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Posts Tagged ‘Arthur Sulzberger’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Amazon Prime Price Hike | McCarthy to Wonkblog | Drone Covers Harlem

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Amazon Prime Gets Price Bump to $99 A Year (VentureBeat)
Nine years after it launched, Amazon Prime is getting an inevitable price increase. Amazon announced Thursday that Prime will now cost $99 per year in the U.S., a slight bump from the previous $79 a year price. WSJ The Seattle retailer said the 25 percent increase was needed to offset rising delivery and content-acquisition costs. The $99 price takes effect for new members on March 20. Existing Prime members will pay the higher rate when they renew. CNNMoney In February, Amazon said it was considering raising the price to $119 a year. Prime members get two-day shipping on a large number of Amazon items at no extra cost, plus the ability to borrow Kindle books and stream movies and television shows. The company also said that it has increased the benefits of the program, now offering free shipping on 19 million items, up from only 1 million nine years ago. It also introduced its video streaming service in 2011 and recently launched Amazon-produced shows. THR The $99 price point may open the door for a tiered pricing system that would allow people to subscribe to Amazon Instant Video or Kindle’s lending library separately. Amazon does not disclose the number of Prime members, but research from Cowen and Co. estimates that there are about 23 million members in the United States, representing a 37 percent increase year-over-year in January. The research also indicates that 95 percent of Prime members visit Amazon monthly and 85 percent make a purchase.

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Arthur Sulzberger and Mark Thompson Talk NY Times

NY Times Lays Out Plan for Native Ads

The New York Times is set to dip into the native advertisement game, so the paper’s publisher, Arthur Sulzberger, has explained how, exactly, it would do that.

The issue with sponsored content is that it often seems to blur the lines between editorial content and advertising. When an ad looks exactly like an article, it can create confusion among readers. However, Sulzberger wrote in a memo to staffers that there would be a “strict separation between the newsroom and the job of creating content for the new native ads.”

The Times will distinguish native ads by placing a blue border around them, along with a colored bar and a “Paid Post” notification. The sponsored content will begin in January on the home page and other popular sections of NYTimes.com. The number of paid posts — created by the ad department — will be small, at least at first.

It’s unfortunate that the Times even has to take the native ads route, but that’s how things go now. Running the best newspaper in the world takes a lot of money, and sponsored content is an easy way to bring in heaps of it.

Arthur Sulzberger: ‘The Times is Not For Sale’

Everyone else has had their say about The New York Times being sold, so we might as well get something from the Times’ publisher, Arthur Sulzberger. In a statement reported by the Times, Sulzberger was emphatic, declaring that the Grey Lady is not for sale:

Will our family seek to sell The Times? The answer to that is no. The Times is not for sale, and the trustees of the Ochs-Sulzberger Trust and the rest of the family are united in our commitment to work together with the company’s board, senior management and employees to lead The New York Times forward into our global and digital future.

Can’t get more direct than that, right? That should settle things! Right?

Jill Abramson on Politico Piece: ‘I Cried’

Newsweek has a lengthy profile of Jill Abramson — executive editor of The New York Times — up today, and it’s well worth your time. One section we wanted to highlight was Abramson addressing the Politico hit piece, in which anonymous Times staffers criticized her for doing nothing more than acting like their boss. Abramson admitted that the piece impacted her deeply:

‘I cried,’ Abramson tells me. ‘I should say it went right off me, but I’m just being honest. I did cry. But by the next morning, I wasn’t completely preoccupied by it anymore. I had my cry and that was that. And [Times Co. chairman] Arthur Sulzberger came down and was very supportive. He basically said, ‘It goes with the territory. Don’t let it get to you.’” The publisher also invoked what he calls the Second Law of Journalism: ‘It’s not your fault. It’s just your turn.’

No doubt people are foaming at the mouth reading that Abramson cried. “She cried! She’s weak! What a woman.” But we find it refreshingly honest. Good for her. People do cry when they’re hurt! However, it takes someone particularly strong to admit that.

Another section from the Newsweek piece that we wanted to point out is Abramson’s meeting with the lawyer representing Nate Silver. Silver was debating leaving (and he ultimately did) and so the two met to talk about Silver’s future:

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Arthur Sulzberger Made $6.9 Million Last Year

Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of The New York Times Company, is doing quite well. Not that you asked, but just in case you were wondering, things couldn’t be better.

According to The Wall Street Journal, in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, the Times reported that Sulzberger earned a whopping $6.9 million in 2012. That’s up from $5.9 million in 2011.

Not bad, right? Sure, it’s not Michael Bloomberg money, but hey, you have to start somewhere.

New York Times’ Scott Heekin-Canedy to Retire, Role Will Be Eliminated

Scott Heekin-Canedy is retiring from The New York Times Company, effective December 30. Heekin-Canedy has been with the Times since 1992; serving as president and general manager since 2004.

Heekin-Canedy was one of the forces behind the Times implementing its paywall, which has been a success. In a note to staff, Arthur Sulzberger said losing Heekin-Canedy meant that “we are losing a great talent who has seen us through a very difficult economic period.”

According to the Times, Heekin-Canedy’s position will be eliminated when he steps aside.

New York Times Gains Digital Subscribers, But Revenue Drops

The New York Times Company reported its third quarter earnings today. Let’s go with the good news first. Circulation revenue at the company rose by seven percent during the last quarter, thanks in large part to the success of digital subscriptions. The number of digital subscribers to The New York Times and The International Herald Tribune rose to 566,000, an 11 percent increase since 2Q.

Now for the bad news. The company saw overall revenue drop by 0.6 percent, to $449 million. Revenue fell because ad earnings crashed by almost nine percent.

Arthur Sulzberger, of course, tried to stick to the positive news from the report. “While our results for the third quarter reflect continued pressure on advertising revenues, total circulation revenues rose, led by the ongoing expansion of our digital subscription base,” said Sulzberger, in a statement.

Newspaper Guild Sends Another Letter to Arthur Sulzberger

The latest move by the Newspaper Guild of New York to get the New York Times to budge on a new contract involved a new letter to Arthur Sulzberger. Signed by 248 Times staffers, the note urges him to meet the union’s demands, because the alternative is something neither side wants:

As it became clear that not even mediation was moving the company to realistic terms on compensation, we have taken the temperature of the newsroom. Some of our colleagues have moved beyond their bewilderment, past a sense of betrayal, to openly discussing the prospect of having to seek other work, perhaps even new careers. After building the world’s finest newsroom with people who would literally go to war for The Times, you cannot possibly regard these outcomes as desirable. We don’t.

The letter was delivered to Sulzberger only hours after Times union members handed out informational flyers in front of the Times building.

The entire letter to Sulzberger can be read here.

New York Times Names Mark Thompson CEO

Mark Thompson has been named the new president and CEO of The New York Times Company. Thompson is the outgoing director general of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), a position he has held since 2004. Aside from a two year stint as CEO of Britain’s Channel 4, Thompson has been with the BBC since he came aboard as a production trainee in 1979.

In a statement, Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of the Times Company, said Thompson is “a gifted and experienced executive with strong credentials whose leadership at the BBC helped it to extend its trusted brand identity into new digital products and services.”

So ends the search for someone to replace Janet Robinson, who departed the Times in December of last year. Now comes the hard part for Thompson and the Times: Dealing with declining ad dollars in a world that continues to shift toward digital media.

From FishbowlNY to Thompson — good luck. You’re probably going to need some.

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