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2014 Hillman Award Winners Announced

The Sydney Hillman Foundation has announced the winners of the 2014 Hillman Awards, which honor journalists and others whose work promotes social justice and public policy for the common good.

Below are the winners, who will be honored at The Times Center on May 6.

Book Journalism

Ira Katznelson
“Fear Itself”
Liveright/W.W. Norton & Co.

Newspaper Journalism

Pat Beall
“Private Prisons: Profit, Politics, Pain”
The Palm Beach Post

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Quentin Tarantino’s Gawker Lawsuit is Dismissed

Quentin Tarantino attempt to sue Gawker for copyright infringement has hit a road block. According to The Hollywood Reporter, a federal judge has granted Gawker’s motion to have the case dismissed.

Tarantino had sued Gawker because the site posted a link to the leaked script of Tarantino’s film, The Hateful Eight. Gawker then countered that it didn’t break any copyright laws because there’s no proof that anyone who clicked on the Gawker link saved, copied or reproduced the script. Unfortunately for Tarantino, the federal judge sided with Gawker.

“Nowhere in these paragraphs or anywhere else in the complaint does Plaintiff [Tarantino] allege a single act of direct infringement committed by any member of the general public that would support Plaintiff’s claim for contributory infringement,” read the court ruling. “Instead, Plaintiff merely speculates that some direct infringement must have taken place.”

Tarantino and his lawyer have until May 1 to correct their complaint and resubmit it. That means this isn’t officially over, even though it really should be.

[Image: cinemafestival / Shutterstock.com]

Exhibit, Book Pay Tribute to ‘Father of Canadian Photojournalism’

TedGrantCoverPreviewing Thursday and opening Friday at the Leica Gallery (607 Broadway), “Ted Grant: Sixty Years of Legendary Photojournalism” showcases a photographer known for, among other things, a shot of Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau sliding down a staircase banister at the 1968 Liberal party convention.

Over the years, Grant also taught students at Carleton University in Ottawa and later, in British Columbia, where he is now based. One former student, Carol Goar, recalls in a recent Toronto Star column how another student, Thelma Fayle, played a critical role in the exhibit coming together:

Twenty-five years after she took his course, Fayle sent a letter to Grant asking for advice on a magazine profile she’d been assigned. Not only did he respond to her letter, he came to her house with his wife Irene. They chatted at her kitchen table for three hours. Without being asked, he accompanied her to the interview, stayed in the background and took some of the most evocative photos she’d ever seen.

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Lupita Nyong’o is People’s ‘Most Beautiful’ Person

Lupita Nyong’o, the 31-year-old Oscar winning actress, has been named People’s Most Beautiful person. And since we know no one will disagree with that, what else do you want to discuss today? Seriously, she’s gorgeous.

Nyong’o described the Most Beautiful honor as “exciting” and a “major accomplishment,” because “I was happy for all the girls who would see me on [the cover] and feel a little more seen.” This woman is fantastic.

People’s Most Beautiful issue hits newsstands April 25.

Muscle & Fitness Names New Publisher Ahead of Redesign

AMI has named Christopher Dolan the new publisher of Muscle & Fitness. Dolan comes to the magazine from Scout (a sports centric brand), where he served as digital director and group publisher. Prior to that, Dolan worked in the Home & Garden Group for Reader’s Digest.

In the announcement of Dolan, Chris Scardino — AMI’s executive VP and group publishing director — mentioned that Muscle & Fitness is gearing up for a “full redesign” debuting with its July/August issue. The magazine has been getting the David Zinczenko touch ever since Zinczenko joined AMI, which means this revamp will surely mean even more of a shift toward a general interest title.

“Men are flocking to the idea of being at their best in all aspects of their lives and Muscle & Fitness is perfectly positioned to drive this trend,” said Dolan, in a statement. “This is a performance-driven male community committed to success, and I’m excited to put in front of them the editorial content and advertiser brands that will help them get there.”

FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning at a Glance

Morning Media Newsfeed: Court Torn Over Aereo | Time Inc. Board Revealed | Comcast Gains Soar

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Supreme Court Justices Express Concern Over Scope of Aereo Ruling (TVNewser)
While hearing oral arguments from attorneys representing the broadcast networks and Aereo Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court justices “appeared unsure” how to rule in the case. Reuters Aereo, backed by media mogul Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp, could be forced to shut down if the court rules for the companies challenging the startup. A win for Aereo could spur innovation in the television industry by paving the way to new, cheaper ways for consumers to watch shows. A decision is due by the end of June. Bloomberg Hearing arguments Tuesday in Washington, some justices suggested they viewed Aereo as violating broadcaster copyrights by using thousands of dime-sized antennas to get over-the-air signals without paying fees. “There’s no technological reason for you to have 10,000 dime-sized antennas other than to get around the copyright laws?” Chief Justice John Roberts asked. At the same time, the hour-long hearing didn’t clearly indicate the likely outcome, as justices including Stephen Breyer repeatedly asked whether a ruling favoring the broadcasters would imperil the cloud computing business. Variety Some of the justices on Tuesday suggested that they faced a challenge in defining just what Aereo is, and drawing a line on where privately used consumer technology ends and a publicly performing service begins. The Washington Post Aereo argued that its thousands of antennas are essentially rented to subscribers of its $8-a-month service for users to pull programs from the public airwaves legally and then store in Internet server files to watch at their convenience. In that way, it is just a mediator, the company argued, with consumers in control of how they use the company’s antennas and storage files for pulling and recording programs from the airwaves. Most of the arguments, which lasted more than an hour, were focused on the justice’s queries about the definition of public and private performances in copyright law and how Aereo differs from cable, satellite and other Internet video firms that pay broadcasters retransmission and other license fees.

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Ryan D’Agostino Named Editor-in-Chief of Popular Mechanics

Ryan D’Agostino has been named the new editor-in-chief of Popular Mechanics. He comes to the magazine from Esquire, where he had been since 2006. D’Agostino most recently served as Esquire’s articles editor. D’Agostino is succeeding Jim Meigs, who is leaving Popular Mechanics after 10 years to work on a book.

While at Esquire, D’Agostino’s work was honored with two National Magazine Awards and a James Beard Award. He previously worked as a senior editor at Money, and is the author of Rich Like Them. His writing has appeared in publications such as The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, New York and The New York Times.

In related news, David Granger, editor-in-chief of Esquire since 1997, will also serve as editorial director of Popular Mechanics.

“Ryan is not only a skilled editor and writer,” Granger said, in a statement. “He’s also an embodiment of the Popular Mechanics reader — doing renovations on a house that is more than a century old, keeping an aging pickup truck running and living at the intersection of humanity and technology. He’s got the passion that will redefine the authority of this brand to meet the challenges of the 21st century.”

D’Agostino’s appointment is effective May 1.

More and More | Famous Thoughts | Seen it All

AllTwitter: Coming soon to a Twitter feed near you — native ads! Get excited people. This is what life is all about.

GalleyCat: Alicia Silverstone has written a parenting book which contains plenty of good advice because she’s marginally famous.

AllFacebook: A study found that Facebook users really enjoy checking-in at the Grand Canyon. Makes sense. It’s not like there’s anything to see there, might as well be browsing Facebook.

Actually, Starbucks DOES Know How to Spell Colombia

ColombiaFacebookPicFor today’s example of a journalist linking to an article without fully reading that article, we turn to Boston-based GlobalPost blogger Timothy McGrath. Halfway down McGrath’s dishonor roll of celebrities, companies and media outlets that have recently and erroneously trumpeted the country of Colombia as “Columbia,” he calls out Starbucks.

However, had McGrath properly read Wall Street Journal Bogota-based reporter Dan Molinski‘s piece about the social media movement spearheaded in February 2013 by Colombian digital media executive Carlos Pardo, he would have realized that Starbucks is in this case not to blame:

The movement can take its nagging too far. When a television show about plans Starbucks has to come to Colombia [in 2014] misspelled the country, many here quickly blamed Starbucks itself. Hundreds of Colombians, with national pride on display, used it as a rallying cry to urge the company to stay away.

Starbucks said it wasn’t to blame. “Our 42-year heritage with Colombian coffee farmers dates back to Starbucks’ 1971 founding. We definitely know the difference between Colombia and Columbia,” the Seattle company said in a statement.

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