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Katie Couric’s Advice for Young Journalists

As she winds down production of her syndicated show and ramps up interviews for her role as global news anchor at Yahoo News, Katie Couric spent a few minutes with MediabistroTV earlier this month to talk about her First Big Break in the business. It was a break that would put her on the path to “Today” show anchor-dom. How she got there, what she learned, and what advice she has for young journalists who want to break in to TV news:

To watch more MediabistroTV videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV.

Matt Harvey Commits Twitter Balk

ShutterstockMrMetMost of us are familiar with the weekly social-media exercise known as “Throwback Thursday.” But in the case of sidelined Mets ace Matt Harvey, it was more like “Blowback Tuesday.”

To mark the six-month anniversary of his Tommy John surgery, Harvey earlier today tweeted an October 2013 photo showing him lying in a hospital bed with middle finger raised. The picture quickly disappeared from Twitter as did, soon thereafter, the account from which the photo was tweeted (@MattHarvey33). Per ESPN New York Mets beat writer Adam Rubin, the recovering pitcher decided – at least for now – to get out of the Twitter game after his middle-finger hospital snap generated some controversy:

The Mets confirmed requesting the deletion of the tweet with the photo because it contained a potentially offensive gesture, but the team added that the decision to delete the account belonged to Harvey.

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Professional Artist Seeks Pitches That ‘Represent the Entrepreneurial Art Community’

Professional-Artist-ArticleProfessional Artist is known as the “artist’s guide to making it.” This subscription-only pub for visual artists focuses on all things business — including law, marketing, portfolio development, exhibition presentation, communication skills as well as sales techniques.

The mag is 90 percent freelance written and editors are always on the hunt for new writers: “We are always looking for new voices and perspectives to fully represent the entrepreneurial art community,” [Jannett Roberts, publisher] says. Be sure to check the editorial calendar before sending in your pitch:

Roberts says the editorial calendar is set in advance, so editors will work to match topics with contributors who have a strong background in a specific area, such as art licensing or business development. Topics must relate to the art-business theme of the magazine. “We hardly cover technical applications of art making or critique art,” Roberts says. Freelancers are welcome to pitch features, which often range from 1,200 to 1,300 words.

For more pitching advice, read: How To Pitch: Professional Artist.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Vogue Makes Changes Ahead of Website Revamp

vogue-logo-editVogue is beefing up its web presence in advance of vogue.com’s revamp.

WWD reports that the new site will debut in September, during New York Fashion Week. How fashionable! Or whatever.

Regarding those staffing changes, here are the details so far:

 

ASME Names 2014 Cover of The Year Finalists

The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) has announced the finalists in its Cover of The Year contest. According to the judges — which included editors, photo editors and art directors — the following magazines have a shot:

  • New York
  • Bloomberg Pursuits
  • Bloomberg Businessweek
  • Boston
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Food & Wine
  • O, The Oprah Magazine
  • W
  • Vanity Fair

Our favorite? Probably Businessweek (pictured), which also won our Cover of The Year reader’s poll.

ASME will announce the winner April 30. Click through to view all the fantastic finalists.

Vin Scully, Illustrated

LARegisterVinScullyWithout a doubt, Vin Scully is the only current MLB play-by-play man who chose to annotate – for future broadcast use – Amanda Foreman‘s February 21 Wall Street Journal article “A Brief History of Avoiding Exercise.”

Per a wonderful graphic in the Los Angeles Register by visual columnist Sharon Henry, the 86-year-old Scully is still idiosyncratically at-it in Chavez Ravine. From her Vin-diagram:

He’s highlighted the [WSJ] part that describes how one out of three World War I draftees was unfit for combat. He imagines a time (perhaps when a player is out of breath after running to second) that he can share this with his audience.

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Felix Salmon Leaves Reuters, Quartz Adds Two, Yahoo Names Exec Editor

A couple moves this morning involving Reuters and Quartz, the business site from The Atlantic. Details are below.

    • Felix Salmon is leaving Reuters. The New York Times reports that Salmon hasn’t disclosed where he’s headed next. Salmon had been with Reuters since 2009. Prior to that he worked for Portfolio.
    • Quartz has hired Nikhil Sonnad and Jenni Avins. Sonnad will be a reporter on the site’s Things team and Avins a lifestlye reporter. Sonnad comes to Quartz from Sydney’s The Global Mail. Avins was a contributing editor to New York’s The Cut.
    • Susan Kittenplan is joining Yahoo as executive editor of media initiatives. Kittenplan is the founder of Kittenplan Catalyst LLC and formerly an executive editor of Allure. She has also previously served as a senior editor at GQ, deputy editor at Glamour, and associate editor and researcher at Vanity Fair.

Employee ‘TBD’ Projects Coming Soon to WSJ.com

JasonBelliniPicWall Street Journal executive editor Alma Latour took time out from his busy schedule to run down with journalism.co.uk’s Rachel Bartlett the various ways his newspaper is endeavoring to remain cutting-edge.

Employees rely on Storyful, recently purchased by parent News Corp., and video-chat service Spreecast; they get to participate in an internal, one-week immersion known as Digital Journalism at Dow Jones (DJ at DJ); and, for a potential cash prize, they participate in a new contest known as “TBD” (short, in this case, for “To Be Discovered”):

By setting up a dedicated contest which encourages its staff to think innovatively, the news outlet can drive new thinking from potentially new sources.

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Richard Turley to Leave Businessweek for MTV

Richard Turley GHere’s some sad news for magazine design fans: Richard Turley, the man behind Bloomberg Businessweek’s relentless amazing art, is leaving.

According to Turley, he is departing to take a role at MTV:

So why am I leaving? Well, after writing all this, I’m wondering the same thing.. but it’s time for me to learn something new and work with different content for a different audience. MTV has always created culture and ideas that define generations. The opportunity to work with animators, video artists, journalists, designers, musicians, artists – creating content, creating culture, for an audience as big as MTV’s is really exciting.

Turley had been Businessweek’s creative director for the past four years. Before joining the magazine, he worked for The Guardian.

The Upshot, NY Times’ Answer to FiveThirtyEight, Launches

The Upshot, The New York Times’ answer to the departure of Nate Silver and FiveThirtyEight, is now live. The site is edited by David Leonhardt, the Times’ Washington bureau chief.

Just like FiveThirtyEight, The Upshot is focused on the intersection of data and news. And just like FiveThirtyEight, there will be forecasts made about the political world. Already, The Upshot has an interactive model that analyzes every Senate race in the upcoming midterm elections.

“We created The Upshot to serve as a destination for readers who want to deepen their understanding of the issues and policies that influence their daily lives,” said Leonhardt, in a statement. “Using a conversational tone and a rich stream of graphics and interactives, The Upshot will build on what the Times already does so well — provide analysis of the news happening all around us. We also invite our readers to become a part of the conversation.”

Time will tell if Times readers come to love The Upshot as much as they did FiveThirtyEight. Even if they don’t, the Times is smart to try and recapture some of that data driven magic.

See below for the full team of editors and contributors working on The Upshot.

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