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Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Hoffman Found Dead | Super Bowl Ads Score Big | O’Reilly Grills Obama

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Award-Winning Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman Found Dead in Manhattan (WSJ)
Award-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead of an apparent drug overdose late Sunday morning in his Manhattan apartment, authorities said. Law-enforcement officials said a hypodermic needle and two glassine envelopes containing what is believed to be heroin were found in the apartment on Bethune Street in the West Village. The 46-year-old actor was found unconscious in the bathroom of his fourth-floor apartment in the Pickwick House around 11:15 a.m. by screenwriter David Bar Katz, who called 911, a law-enforcement official said. He was pronounced dead at the scene. NY Post In a statement released by his manager, Hoffman’s family called his death “a tragic and sudden loss.” FishbowlNY Hoffman, a native of Fairport, N.Y., was last seen notably on screen as Lancaster Dodd in The Master. He had a number of film projects in the pipeline, including The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 1 and Part 2, for which he reprised the role of Plutarch Heavensbee. GalleyCat The actor’s work had many literary connections. He won an Oscar for his appearance as Truman Capote in Bennett Miller’s biopic Capote. Hoffman starred in the film adaptation of The Hunger Games. In addition, he starred as Willy Loman in Mike Nichols’ revival of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman on stage in New York. CNN He was a beefy 5-foot-10 but won an Oscar for playing the slight, 5-foot-3 Capote. He had the booming voice of a deity but often played schlubs and conflicted characters.

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Magazines to End Four Year Revenue Loss Says Optimistic Report [Update]

PricewaterhouseCoopers thinks things are finally going to turn the corner for magazines. According to a report from the company, 2012 will be the year glossies stop losing money; halting a streak of four straight in the red. Ad Age says that PricewaterhouseCoopers believes overall revenue at magazines will inch up by 0.1 percent as ad spending ticks up two percent. Digital advertising is projected to jump 17 percent as well.

“There are now signs that the economy in both the United States and Canada is improving, and we expect an expanding economy to have a positive impact on print advertising in consumer magazines, which will continue to fare much better than print advertising in newspapers,” PricewaterhouseCoopers stated in its report.

The study was finalized before the sour job report was released last week, but don’t let that get you down. It’s time to celebrate! After work you can enjoy o.1 percent of a beer.

UPDATE:
Something is up. According to a PricewaterhouseCoopers spokesperson, “The report actually doesn’t launch until next Tuesday and the data has not been finalized yet.” Ad Age’s article said it was, but it has now been removed from their site, as you’ll see if you try to click the link above. We’ll post the final report next Tuesday.

More Bad News for Print

As fans of print (mainly magazines, but we’re New York Times subscribers too!), the above graph, via The Atlantic, is sort of disconcerting. As you can see, the amount of time we spend with print is way out of proportion with how many ad dollars the medium fetches. Meanwhile, digital engagement is almost 20 times higher than that of print, making it a much better bargain for advertisers.

And let’s not even mention TV. That format, quite simply, crushes everything else.

For further analyzation of the graph, head over to The Atlantic.

Magazine Ad Pages Drop 8 Percent in 1Q

Sorry to start your Monday with bad news, but… We’ve got bad news for fellow magazine enthusiasts out there: For the third quarter in a row, magazine ad pages have declined. The Wall Street Journal reports that ad pages fell eight percent in the first quarter of 2012, as more advertisers spend their money in the digital realm. Another factor was a significant pull back by the automotive and food industries, which are typically big spenders.

Magazines that were hit the hardest include Golf Digest, In Touch Weekly, O, The Oprah MagazineMartha Stewart Living and Men’s Fitness, which all saw ad pages fall by 20 percent or more.

We’ll try to make the next post a little happier.

[Photo via Flickr]

Magazines See Growth in Ad Pages

Because we like to be the bearer of good news here at FishbowlNY, we bring you this: Magazine ad pages in the first quarter were up almost three percent compared to first quarter 2010.

This marks the fourth straight quarter – starting in second quarter 2010 – that ad pages have increased.

The biggest boost was from the automotive market, which bought 1,692 pages in 2010, but bumped it up to 2,134 this year – a jump of 26 percent. Check out the rest of the numbers on the MPA’s press release.

So there, some good news to end your day. Try to think of this on the subway ride home tonight. Not whether the guy with massive, luxurious neck hair uses shampoo on it.

2010 Media Predictions: Year Of The Tablet?

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Today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven offered up some predictions for the New Year for advertising and publishing, pulled from experts around the Web.

Matt said creativity would abound in 2010, as agencies start to care a little less about polished end products and more about things like viral videos. Jason said he thought the same thing would be seen in publishing, causing the larger publishing houses — which are less nimble — to suffer.

Jason also said 2010 would be the year of the tablet. “The idea that we can have something the same size as a Kindle that has a color touch-screen and can be online all the time and can do the same things that my computer can do, that makes me very excited about reading,” he said. “I think it’s going to be a tremendous boon to the industry.”

Other predictions: brands will start acting more like people (“Very attractive people,” Jason added); a big year for angels; and, as the recession continues, more saving money online, from actual financial planning at Mint.com to using the Web to save money on everything from movies to engagement rings.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

On The Menu: Advertising 101 And Innovating Account Planning

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If you’ve ever wondered what goes on inside an advertising agency, today’s mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast is one for you.

This morning, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven welcomed Alain Sylvain, the managing director of New York-based agency Redscout, who discussed a new video series initiative his company is launching with PSFK that seeks to innovate account planning.

What is account planning, you ask? “Planning is really a function within agencies…that was designed to enhance the development of ads,” Alain explained. “It was meant to enhance it with the voice of the consumer. It was an effort to make the creative development more tapped into what consumers really wanted and really felt…But over the years the role of planning and the role of planners has been a little unclear.”

The new video series seeks to answer questions that agencies and planners have about planning. In the broader sense, Jason and Matt were wondering if planning could help the struggling media world of magazines, newspapers and books. Alain said he believed there was still a way to update the current approach to long-form content, from books to feature length articles. “You will see a lot of former journalists go into planning,” Alain said. “What you won’t see is planners going into publishing…But if I was a young planner frustrated at an agency, I would definitely consider going to work for a publishing house. It’s basically the same discipline.”

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Harper’s No Content Promise

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Check out this house ad in the October issue of Harper’s Magazine.

The ad promises that you’ll never find “content” in the pages of Harper’s.

“Everybody gives you ‘content.’ But you’ll never find that in Harper’s Magazine” the ad boasts. “Instead you’ll get literature. Investigative reporting. Criticism. Photojournalism. Provocative adventures. Daring commentary. And truth-telling as only Harper’s Magazine can tell it.”

What do you think of this new advertising platform? Are you sick of the word “content” as well?

They May Be In Advertising But Everyone Loves A Party

asparty.jpgLast night, our buddies at mediabistro.com’s advertising blog AgencySpy hosted a party with TRAFFIQ at Pranna on Madison Ave. We made an appearance and were pleasantly surprised to find that spirits were high and drinks were plentiful. On second thought, maybe spirits were high because the drinks were plentiful. No matter, we had fun and we’re happy to note that, even in this economy, we haven’t forgotten how to have a good time.

Oh, and if you’re into party pics like us, check out this slideshow from last night.

Goodby, Silverstein Wins Top MPA Prizes For Outstanding Magazine Advertising

kelly2.pngAdvertising may not be enough to keep the magazine industry alive anymore, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t still great work being done.

Yesterday, the Magazine Publishers of America celebrated outstanding work in magazine advertising with the announcement of the winners of its Kelly Awards. Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in San Francisco won the top prize — the Grand Prize Kelly — for its “There Can Only Be One” ads developed for the National Basketball Association. The ads, which promoted basketball games on ESPN, ABC and TNT, helped increase television ratings by 61 percent, the MPA said.

The agency also snagged the second place Gold Kelly for its work with ice cream maker Haagen Dazs and its “Haagen Dazs Loves Honey Bees” magazine ad campaign. The third place Silver Kelly went to Energy BBDO’s Canadian Club campaign, “Damn Right Your Dad Drank It.”

This was also the first year in the 28-year history of the Kelly Awards that the MPA allowed consumers to vote on their favorite ads. The results provided a list of “America’s Favorite Magazine Ads,” with BBDO NY’s “Hands” campaign for AT&T taking the top spot.

A full list of winners is after the jump

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