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Posts Tagged ‘Christine Vachon’

Killer Films Gets A Killer Investment

christinevachon.jpgWho says money can’t buy happiness? In the indie world anyway.

Killer Films, the upstart indie producer of such low-budget films as “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Far From Heaven,” has sold off half of itself to New York-based venture capital fund GC Corp, Variety says.

With this influx of cash, partners Christine Vachon and Pam Koffler, who are mainstays at events like the Gotham Awards and the Independent Spirit Awards, will go from making $3 million to $5 million indie projects to $40 million to $50 million films.

Killer had been partnered with “ER” creator John Wells, who will stay on as an executive producer for Killer releases.

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Sundance Gold, Real World Blues: Scott Foundas in LA Weekly

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Scott Foundas writes of the coulda, shoulda, woulda world of those filmmakers whose Sundance acclaim didn’t catapult them into the big time. Or even a steady gig. Here’s the stats:

Of the 290 dramatic features that played at Sundance between 1984 and 2002 (the last year it seemed prudent to include in this survey, given the amount of time it can take to set up an indie film), 156 of their directors have gone on to make zero or, at the most, one additional dramatic feature.

In his LA Weekly piece, Foundas recounts the cautionary tale of Gary Walkow, who’ll show his latest work, Crashing, at Slamdance. Walkow, who has more than his fair share of bad luck for one lifetime, had a festival hit, The Trouble With Dick, sold it to a small company who folded before releasing the film. And then he made another film, went to Sundance, and watched the heavy-hitters engage in a bidding war over Shine. And he’s doing this again.

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