TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Alex Koppelman’

The New Yorker Names Jonathan Shainin Online News Editor

Jonathan Shainin has been named news editor of Newyorker.com. Shainin comes to The New Yorker from The Caravan, where he served as senior editor since 2010. This will be Shainin’s second stint with The New Yorker, as he served as fact checker for the magazine from 2005 to 2007.

Shainin was the founding editor of The Review, a supplement to The National in Abu Dhabi. He has also worked at The New York Review of Books and his work has appeared in Salon, The Nation, The Paris Review and more.

“Jonathan is brilliant and beloved here,” Nick Thompson, editor of Newyorker.com, told FishbowlNY. “We couldn’t be more delighted that he’s coming back.”

Shainin starts October 14. He succeeds Alex Koppelman, who departed the New Yorker to join The Guardian.

Mediabistro Course

Overcoming Writer's Block

Overcoming Writer's BlockUse proven tools and exercises to get back to writing! Starting July 15, learn a process that will help you pinpoint your optimal writing conditions, structure your time and build a framework to increase your productivity. Register now! 

The Guardian Finds Its U.S. News Editor

KoppelmanHeadshotAt the beginning of August, we highlighted – as we sometimes like to – a noteworthy NYC journalism job ad. So it seemed only natural to let you know who went on to land this particular choice gig.

Moving over October 14 from The New Yorker to The Guardian as U.S. news editor is Alex Koppelman. From today’s announcement:

“Alex brings a wealth of experience and a unique perspective that will help us move into the next phase of our growth as a firmly entrenched U.S. news operation,” said Guardian U.S. editor Janine Gibson.

Read more

The New Yorker Names Adweek News Editor to Online Team

Alex Koppelman has been hired as The New Yorker’s new online Associate News Editor. Koppelman was most recently with Adweek as its News Editor, and prior to that was a political blogger for Salon.com.

Koppelman announced the move via his Twitter account, tweeting, “Some job news: I’m sad to be leaving Adweek, but very excited to start soon as associate news editor at NewYorker.com.”

Journalists Question Veracity of Harper‘s Award-Winning Guantánamo Story

Was Scott Horton‘s “The Guantanamo ‘Suicides’” article, surprise winner of the National Magazine Award for Best Reporting, just another empty conspiracy theory?

The premise of the article was that three detainees who reportedly hanged themselves in Guantanamo had actually been killed during a torture session, and President Obama’s administration at minimum failed to fully investigate this because of what a public relations nightmare it would have been. But Alex Koppelman at Adweek argues that the theory doesn’t hold up.

Koppelman says that the story was shopped around to many investigative journalists, including The New Yorker’s Seymour Hersh and NBC News’ chief Pentagon correspondent Jim Miklaszewski. Several devoted months to investigating the story, but ultimately set it aside after deeming it not credible.  “Only after the big guys passed was the story shopped to Horton,” writes Koppelman. “He won for reporting, but in fact the story fell right into his lap, factual flaws and all.”

What made other journalists pass on the story? For one, Horton’s main sources “were perimeter guards, distant from the prisoners.” When they compared their accounts with “official reports of the suicide… it didn’t match up.”  Moreover, Horton’s story left out a few key details, including the fact that one of the independent autopsies of the prisoners “ended with the conclusion that hanging was, in fact, the most likely cause of death.” And another questionable point is the fact that the story’s source, who reportedly saw the detainees carted off in a white van, had “no way of knowing whether the men he saw were the ones who died later that night.”

The Harper‘s story has met with controversy from the beginning, though the National Magazine Awards stands by its choice.