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Posts Tagged ‘AP’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Silver Dings Politico | ONA Announces Honors | AP’s Lewis Suspended


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Nate Silver Previews Site, Hits Politico (Politico / Dylan Byers on Media)
Nate Silver, the statistician who recently joined ESPN from The New York Times, previewed his new website on Friday and dished out some criticisms of the current journalism environment, much of it directed at Politico. Delivering the keynote address at this year’s Online News Association conference in Atlanta, Silver said the new fivethirtyeight.com will be free and will launch “very early next year.” “The idea is that it’s a Web product, first and foremost. I’m sure we’ll build out podcasts and video coverage over time, but really the core challenge is in identifying writers and journalists who have the right critical thinking ability,” Silver said. TheWrap Silver also took a few swipes at Politico, whose coverage of elections and politics he’s often criticized, calling it an example of what journalists shouldn’t do. A recent article assumed that correlation equaled causation, Silver said, in stating that the government shutdown lead to Virginia gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe’s upswing in the polls. TPM / LiveWire Silver said that the way in which the information was presented in the article, not the information itself, was the issue. “It was a fine theory, but instead it was stated as a fact when there was no proof of it whatsoever,” he added.

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Terry Taylor to Retire from AP After 36 Years [Update]

Terry Taylor is retiring from the Associted Press after 36 years. The AP tweeted that she will be stepping down in November.

Taylor joined the AP in 1977 and became its first female sports editor in 1992. As the AP’s sports editor, she oversaw over 100 staffers across the globe. She also helmed the AP’s Olympics coverage.

Taylor left the AP briefly, from December 1990 to September 1991, to join the New York Times as an assistant sports editor. However, she knew that it wasn’t the right fit.

“It was good for me,” Taylor told Editor & Publisher, of her stint with the paper. “I knew I didn’t belong there but belonged to the AP, the backbone of journalism. Get the news, verify it and send it out. For most of my career, that’s what I’ve done.”

Update (12:15 pm):
Below is the memo from the AP’s managing editor Lou Ferrara, announcing Taylor’s retirement.

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AP CEO Lists Five Ways to Ensure Freedom of The Press

Gary Pruitt, the Associated Press’ president and CEO, has had about enough of the government. After the Justice Department secretly obtained two months worth of phone records from AP reporters and editors, Pruitt now says that government sources are scared to talk to reporters. “The government may love this,” Pruitt added, during a speech at the National Press Club. “I suspect that they do, but beware the government that loves secrecy too much.”

In an effort to nudge the government toward a less creepy lifestyle, Pruitt also announced five measures that could ensure freedom of the press. Here’s a brief summary of his ideas: 1) The press should be able to respond to any request of information before its taken 2) There should be judicial oversight when anything is requested 3) The DOJ’s guidelines need updated 4) A federal shield law that protects journalists should be implemented and 5) A formal rule should be made of the guideline that the DOJ will not prosecute any journalist for being a journalist.

It’s a nice list. Now if only the government would heed Pruitt’s advice.

See below for Pruitt’s full statements on the measures.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: NYT, AP Snub Holder, Musto’s New Gigs, MSNBC Ratings Crash


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New York Times, AP Won’t Attend Off-The-Record Eric Holder Meeting (HuffPost / The Backstory)
The New York Times and Associated Press said Wednesday that they will not attend a meeting this week between attorney general Eric Holder and the Washington bureau chiefs of several media outlets to discuss guidelines for journalists in leak investigations. Times executive editor Jill Abramson cited the Justice Department’s request that the discussion be kept off the record as a reason for not attending. NYT Even as Holder has sought to regain his footing, Republicans have resumed their criticism, accusing him of misleading Congress in testimony over whether the Justice Department has considered prosecuting journalists under the Espionage Act for publishing government secrets. HuffPost / The Backstory Associated Press president and chief executive Gary Pruitt told staff at a Wednesday town hall meeting that the phone records obtained by the government included “thousands and thousands” of calls in and out of the news organization, according to a staffer who attended. BuzzFeed Leading civil liberties groups criticized comments made by the Democratic Party’s communications director that media groups refusing to attend the off-the-record meeting are giving up their “right [to] gripe” about the Department of Justice’s pursuit of journalists’ records under Holder’s leadership.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Gov’t Defends AP Snoop | Apple Denies Collusion | Sambolin Has Cancer


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Justice Dept. Defends Seizure of AP Phone Records (NYT)
Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on Tuesday defended the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of telephone records of Associated Press journalists, describing the article by the AP that prompted a criminal investigation as among “the top two or three most serious leaks that I’ve ever seen” in a 35-year career. “It put the American people at risk, and that is not hyperbole,” he said in an apparent reference to an article on May 7, 2012, that disclosed the foiling of a terrorist plot by Al Qaeda’s branch in Yemen to bomb an airliner. The Washington Post / Opinions The usual reason for keeping a subpoena secret is that the target would otherwise try to destroy documents. In this case, the AP could not have done so even if it wanted to, since the relevant records were in the possession of its phone service providers. Without even giving AP a chance to weigh in, we don’t see how the department could intelligently weigh its prosecutorial needs against this broad subpoena’s chilling effect on reporters and their sources. HuffPost / The Backstory Associated Press Washington bureau chief Sally Buzbee was among the journalists targeted in the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of phone records that has drawn widespread condemnation from members of the media and free speech advocates, an AP spokeswoman confirmed to The Huffington Post. FishbowlNY The Department of Justice is trying to brush off the secret accessing of AP editors’ and reporters’ phone records. The agency already sent one bland letter to the AP about the incident, and Tuesday, it sent another. According to AP CEO and president Gary Pruitt, both letters from the DOJ basically said “Meh,” and not much else about the scary over-extension of the government. B&C Society of Professional Journalists president Sonny Albarado has condemned the Justice Department’s alleged secret collection of AP reporter and editor phone records and said it highlights the need for a federal shield law. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The Associated Press Media Editors Association has joined other journalists in condemning the Justice Department’s seizure of Associated Press phone records, calling it part of the Obama administration’s “continuing witch hunt for leaks and whistleblowers.” TVNewser Fox News host Bill O’Reilly said this may be the least of President Obama’s worries. “I don’t think that’s going to amount to much,” O’Reilly said of the phone taps. “It looks like they went through the warrant process and they had authorization to look at these records — the Justice Department did. But President Obama, he’s got some problems now. He better start to get control of the situation because there’s a lot of stuff going on.” Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Gov’t Defends AP Snoop | Apple Denies Collusion | Sambolin Has Cancer


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Justice Dept. Defends Seizure of AP Phone Records (NYT)
Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on Tuesday defended the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of telephone records of Associated Press journalists, describing the article by the AP that prompted a criminal investigation as among “the top two or three most serious leaks that I’ve ever seen” in a 35-year career. “It put the American people at risk, and that is not hyperbole,” he said in an apparent reference to an article on May 7, 2012, that disclosed the foiling of a terrorist plot by Al Qaeda’s branch in Yemen to bomb an airliner. The Washington Post / Opinions The usual reason for keeping a subpoena secret is that the target would otherwise try to destroy documents. In this case, the AP could not have done so even if it wanted to, since the relevant records were in the possession of its phone service providers. Without even giving AP a chance to weigh in, we don’t see how the department could intelligently weigh its prosecutorial needs against this broad subpoena’s chilling effect on reporters and their sources. HuffPost / The Backstory Associated Press Washington bureau chief Sally Buzbee was among the journalists targeted in the Justice Department’s sweeping seizure of phone records that has drawn widespread condemnation from members of the media and free speech advocates, an AP spokeswoman confirmed to The Huffington Post. FishbowlNY The Department of Justice is trying to brush off the secret accessing of AP editors’ and reporters’ phone records. The agency already sent one bland letter to the AP about the incident, and Tuesday, it sent another. According to AP CEO and president Gary Pruitt, both letters from the DOJ basically said “Meh,” and not much else about the scary over-extension of the government. B&C Society of Professional Journalists president Sonny Albarado has condemned the Justice Department’s alleged secret collection of AP reporter and editor phone records and said it highlights the need for a federal shield law. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The Associated Press Media Editors Association has joined other journalists in condemning the Justice Department’s seizure of Associated Press phone records, calling it part of the Obama administration’s “continuing witch hunt for leaks and whistleblowers.” TVNewser Fox News host Bill O’Reilly said this may be the least of President Obama’s worries. “I don’t think that’s going to amount to much,” O’Reilly said of the phone taps. “It looks like they went through the warrant process and they had authorization to look at these records — the Justice Department did. But President Obama, he’s got some problems now. He better start to get control of the situation because there’s a lot of stuff going on.”

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Shepard Fairey Sentenced to Two Years Probation for AP Photo Case

Shepard Fairey was sentenced to two years probation and 300 hours of community service for fabricating documents in his lawsuit against the Associated Press, which rightfully claimed Fairey had used one of their photos for his iconic “Obama Hope” poster. Fairey has since apologized for the incident, claiming it was the “worst mistake of his life.”

The defense prosecution asked for jail time for Fairey, while Fairey’s lawyers argued that his offenses were misdemeanors.

“After spending a great amount of time, energy and legal effort, all of us at The Associated Press are glad this matter is finally behind us,” said Gary Pruitt, the AP’s president and CEO, in a statement. “We hope this case will serve as a clear reminder to all of the importance of fair compensation for those who gather and produce original news content.”

John Mancini Named Assistant Managing Editor of AP Nerve Center

Former Newsday editor John Mancini has been named assistant managing editor overseeing overnight operations at the AP’s Nerve Center in New York, the AP reports.

The 25-member Nerve Center was formed last year to coordinate the work of field leaders who direct coverage in their areas. Mancini will coordinate “late-breaking coverage from North and South America, daytime content for Asia and early coverage for the Middle East and Europe, in addition to focusing on U.S. East Coast drive-time coverage.” Sounds like he has his work cut out for him!

Prior to serving as an editor at Newsday for six years, Mancini was the New York Post metro editor.

 

The AP Falls for Hoax Press Release in which GE Pledges to Return Its Entire $3.2 Billion Tax Refund

The Associated Press optimistically posted a story “GE to Return $3.2 billion to US Treasury” indicating that, in a fit of social conscientiousness, the corporation decided to donate its entire $3.2 billion tax refund back to the U.S. Treasury, as well as “create one job in the U.S. for each new job it creates overseas.”

Well, that’s amazing! Thanks, GE!

But if it seems to good to be true, it probably is. Business Insider reports that this article was actually based on a fake press release titled “GE Responds to Public Outcry – Will Donate Entire $3.2 Billion Tax Refund to Help Offset Cuts and Save American Jobs,” posted at a site called http://www.genewscenters.com/. The entire press release is posted at Business Insider.

Oops! Apparently the “obvious” hoax was in response to the New York Timesclaim last month that GE, despite its huge profits, was paying no taxes.

WaPo Nixes Salons In Face Of Criticism|The New York Blade Closes Up Shop|MediaNews Denies Bankruptcy|Boston Mag Owner Dumps “Idiot” Editors|SalaryTK’s Unpaid Job Posts Sad But True


FishbowlDC: The Washington Post responded to criticism of its proposal offering lobbyists and others off-the-record access to reporters and editors for a price. The “salon” idea has since been nixed altogether. Also: some fun bits from the AP‘s interview with President Barack Obama today.

The New York Times: Biweekly gay newspaper The New York Blade has suspended publication after its parent company, HX Media, was sold.

Editor & Publisher: MediaNews Group, which publishes the Denver Post and other daily papers, has denied bankruptcy rumors.

Boston Globe: Boston magazine owner Herb Lipson‘s approach to owning a magazine: “When the economy turns and it [the magazine] gets skinny, he figures the editor is an idiot,” a former editor said.

BusinessWeek: Jon Fine has a chuckle at SalaryTK.com, “The job board for journalists who don’t want to get paid.”

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