TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Bill Kristol’

Joe Nocera Changing Titles At The New York Times

After five-plus years as a business writer, Joe Nocera is making a move at The New York TimesJeff Bercovici reports that Nocera will join Nobel Prize winner Paul Krugman by contributing to NYT’s op-ed page.  The move makes Nocera the Times’s first new, full-time op-ed columnist since Ross Douthat replaced Bill Kristol in 2009.

Prior to joining the Grey Lady in 2005, Nocera spent over a decade as editorial director at Fortune magazine.  He has won two Gerald Loeb awards and three John Hancock awards to mark his achievements in business writing.  Nocera also was a Pulitzer Prize finalist this past year.

Mediabistro Course

Pitch Your Magazine Article

Pitch Your Magazine ArticleStarting October 1, learn how to write queries for magazines and websites! In this course, you'll learn how to write and send an effective pitch, generate pitch letters, research outlets for your articles, and follow-up with editors to ensure that your queries get results. Register now! 

Digitizing the Human Mind Seemed Like Such a Good Idea…Until Robot Bill Kristol Came Along

In this month’s issue, h+ Magazine profiles former U.S.C. grad student Ken Hayworth, whose ATLUM2 machine may eventually allow scientists to digitize the human mind. Right now, Hayworth’s device plasticizes mouse brains and slices them into two million pieces.

Using a special slicing device which Ken is also designing, the plasticized brain would be cut into approximately 400 sub-blocks. Each sub-block would then be loaded into Ken’s ATLUM2 and it would be cut into 5,000 incredibly thin slices. Each slice would be picked up on a long carbon-coated tape for later staining and imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Because the process is fully automated, volumes as large as tens of cubic millimeters (large enough to span entire multi-region neuronal circuits) can be quickly and reliably reduced to a tape of ultrathin sections.

Why would anyone do this?

At first, these devices will be used to section areas of the brain that are of particular interest to the individual researchers. The circuitry could be used to emulate those brain functions, run experiments emulating a brain section, and possibly even test pharmaceuticals or therapies. In the future, we might understand brain circuitry so well that such devices could be used to scan and “upload” an individual’s mind to any type of substrate (a new body, robot, or artificial environment). This Matrix-like immortality would be the ultimate backup of ourselves.

Dear god, do you realize what this might mean? A thousand year reign of America’s worst pundit Bill Kristol and his intellectually vacuous columns.

Terrifying.

Then again, give robot Bill Kristol infinity and he actually has a chance of getting something right.

H/T Exiledonline

The Writing’s On The Hand | Leno Exits Early Night | Phoenix Poachers | Google’s Buzz


Watch CBS News Videos Online

TVNewser: Everyone on TV is still making fun of Sarah Palin writing on her hand. Especially Robert Gibbs.

The New York Times: Tonight marks Jay Leno‘s departure from prime-time.

FishbowlDC: Esquire lit into Bill Kristol…but were they serious or just taking the piss?

The Boston Phoenix: Want to know why you’ve never heard of The Boston Phoenix? Because The New York Times keeps poaching all their talent.

TheWrap: Google unleashed new social network Buzz today, disses Yahoo.

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

Read more

Gazing Into the Kristol Ball: Thinking Outside the NYT Op-Ed Replacement Box

2286832_d960895d23.jpg
Over at Slate Jack Shafer thinks the perfect person to replace Bill Kristol‘s space on the New York Times op-ed page is no one! (Shafer says he’d be astonished if Kristol ever spent more than 45 minutes on a column.) Instead Shafer would prefer to see it as some sort of revolving space for guest op-eders he wouldn’t usually get to read.

The Times occasionally runs Op-Extra columnists in the print edition, which I consider a treat because I usually don’t get around to hunting for them on the Web. If either Egan or Judson moved into Kristol’s old space for a year, I wouldn’t kick, nor would I protest if the space was reserved for the best of the Op-Extra columnists.

Here’s one better.

Read more

Gazing Into the Kristol Ball: NYT Op-ed Page Guessing Game Continues

stephen-colbert.jpgThe guessing game continues as to who will replace Bill Kristol on the Times op-d page. NYMag.com thinks Stephen Colbert would be a great idea: “If the paper is smart, it’ll capitulate to its destiny and hire the ultimate nonconservative conservative, Stephen Colbert.” We’re not holding our breaths on that one, though Colbert is more appealing than, say, Bono.

Meanwhile it looks like National Review‘s Byron York, whose name had been bandied around as a possible replacement, is out of the running. FishbowlDC reports that York has accepted a position as chief political correspondent at the Washington Examiner where he will pen a twice-weekly column.

Alterman Moves to TheNation.com, Still Awaiting Times‘ Kristol Apology

item760555718.jpgEric Alterman has moved his blog Altercations over to TheNation.com from Media Matters. This is the third stop in over six years for the blog, having begun at MSNBC before moving over to Media Matters in 2006. In today’s post Alterman takes a swipe at newly departed Times columnist Bill Kristol.

When the Times was overwhelmed by complaints for the insult Kristol represented to its readership, editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal, speaking to Politico, dismissed all criticism of this “serious, respected conservative intellectual” as “intolerant,” “absurd,” and indicative of a “weird fear of opposing views.”

Read more

‘This is William Kristol’s Last Column’

kristol-190a.jpgAll good things must come to an end. Also Bill Kristol‘s (ambivalent) time at The New York Times — an appointment that has continued to puzzle and frustrate Times readers since it was announced over a year ago. In his last column Kristol declares that “Jan. 20, 2009, marked the end of a conservative era,” a tacked on to the end of the column notes that “This is Bill Kristol’s last column.” Who the Times will pick to fill the conservative space at the paper remains to be seen (anyone have suggestions? Ross Douthat and Megan McArdle are two names being bandied around).

Over at The Daily Beast Scott Horton speculates that the reason for Kristol’s departure has nothing to do with his neo-conservative views but with more “fundamental” problems.

Kristol’s writing wasn’t compelling or even very careful. He either lacked a talent for solid opinion journalism or wasn’t putting his heart into it.

On his Twitter feed Jay Rosen remarks that “The New York Times will be poorer, not for having dumped Bill Kristol, but for not explaining — even to itself — what went wrong, why he failed. So maybe a job for Clark Hoyt this week! Meanwhile it seems Kristol has landed on his feet (sort of).

Read more

Should Obama’s Next Dinner Chat Be Online?

OBAMA-COMPUTER_s1-274.jpgWho will Barack Obama wine and dine next? (Or coffee and chat if Bill Kristol is to be believed.) An interesting addition to yesterday’s liberal gabfest was Andrew Sullivan and not just because he now finds himself in the Liberal camp! Sullivan, while certainly established in the print world, primarily and successfully wields his influence online — unlike say, MoDo, or Tom Friedman, or Peggy Noonan, or any of the other pundits invited to these cozy chats whose presence online is merely a result of their print columns being posted.

All of which made us wonder whether Obama, as he prepares to usher in the so-called ‘Internet presidency,’ intends to have some sort of collective “chat” (iChat, Gchat, AIM?) with the opinion makers of the online world. Surely, in the coming four years the voice of the Internet, as it were were, will collectively prove to be at least as powerful as the op-ed pages of the nations largest newspapers (should they still be printing!). Suggestions who should be on that invite list?

Gazing Into the Kristol Ball

Over at Portfolio.com Jeff Bercovici points out the today marks the one year anniversary of the Times announcing they’d hired Bill Kristol for their op-ed page. No word yet on whether the Times intends to keep him on (or whether Kristol even wants to stay for that matter — he’s been a bit lukewarm about his employers). It’s hard to imagine them keeping Kristol, though they did hire him in the first place, so stranger things have happened. What say you readers? Should he stay or should he go?

Should NYT Keep Bill Kristol or Bid Him a Fond Farewell
( polls)

NEXT PAGE >>