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Posts Tagged ‘Cablevision’

Cablevision Proposes Tough Concessions For Newsday Employees

newsday.750.jpgWhen will publishers learn: you never, ever want to mess with the drivers who are delivering your papers?

Then again, the latest company in question is Cablevision and they are talking about slashing 15 percent from what they pay drivers delivering their 2008 acquisition, Newsday, which notably is trying to drum up readers for their pay-walled site. So maybe if all the unionized drivers quit (Newsday in particular has a history of cutting delivery drivers), everyone who wants local Long Island news will have to do so by paying the online subscription fee?

Still, even without the drivers’ pay cut, the deal isn’t doing anybody any favors: the proposal includes longer work weeks, less vacation time and an average 10 percent pay cut for every union employee. Romenesko obtained a copy of the editorial union memo, which calls the deal “horrible and unprecedented.New York Post‘s Keith Kelly wrangled a devil’s advocate quote from Michael O’Connor (president of the local chapter of the Graphic Communications International Union), who said, “I think this is the best we are going to extract from Newsday at this time…I know a lot of people are upset, but everyone has to look at their options.”

Union members can vote on the proposal starting Sunday, January 10, only three months before 250 contracts for editorial employees at Newsday go up for review.

Read More: Newsday Asks Employees For ‘Horrible and Unprecedented’ Concessions –MediaJobsDaily

Cablevision to cut Newsday’s pay, vacationsNew York Post

Newsday union asks members to vote on “horrible and unprecedented” contract terms –Romenesko

Related: Newsday.com Sees Pay Wall-Induced Drop In Traffic

Fee Negotiations Drive Food Network, HGTV From Cablevision

ilovefood.jpg

Well, we Time Warner Cable subscribers may not have to live without Fox, thanks to last-minute negotiations between News Corp. and Time Warner, but millions of Cablevision subscribers in the tri-state area have lost access to Food Network and HGTV.

While the battle over subscriber fees between News Corp. and Time Warner raged publicly in the days leading up to the New Year’s Eve contract deadline, Scripps Networks Interactive, which owns the two yanked channels, was quietly dealing with Cablevision. And the latter negotiations didn’t end as pleasantly as the others. Although Scripps says it “remains open to discussions,” Cablevision “has yet to engage in good faith negotiations for their subscribers.”

In the face of losing their culinary TV and home improvement channel, Cablevision subscribers are fighting back with over 120,000 calls and 35,000 e-cards sent to the cable provider, Scripps said in a press release today. The company has set up the Web sites ilovefoodnetwork.com and ilovehgtv.com for Cablevision subscribers to log on and send messages of “outrage and disappointment” to the company.

It comes as no surprise to us that Cablevision’s 3 million subscribers are missing their Food Network fix. And if you find yourself agreeing with us, you might want to check out some Food Network alternatives. Some of our favorite Web sites are crowd-sourced cookbook food52.com and local culinary faves like Edible Brooklyn, Edible Manhattan and Edible Queens. And epicurean magazines abound, from classics like Bon Appetit to the sleek Saveur to even Food Network Magazine, if you’re missing the channel. What are some of your favorite foodie media outlets?

All this week, mediabistro.com is featuring foodie-related content as part of its Profit From Your Passion Month. Today, learn about four gigs that can open the door to a career in food media. Just because you can’t watch Food Network right now doesn’t mean you can’t work towards starring on it one day!

Previously: January Is Profit From Your Passion Month

Newsday, Observer Name New Editors

Debby Krenek.jpgIt’s a Friday afternoon a few weeks before the end of the year, but that hasn’t stopped two New York-area papers from announcing moves at the tops of their mastheads.

The latest editor of The New York Observer, Kyle Pope, named Christopher Stewart the paper’s deputy editor, according to a memo obtained by Romenesko. The two formerly worked together at Portfolio magazine, where Pope was one of two top editors and Stewart was a contributing editor. Pope was named editor of Observer last month.

Also today, Long Island newspaper Newsday announced a changing of the guard atop its masthead, as managing editor and senior VP of digital media Debby Krenek (pictured) was picked to succeed editor-in-chief John Mancini, who resigned.

Cablevision-owned Newsday‘s former publisher Tim Knight, resigned in September, with Terry Jiminez, the publisher of amNY, which is also owned by Cablevision, stepping in to replace him.

Full release about Krenek, after the jump

Christopher Stewart named NYO deputy editor –Romenesko

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Newsday Columnist Takes A Stand Against Paid Content

3814467826.jpgWe’ve known since February that Newsday.com was going to be put behind a paywall so its parent company Cablevision could see if any of that Wall Street Journal magic could rub off on them and actually get users to pay for online content. Two weeks ago, the company announced its payment plan: $5 a week for full access to their online edition, unless you were already a subscriber to the Long Island paper or its parent company’s Optimum Internet service. And considering that Newsday‘s most recent circ numbers have fallen 5.4 percent, Cablevision can use all the extra cash from the publication it acquired last year that it can get.

But not all writers agree: Saul Friedman, a columnist at Newsday for over a decade, quit the paper last week in protest of the publication’s paywall, which went into effect last week. Friedman’s column in the paper, “Gray Matters,” dealt with the topic of aging, ironically something that print journalism can’t seem to find a way to do gracefully as more and more consumers turn to the Internet for free content.

Friedman’s full memo about his reasons for leaving, posted on Romenesko, after the jump.

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FBNY Poll: What Content Would You Be Willing To Pay For Online?

This week, two newspapers announced two very different paywall plans. The Wall Street Journal unveiled a new plan to provide specially aggregated content to “professionals” for up to $49 a month, drawing from WSJ.com, Dow Jones newswires and Factiva.

Local Long Island newspaper Newsday also revealed expected plans to roll out a paywall for its Web site next week. The Cablevision-owned paper’s online content will remain free to print subscribers and those who pay for Optimum Online service, but everyone else will have to pay $5 a week for access.

Whether or not either of these models will work, media companies will continue to test the waters with plans to make you pay for the content you want most. So we wonder, what would you be willing to pay for? WSJ seems to think there’s money in specially aggregated content while Newsday is banking on a need for local news, even for just a week at a time.

What do you think? Weigh in below. (You can pick more than one choice)


What content would be be willing to pay for online?(polling)

Newsday Prepares To Go Behind Paywall Next Week

newsday1022.jpgCablevision-owned Long Island paper Newsday is preparing to go behind a paywall on October 28.

Although Newsday announced plans to charge for its online content earlier this year, we just noticed a note about it on the site this morning.

Access to Newsday.com will be free to current Newsday subscribers as well as those who get their Internet access through Cablevision’s Optimum Online, and the site is currently asking all visitors to register before the paywall goes up. Anyone else will have to pay $5 a week for limited access to the site, and there will also be an e-edition option that will cost $19 for a four-week subscription to $195 for a year.

Newsday has made a number of changes in recent months, updating its logo and front page and revamping its Web site. Last month, the paper’s publisher Tim Knight resigned from his post, and Terry Jimenez, the publisher of amNewYork, the free paper also owned by Cablevision, was appointed to take his place.

Earlier: Newsday, San Francisco Chronicle To Start Charging For Online Content

Newsday Publisher Knight Resigns After 5 Years

knight.jpgTim Knight, the publisher of Cablevision-owned Long Island newspaper Newsday has resigned from his post. He will be replaced by Terry Jimenez, the publisher of amNewYork, the free paper also owned by Cablevision. Jiminez will now serve as Newsday‘s acting publisher, although Knight said he would stay on until November 1 to help with the transition.

In a letter sent to staffers yesterday, Knight touched on some of the challenges he has faced as publisher in the last five years:

“I am proud, as a team, we successfully addressed the circulation
misstatements and, in the process, strengthened relationships with our
advertisers as well as created a stronger circulation department. We
undertook a number of changes to the paper to better focus our
resources on providing Long Islanders with unique and valuable local
news and information. A recent effort by the newsroom to expose the
abuse surrounding the state pension system resulted in widespread
changes to better protect taxpayers. And, importantly, we recently
re-launched newsday.com, which will allow us to better provide our
subscribers with a unique and valuable multimedia web experience.”

However, beyond saying it was “the right time to let others move our business forward,” Knight did not give a reason for his departure. You can read more of Knight’s memo, as well as a memo from Tad Smith, president of Cablevision’s local media unit, after the jump.

Since Cablevision purchased Newsday last year, the paper has undergone a number of changes, from a new layout (that looks more like amNewYork), to a new Web site, launched in July.

Newsday Publisher Tim Knight ResignsNewsday

Related: Newsday Revamps Web Site

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Daytime Emmy Winners|Newsday Says No To Verizon|More Magazines Launch In Bad Economy|Magazines Try New Cover Ad Tricks|Chris Wragge On Working Your Way Up

TVNewser: ABC had a good year at the Daytime Emmy Awards yesterday. “Good Morning America” took home the “Outstanding Morning Program” prize for the third year in a row and “The View” was honored for “Outstanding Talk Show Host.”

New York Times: Newsday is being picky about its advertising. It has rejected ads from Verizon, which is a direct competitor of the paper’s parent company, Cablevision.

Folio: Despite the economy, more magazines are launching.

Mediaweek: As they struggle to find new ways to sell ads, magazines are trying lots of new cover ad gimmicks.

Examiner: WCBS anchor Chris Wragge has climbed from weeknight sports anchor to part of the main anchor team at 5 and 11 p.m.

One Last Thought On Robert Novak|Newsday Rejects Ad Chastising Parent Co.|Time Inc. Buys Detroit Home|More Reaction To Reader’s Digest Ch. 11 News|Is Anyone Profiting From Gawker’s Threesome Video?

FishbowlDC: One final thought about Robert Novak‘s death today: “There’s no question if you walked out of here and I dropped dead, my obit would probably have [the Plame affair] in the lede.”

New York Times: Cablevision-owned Newsday has rejected an ad by the Tennis Channel chastising the cable provider for not carrying the network.

Detroit Free Press: Time Inc. has purchased a house in Detroit’s West Village that will serve as the media company’s home base as it covers the Michigan city’s struggles to survive the recession.

Paid Content: More reactions to the news that Reader’s Digest Association will likely file for Chapter 11.

Mediaite: The NSFW Eric Dane-Rebecca Gayheart threesome video is racking up big page views for Gawker. But since Nick Denton reinstated page view bonuses at the Web media company, is anyone profiting from the onslaught of clicks? Unfortunately, the popular post’s writer, Gabriel Snyder, is Gawker’s managing editor, so he’s not eligible for the page view bonus, although he will get a bonus for overall increased traffic to the site.

Newsday Revamps Web Site

newsday site.pngAlmost two months after debuting a new look in print, Long Island newspaper Newsday is showing off a Web site revamp today at Newsday.com.

The new look completes the paper’s transition from former owner Tribune, after Cablevision purchased the pub last year. Newsday is also asking for your feedback on the new look. Take this survey and you’ll be entered in a drawing for ten $100 prizes.

What do you think of the new look?

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