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Posts Tagged ‘AARP The Magazine’

What AARP The Magazine is Looking for in a Personal Essay

Personal-Essay-Market-Personal essays allow writers to share some of the intimate details of their life with the world, and this can be a cathartic and rewarding experience. It can also be quite lucrative, if you pitch to the right pubs.

In Part I of our newly updated Personal Essay Markets series, we’ve compiled a diverse list of 15 markets that are eager for first-person material from freelancers. Editors from each pub told us exactly they’re looking for. Here’s a sneak peek:

AARP The Magazine
The crucial ingredient in essays for AARP is that they must offer fresh insight into an aspect of life after 50. Style and emotional heft are also important.
Length: 1,200-1,500 words
Pay: $2 a word
Assigning editors: Margaret Guroff or David Dudley, FirstInitialLastName@AARP.org
Guroff’s advice: ”Originality is key. Certain life events, such as caring for a parent with Alzheimer’s disease, inspire many more great essays than we could ever hope to publish. We’re looking for the compelling reads and universal truths in unusual, extreme or common-but-little-discussed life experiences.”

To get similar info on publications like BUST, Elle and American Baby, read: Personal Essay Markets, Part I.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

This Pitch to AARP The Magazine Worked — Here’s Why

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Freelance writer Joan Trossman Bien knew she had an interesting story on her hands. A friend introduced her to Dulanie Ellis, a 64-year-old documentary filmmaker who discovered her true passion later on in life. Bien thought Ellis’ story was a perfect fit for AARP The Magazine, and pitched it as a profile for the feature well.

Features editor Margaret Guroff thought the piece would work better for the mag’s FOB, and passed it along to David Dudley. One of Ellis’ documentaries was about farm-to-vet programs, and Dudley thought it would be an ideal story for the mag’s “Upfront” section. “The bottom line here is that Joan’s idea had at least three or four big things going for it,” said Dudley. “It hit on an issue that we’d been wanting to write about. It had a simple, easily understood premise that would make sense even in a short 200-word piece. [And] it had a timely Veteran’s Day connection…”

THE PITCH:

Ms. Guroff:

I would like to write a profile for you about a woman who has truly found herself in the second act of her life and has made the many changes needed to accomplish her new passion. There is a new trend developing among baby boomers, brought about by a combination of circumstances and a belief that once you step aside, you lose your involvement in life. The majority do not intend to retire. Dulanie Ellis counts herself in that crowd.

To read the rest of the pitch and find out why the editors chose it, read: Pitches That Worked: AARP The Magazine.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $2 a Word At AARP The Magazine

The editors of AARP The Magazine are set on featuring rich content that inspires, informs and entertains, but freelancers don’t need to have reached the second half of life to break into this widely-read publication. All it takes is a timely story that resonates with their 50-plus audience.

“We tend to green-light freelance queries that are innovative, forward-looking and indicate that the writer has carefully studied the magazine,” deputy editor Marilyn Milloy said. And, lucky for you, any section not penned by a regular columnist is wide open to pitches.

Get all the details in mediabistro.com’s How To Pitch: AARP The Magazine.

AARP Names New Deputy Editor, Photo Director

aarp.pngYesterday, AARP The Magazine announced the promotion of features editor Marilyn Milloy to deputy editor, while acting director of photography Quentin Nardi was appointed photo director.

Milloy, who will manage AARP‘s feature editorial staff, oversee the story lineup and work to expand the world’s largest circulation magazine’s online presence, was named features editor at the pub in 2007. She previously worked for Newsday and NEA Today, the magazine published by the National Education Association, where she was editor-in-chief. She also helped develop the print and online package “1968: The Year that Rocked our World,” which won AARP its first National Magazine Award.

Before joining AARP Nardi worked at a number of publications, including Go magazine, Ski magazine, Outside magazine, Bon Appetit and Men’s Journal.

The full release is after the jump

Earlier: Familiar Face Fills Top Spot At AARP

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