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Posts Tagged ‘Barry Blitt’

Barry Blitt Honors The Oscars

For the his latest New Yorker cover, Barry Blitt honors the upcoming Academy Awards with a nip-and-tucked Oscar. Blitt gave the award a slew of upgrades, including “chin work,” “neck work,” and something scary called a “freshened nape.”

Nice work by Blitt, but our favorite Academy Award New Yorker cover was one from Bruce McCall. In 2012, McCall drew giant Oscars getting blitzed to celebrate winning several tiny human statues. See it below.

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New Yorker Cover Pokes Fun at Chris Christie’s Bridge Scandal

When Barry Blitt described his latest New Yorker cover, he explained, “I’m hoping this cartoon diverts a lot of traffic to my website.”

Well said, Barry. Well said.

The New Yorker’s Bashar al-Assad and Walter White Cover is Brilliant

The New Yorker’s latest cover, featuring Bashar al-Assad and Walter White, is a perfect example of the brilliance that can emerge when an artist tackles the intersection of real life and fiction.

The illustration, titled “Bad Chemistry,” was created by the legendary Barry Blitt.

Françoise Mouly Discusses New Yorker Covers

Françoise Mouly has been The New Yorker’s Arts Editor for almost two decades, so she has seen her fair share of covers. In an interview with Salon, she explains the process for selecting the artwork and it’s well worth a read.

We love the Barry Blitt cover on the right, but Mouly says it was rejected because the Mentos and Diet Coke reference — when mixed exciting things happen — was deemed to obscure.

Here are a few other highlights from the Salon piece.

On what makes for a good cover:

What I’m really looking for are ideas that come from the artists on topics that will give us a sign of the era that we live in and, as a collection of images, will collect a picture of our time.

On why Blitt listens to Rush Limbaugh:

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Mayor Bloomberg Pleased With His New Yorker Cover

The cover of this week’s New Yorker depicts NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg staring at himself in the mirror while he munches on Valentine’s Day chocolates as hearts dance around his head.  Not exactly the most humble depiction of Mayor Mike, but surprisingly Bloomberg is not at all upset with the narcisstic tone of the caricature.  After joining President Obama, former NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani, and the Pope as cover subjects for the New Yorker, Bloomberg was flattered at the thought of the “Bloom in Love” illustration.

If I am in that company, boy, I guess I should have a very big smile on my face.  I like what I see in the mirror, and I hope everybody here does.  I get up in the morning, and I work as hard as I can, and my kids have turned out great. I’m a lucky enough guy to have made a lot of money, and I’m giving it all away and making a big difference.

Cover artist Barry Blitt also considered using Sarah Palin or Julian Assange for this Valentine’s Day issue, however he felt Bloomberg was the right man for the role.

Covering Barack: The New Yorker Vets the President-Elect

nyrkvet.png

Barry Blitt, the cartoonist responsible for the New Yorker‘s controversial terrorist fist-jabbing cover, among others, returns this week to “vet” Barack Obama. Of course this time around “Vetting” refers to the all important decision of picking a “first” puppy — thus far we know they want a mutt, but that it needs to be hypoallergenic and won’t be a girly dog. The cover may not be all that far off the mark, actually, turns out the original meaning of the word “vetting” was to to “submit an animal to examination by a veterinarian.”

Barry Blitt: A Modest Retrospective

blitt.jpgSo yeah, this week’s New Yorker cover. Everyone is shocked! shocked! Or at least everyone who works in a Presidential campaign. Obama (who recently approved Bush’s Constitutionally questionable warrantless wiretapping bill) thinks it’s “tasteless and offensive.” The McCain camp concurs. Totally understandable, since as we all know satire (part of that whole “freedom of speech” deal) is supposed to be in good taste. The conclusion here apparently being that Americans are too stupid to differentiate between satire and slander, and/or Obama supporters too thin-skinned to appreciate the humor (we happen to disagree on both counts, by the way).

One wonders if a similar cover of Hillary Clinton would have elicited such a response, or how about one of Hillary and Obama in bed together, or one of George Bush in an apron, or maybe a foreign head of state being propositioned in a men’s bathroom a la Larry Craig, or the entire Oval Office swimming in post-Katrina waters for that matter, or sailors kissing? Considering these are all subjects depicted on previous Barry Blitt New Yorker covers the answer would have to be no. Take a look for yourself after the jump.

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The New Yorker is Defending Political Humor?! Wow Are We In Trouble…

newyorker_7-14.JPG We just have to chime in on this New Yorker cover controversy. Rachel Sklar at Huffington Post really started this with her outrage about this week’s cover depicting Michelle and Barack Obama as Muslim terrorists – burning the flag under a portrait of Osama Bin Laden in the Oval Office.

She writes:

Who knows if they’ll get this in Dubuque, but they sure aren’t going to like it in Chicago.

As of this posting there are over 3100 comments of folks ‘not liking it’ – ranging from accusing the New Yorker of being a fascist right-wing rag to outright shaming the magazine for its choice to calls for a boycott. And if those aren’t enough, there are another 2000 at Politico for your more bipartisan enjoyment.

LAT blogger, Andrew Malcolm writes:

Of course, the McCain people must say that, despite some staff no doubt chuckling behind closed doors over their opponent’s new challenge. That’s the problem with satire. A lot of people won’t get the joke. Or won’t want to. And will use it for non-humorous purposes, which isn’t the New Yorker’s fault.

That’s not actually the problem with satire. That’s the problem with information. A lot of people won’t get that.

A satirist’s job – responsibility – sole purpose is to point out the absurd. The audience’s reaction isn’t the goal. Making left-wingers comfortable isn’t the goal. Quelling internet hysteria…yeah right.

Barry Blitt‘s cartoon is brilliant. We’ve been getting emails about Obama being a secret Muslim for over a year. And if Grama isn’t forwarding that to us – she’s sending out an email blast about his radical Christian preacher that hates America and white people. Just the fact that ‘terrorist fist jab’ is now in our lexicon because a television ‘journalist’ asked if a presidential candidate greeting his wife on stage was a sign of subversion – is proof that Obama’s opposition have lost their collective minds. And that’s what the cover does – connects those dots and draws a picture of how ridiculous Grama’s forwards (and E.D. Hill) are.

Of course, now Obama supporters are worried – terrified that a cartoon is dangerous and going to hurt the political process.

Proof that absurdity is a perennial bipartisan issue.