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Posts Tagged ‘Condé Nast Traveler’

Marie Claire Publisher Plagemann Jumps To Vogue, Florio’s Role Expanded

vogue cover.jpgThe latest Condé Nast restructuring news comes to the top of one of the company’s highest profile pubs.

Susan Plagemann, the publisher at Hearst’s Marie Claire since 2004, has been named the newest publisher at Vogue, effective January 4.

Although she started her career at Condé Nast in the advertising department at Mademoiselle, Plagemann has spent most of her career at Hearst, working for Esquire, Cosmopolitan, the now-defunct Lifetime and then Marie Claire.

Plagemann will report to Thomas Florio, who formerly held the role of publisher at Vogue. His role has now been expanded to oversee Vogue and Teen Vogue, Bon Appétit and Condé Nast Traveler.

As The New York Observer reports, this seems to be part of Condé Nast’s McKinsey-ordered plan to create a more clearly defined reporting structure for publishers, through the creation of “super publishers” that now include Florio, Bill Wackermann (who now oversees Glamour, Details and Brides), Richard Beckman (Fairchild Group and W) and David Carey (Wired, The New Yorker and the golf group).

Full release about Plagemann, after the jump

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NYT‘s New Bay Area Blog|Playboy Cuts Rate Base|Us Weekly Officially Names Min’s Successor|Condé Nast Traveler Pairs With Gilt Groupe

BayNewser: The New York Times has launched a Bay Area blog to go along with its recently launched Bay Area section in its local print edition.

Mediaweek: Playboy will cut is rate base starting in January from 2.6 million to 1.5 million.

New York Post: Jann Wenner has made it official: Michael Steele, who has been leading Wenner title Us Weekly since Janice Min‘s departure this summer, can now remove the word “acting” before his title of editor-in-chief.

New York Times: In an effort to look for new forms of revenue, Condé Nast Traveler is pairing with upscale discount online retailer Gilt Groupe to sell discounted travel deals.

Rolling Stone‘s Obama Cover Wins ASME Prize

rolling stone obama.jpgToday we’re at the Magazine Publishers of America‘s Magazine Innovation Summit, where ASME President David Willey just announced the winners of its best cover of the year contest in 10 categories.

The overall winner this year was Rolling Stone, which also won for the Best Obama cover category. Other category winners included Bon Appetit, Elle, Audubon, Sports Illustrated, Vanity Fair, Veranda, Harper’s Bazaar, Condé Nast Traveler and New York magazine.

More Magazine Innovation Summit coverage to come.

Related: ASME Launches Best Cover Of The Year Contest

What’s Left At Condé Nast?

conde nast logo.jpgCondé Nast is one of the largest magazine publishers in the U.S., and the news earlier this week that it was shuttering four titles really didn’t change that.

Condé still has 18 consumer magazine titles, plus two trades — WWD and Footwear News — under its Fairchild Publications arm. But the company had been working hard to streamline it portfolio in the past year. In addition to Cookie, Gourmet, Modern Bride and Elegant Bride, which all folded this week, the company has shuttered several titles this year. Men’s Vogue went a year ago, followed by men’s wear trade pub DNR (our former home), Domino and then Portfolio

So what’s left?

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Layoffs On The Horizon For Condé Nast?

4 times square.jpgWith McKinsey & Co. wrapping up its work at Condé Nast, the vultures are out. Severe budget cuts are a given, and layoffs are not too much of a stretch. The question is: which publications will be hardest hit?

Last week, we reported that publishers were likely going to be asked to cut their budgets by 25 percent. That same number has shown up in articles in Crain’s New York Business and The New York Observer.

According to Crain’s, publishers have already started meeting with the company’s Chief Operating Officer John Bellando, although the actual cutting may not start until October. Reports Crain’s:

“The meetings with Mr. Bellando, which began last week and are continuing through this week, are aimed at reducing budgets at each of the company’s titles by an average of 25 percent, sources say. The editors and publishers, who will be in charge of cutting from their respective departments, will have two to three weeks to submit their budgets for approval. Staff and spending cuts could soon follow.”

The Observer reports that leaders at Details, Condé Nast Traveler and Glamour have already had meetings where they have been asked to cut budgets by about 25 percent. Gourmet and Teen Vogue have also reportedly had similar meetings where they were asked to make the same cuts. However, as previously reported, The New Yorker is immune to these cuts, The Observer said.

There is one upside: neither of these insider reports mention any titles as being at risk for closure. If these reports are to be trusted, it looks like all of Condé Nast’s remaining titles could escape the chopping block. However, their staffers may not be as lucky.

Condé Nast execs expected to cut 25%Crain’s New York Business

McKinsey Proffers Pie Graphs: Several Condé Mags to Cut “25-ish Percent”The Observer

Earlier: Could Condé Nast Cut Budgets By 25 Percent?

Condé Nast Traveler Shows Travel Industry How To Save The World

world savers.jpgToday, we spent some time at Condé Nast Traveler‘s World Savers Congress, a conference that gathered members of the tourism and travel industries that are trying to make a difference in the world through conservation, sustainability and other philanthropic efforts, along with other companies and philanthropists that share their vision and goals.

We were drawn to the conference by special guest speakers Mandy Moore, Wyclef Jean and Edward Norton — all inspiring philanthropists and world travelers — but there were some media personalities there as well. CNT‘s editor-in-chief Klara Glowczewska opened the event by welcoming everyone and served as master of ceremonies throughout. “We’re at the dawn of a new era,” she said “Business will be transformed, and ultimately in the best possible ways.”

New York Times columnist and author Nicholas Kristof moderated the first panel of the day, featuring TOMS Shoes CEO Blake Mycoskie and Rachel Webber, the director of energy initiatives for Rupert Murdoch‘s News Corp. Although News Corp.’s energy initiatives grew out of the desire to streamline their business expenses, they now realize that folding socially conscious initiatives into their business model can improve the brand’s reputation around the world, Webber said.

Later, documentarian Ken Burns previewed his latest project, “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea”. You can check out a clip here.

Then, over lunch we sat at the bloggers’ table with CNT bloggers Julia Bainbridge, Mollie Chen and Wendy Perrin, Jen Leo of The Los Angeles Times and bloggers Todd Lucier, Aimee Barnes and Elliott Ng (who snapped some great photos of the event).

bloggers.jpg

After lunch, Norton spoke to the crowd about his travels and various philanthropic works. He spoke at length about the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust in Eastern Africa, where he serves as president of the board. Norton says he primarily helps the trust raise money that is then invested back into conservation, education and health care programs in the Maasai community. Right now, the New York resident is training to run the New York Marathon on November 1 with three Maasai warriors. All the funds raised in support of his run will go back to the Maasai, he said. Come marathon day, we’ll be keeping an eye out for Norton and his Maasai running buddies.

Overall, all the talk about sustainability and conservation and saving the world got us thinking: what can we do to give back? Give us some ideas. What are some ways you give back to the community and help the world at large?

After the jump, more photos of the day’s event

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McKinsey Wraps Up At Condé Nast

4timessquare.jpgToday we have another dispatch about McKinsey’s work at Condé Nast from The New York Observer‘s John Koblin.

Koblin, who has been reporting on McKinsey’s work throughout the summer, reports that the consulting company is ready to wrap up its investigation of the state of Condé’s business and will present their findings to the company’s executives soon:

The Observer has learned that McKinsey consultants are winding down their tour of Condé Nast, and will be ready to submit their final recommendations to chairman Si Newhouse and CEO Chuck Townsend in the coming weeks. One source said that recommendations could begin as early as Sept. 16, but another well-placed source said that the ‘totality of their recommendations’ will be given at all once, and that they would come down in the next two to three weeks.”

Although the consultants have taken a close look at Vogue and Condé Nast Traveler Koblin suggests that the magazines most in danger of being designated by McKinsey as “frequency reductions” are epicurean titles Gourmet and Bon Appetit and men’s mags GQ and Details.

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McKinsey Takes A Look At Vogue, Traveler

vogue sept.jpgThe New York Observer‘s John Koblin continues his coverage of McKinsey & Co.’s examination of Condé Nast with an article today about the consultants’ recent look at Vogue and Condé Nast Traveler.

Koblin reports that the two magazines are supposedly being used as studies that will shape the company-wide recommendations McKinsey will provide later this year:

“The two magazines are believed to be representative business units for the entire company. Vogue, the ad-heavy breadwinner, is seen as being reflective of a bigger magazine. Traveler, with its moderately hefty staff, is smaller than Vogue and considered reflective of a midsize magazine.”

Meanwhile, other sources tell Koblin that even more titles have been getting visits from McKinsey or are gearing up for sit downs soon, including GQ and Glamour. “It is also likely that McKinsey will be spending time with titles that have a smaller profile than Vogue, and with a much bleaker bottom line,” Koblin surmises. “In other words: The magazines whose prospects might not be so hot.”

Hey, Condé Nast employees, what are you seeing around 4 Times Square? If you have any tips or thoughts about what’s happening over there, leave a comment or anonymous tip (in the box at right) or send us an email.

Vogue, Traveler Get Thorough Exams, Courtesy of McKinsey Observer

Earlier coverage on FBNY: Mourning The Loss of Condé Nast’s “Gilded Age”