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Posts Tagged ‘Blake Morrison’

Reuters Adds to Investigations Team

John Shiffman, an investigative reporter with the Philadelphia Inquirer since 2003, is joining Reuters’ investigation team on December 19.

At the Inquirer, Shiffman gained notoriety as the lead writer on a piece documenting how the Environmental Protection Agency was putting politics over science. The article was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 2009.

Shiffman will be based in Washington and report to Investigative Projects Editor Blake Morrison.

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LA Times Pulitzer Winner Set for Wisconsin Residency

Senior LA Times reporter Jeff Gottlieb, who along with Ruben Vives won a Pulitzer Prize for the pair’s 2010 series on endemic Bell city corruption, will be at the University of Wiconsin-Madison next week as the school’s latest public affairs writer in residence.

FishbowlLA reviewed Gottlieb’s schedule and it looks like the journalism faculty will be keeping him very busy. On Monday for example, there is a morning class with a room full of junior and senior students, a brown bag off-campus lunch with employees of the Capital Times and Wisconsin State Journal, an afternoon session with Master’s students and dinner at the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Wednesday night, Gottlieb will talk at members of the local chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists about “How Ruben and I Found the Bell Story.” Many in the audience for this evening event will once again connect him to Madison’s local papers.

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USA Today Loses Editor to Reuters

Blake Morrison, who has been with USA Today for 12 years, is leaving his position as the paper’s Investigations Editor for Reuters. At Reuters he will be Investigative Projects Editor.

A memo obtained by Poynter states that Morrison will be based here and report directly to Reuters’ Global Enterprise Editor, Michael Williams.

Columbia Awards USA TODAY Reporters Environmental Journalism Award

toxic air.jpg

An investigative piece into toxic air around America’s schools has garnered a 2009 John B. Oakes Award for two USA TODAY reporters.

The Columbia Graduate School of Journalism announced today that Blake Morrison and Brad Heath will be the recipients of this year’s Oakes Award, which honors excellence in environmental journalism. The award recognizes the reporters’ work on the investigative series “The Smokestack Effect: Toxic Air and America’s Schools” and it’s companion Web site, which allows readers to search for their schools and discover the level of toxic air in its area. The series resulted in the Environmental Protection Agency launching a $2.25 million program to monitor the air quality around schools.

“By yoking the locations of private and pubic schools around the country with an EPA model for tracking toxic chemicals, the reporters identified hundreds of schools where children seemed to be at risk,” the Oakes Award judges’ said. “As a result, the EPA and local environmental agencies began to do what they should have been doing for years: paying attention to the environment in which our children live and learn.”

Second prize has been awarded to The New York Times series “Toxic Waters” written by Charles Duhigg.

The winners will receive their awards and speak on a panel about their work at the Oakes Award luncheon on March 30 at Columbia.

Full release after the jump

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USA TODAY Reporters Win Environmental Reporting Award

The University of Rhode Island’s Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting yesterday announced the winners of its Grantham Prize for Excellence in Reporting on the Environment — USA TODAY‘s Blake Morrison and Brad Heath. The reporters snagged the top prize, and $75,000, for their investigative series “The Smokestack Effect,” which examined industrial pollution near schools.

Three groups of reporters also received special merit awards and $5,000: Tad Fettig, Karena Albers and Veronique Bernard of kontentreal, for their six-part series about global transportation “e2: transport,” which ran on PBS; Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporters Susanne Rust and Meg Kissinger for their series “Chemical Fallout”; and author Andrew Nikiforuk for his book “Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent.”

The prize was founded by Jeremy and Hannelore Grantham in 2005 through the Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment, which supports environmental research and conservation programs around the world.

The prizes winners will give an overview of their award-winning work at the 2009 Grantham Prize Seminar in October in Washington, D.C.

Full release after the jump

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