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The Boston Globe Columnist Jokes That Boston Herald Would Sooner Send Them a Car Bomb Than a Cocktail

The Boston Herald — the tabloid competitor to The Boston Globe that has published columns referring to its broadsheet rivals as “pampered pukes,” among other things — spewed its usual venom at Globe columnist Kevin Cullen this week, according to an email obtained by FishbowlNY.

Or so the original email said.

Turns out the story was a joke, FishbowlNY has now learned, for which Cullen later apologized.

“Kevin’s email to colleagues was a joke,” Ellen Clegg, a Globe spokeswoman, told us, “and he has called Herald editor Joe Sciacca to apologize.”

As newsroom staff from the Chicago Tribune, the Hartford Courant and even two former interns on the paper’s Metro Desk heaped praise, food and treats on the Globe‘s weary reporters, a reporter from the Herald¬†supposedly said he and his colleagues would send a car bomb to the Globe‘s offices in Dorchester.

“Somebody at the Herald told me they were gonna send us a car bomb. And I go, ‘Oh. That’s nice. You mean that cocktail with Bailey’s Irish Cream in it?’” Cullen wrote on a staff-wide email thread about the food gifts on Thursday. “And the guy from the Herald goes, ‘No I mean a car bomb. A real car bomb. We’re going to send a feckin car bomb to Morrissey Boulevard.’”

Cullen’s wit summed up the brief memo: “It’s good to live in a two-newspaper town.”

It’s easy to see why the Herald would feel the need to hyperbolically threaten the Globe. In the newspaper battle, it seems to be losing. Last year, the Globe began printing and delivering the Herald.

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this post reported Cullen’s original email, which he later clarified was a joke. We have updated with a statement from the Globe.

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