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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Batty’

Atlantic Media’s Business Vertical Grabs Former Gawker Vet

The pieces are slowly coming together for Atlantic Media’s business vertical, which is launching later this year. Kevin Delaney and Zach Seward came aboard in January and February respectively, and now Chris Batty, a former veteran of Gawker Media, has been named Publisher of the business venture.

Batty tells Ad Age that the new site will take aim at two lofty brands. “We’re still doing our deep dive on our brand DNA but it’s not going to be something that people recognize as totally foreign from The Atlantic,” Batty explains. “It will have extremely high-quality content and advertising programming. The brand is global — it’s really a run at the space at The Economist and The Financial Times currently occupy.”

Might as well aim high, right?

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With A 35 Percent Increase In Ad Revenues, Gawker Reinstates Pageview Bonuses

gawker l ogo.pngLast year was a tough one for Gawker Media. But as publisher Nick Denton told Nieman Journalism Lab yesterday, the first half of 2009 has been better than expected. In fact, with a 35 percent increase in ad revenue during the first six months of the year, compared to 2008, Denton is once again offering his writers bonuses for surpassing pageview targets — a feature of the newsroom that was cut during last year’s cost-slashing efforts.

What’s more, Denton said reinstating pageview pay also opened up “the possibility of web-style checkbook journalism,” meaning Gawker will pay tipsters based on the number of pageviews a story based on their tips generates. It’s something the controversial new media company tried last year, when it offered tipsters $7.50 for every 1,000 pageviews a story reached.

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‘True’ Confession: We Talk to Ad Sales All The Time

a1a11111111.jpgWe really don’t do this often — oh, screw it: I’m not even using that blog convention of the royal ‘we’ for this one. It’s me, managing editor Rebecca Fox, speaking on behalf of my mediabistro.com editorial colleagues in a rare fit of first-person. I’m here to tell you something I hope, for the sake of the larger media world, will stop sounding shocking someday soon…

We here in mb editorial talk to our advertising team All.The.Time. We trust them, we rely upon them, we like them. Do they dictate what we do and don’t cover? No way. Do we stay abreast of what they’re working on, as it pertains to the content we work so hard to produce, day in and day out? Abso-freakin’-lutely. And that relationship makes what each of our teams is trying to accomplish run better.

They tell us about novel campaigns and initiatives they’re working on, we apprise them of new and interesting things we’re doing, and in doing so, we roundly reject the notion of ‘never the twain shall meet’ that we’re seeing so much of this week, courtesy of the still-sputtering controversy over Gawker Media’s partnership with HBO that begat ‘BloodCopy,’ the recent Gawker blog acquisition that wasn’t. Best of all, mb salespeople come to us of their own accord to ensure nothing they’re planning or have executed, sponsorship- or sales-wise, scans as even remotely questionable or corrosive to the journalistic credibility that is central to what we do.

We believe that being in constant communication with those charged with selling our content makes our business better. Not just from a sales standpoint, but more importantly: it shores up the integrity we know we can continue to proudly associate with our content. Simply put: We know they’re not messing with what we do in a way that makes us feel icky. Furthermore, we think edit folk who say they don’t interact with their sales teams are either full of it, or not doing the smartest thing with their business in this new (as in ‘novel,’ not necessarily ‘online’ — though the two obviously converge) media world in which we all now reside.

Old-line church-and-state boundaries between advertising and editorial are undergoing a transformation. Here’s why that’s not such a bad thing what’s best for the media business…

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