Fair Must Go On|Koppel Done Discovering|Newseum Layoffs, FBDC Had It First

Craig Newmark Subscribes to The New York Times for the First Time

34142gg763.jpgCraig Newmark of Craigslist is over at that LA Times talking about the only thing any media people are talking about these days: the future of newspapers and whether there is one. Newmark seems to hew to the increasingly popular school of thought that the future of newspapers is local. But he also revealed this little interesting tidbit: he recently became a first-time subscriber to the New York Times! Apparently it all had to do with a mysterious woman named Wendy.

And basically, what I’m hearing from them is, and what I’m seeing too — I was on a panel with Dean Singleton — what people seem to want are a few sources of national news overall and then a lot of very local stuff, because now and then we do care about really big issues, and that’s important, and for that reason people do want national newspapers in some form. And that’s why I recently, for the first time ever, subscribed to the New York Times. If you’re ever talking to Arthur Sulzberger, tell him you’ve heard about the mysterious Wendy who convinced me to subscribe to the Times. It’s a running joke.

Raddon Resigns From L.A. Film Fest Over Prop 8 Flap — He Was For It

richraddon.jpgRich Raddon, the highly praised and well-liked director of the ever-enlarging L.A. Film Festival has resigned in the middle of a controversy over the gay-marriage Prop 8.

Unlike much of Hollywood, Raddon supported Prop 8, which would have banned the gay marriages, Variety reports.

When Prop 8 passed in California, a flurry of protests immediately erupted.

A devout Mormon, the fest director could not support a proposition that allowed for gay and lesbian marriage. He also contributed significantly to the Yes on Prop 8 campaigns.

After the uproar, he tried to resign twice and Film Independent only reluctantly agreed.

It was unclear how this will affect the Fest, which has watched and enjoyed as Raddon has grown the L.A. Fest from a small five-day event with an attendance of 22,000 to a nationally recognized 10 event in June with an audience of over 100,000 visitors.

New York Press Launches a New Website

nyphmpg.pngRemember when New York Press was edgy and cool and, dare we say, relevant? Well looks like they are aiming to become so again, this time online! In a better late than never move the weekly has launched a new, user-friendly website that now features three blogs: NY ComPRESSed: culture, news, opinion, etc.; PRESS Play: music reviews & news; On Screen: movie rants & raves. As well as the usual classifieds and movie times and locales.

Just to give you a taste, one of today’s features is The Black List: “With the election of Barack Obama, political correctness ain’t what it used to be. To help you navigate the new ins and outs, here are a few of the words, phrases, ideas and people that have now been officially blacklisted.”

Esquire Boys Hit It Big With TV Sale

katzbook.jpgEsquire contributing editor David Katz and editor-at-large A.J. Jacobs have hit it big in Hollywood (well, a little bit) with “Things a Man Should Never Do Past 30,” the Hollywood Reporter said.

The writing pair based their project on Katz’s humor book citing 500 things that Katz thinks should not be done by over-30-somethings.

The stroke of luck hit Katz/Jacobs when director/producer Barry Sonnenfeld read the book and thought he could do something with it.

What, we’re not exactly sure.

Maybe it’ll be “Get Shorty” for the 30-plus crowd.

“The show is about a guy working at men’s magazine who is reluctant to embrace adulthood and his friend who is an immersion journalist,” said Katz, who is penning “Things” with Jacobs, an immersion journalist.

Although set at a men’s magazine, Katz assured that “Things” will not be a workplace comedy.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>