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Posts Tagged ‘copyright infringement’

Morning Media Newsfeed: MSNBC Announces New Shows | Tarantino Sues Gawker | Van Susteren Blasts Pundit

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MSNBC Shaking Up Daytime Schedule (TVNewser)
MSNBC is announcing major changes to its daytime lineup. Cable news newcomer Ronan Farrow will host his new show at 1 p.m. ET, sources tell TVNewser, while Joy Reid, the managing editor of NBC’s TheGrio.com, who has been filling in on MSNBC, is expected to be named host at 2. p. m. ET. Tamron Hall, who currently anchors NewsNation at 2 p.m., is negotiating a new contract that would give her an expanded role at the Today show while also keeping her on the MSNBC schedule. Meanwhile, the noon hour has seen fill-in anchors since Alex Wagner moved to 4 p.m. two weeks ago. TVNewser News in the morning. Opinion in the afternoon. That sums up the changes coming to MSNBC’s daytime schedule. The afternoon additions will also create flow in the mornings where Morning Joe leads into Chuck Todd’s DC-based politics hour, followed by Chris Jansing’s newscast. Hall’s NewsNation follows at 11 a.m. with Andrea Mitchell moving back an hour to noon. “Andrea Mitchell is so critical to MSNBC and I’ve always thought her show should be at noon,” MSNBC president Phil Griffin says. “Andrea brings on the biggest newsmakers of the day and the new time slot will help showcase her work.” NYT The network, which will be on a break from its usual lineup to cover the Winter Olympics starting in two weeks, will introduce Farrow as host of the 1 p.m. hour starting Feb. 24. Farrow, the 26-year-old son of Mia Farrow and Woody Allen, has already amassed a long résumé, including being a Rhodes Scholar and a Yale Law School graduate, and a stint in the Obama administration. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media In his memo to staff, Griffin commended MSNBC for getting off to “a great start in 2014.” “We’ve broken news, done important reporting and lead the way on a variety of stories this month And the audience has responded with some of our highest ratings since the 2012 election,” he wrote. “I’m proud of the fantastic work all our teams are doing, particularly those of you who have been juggling multiple assignments. Thank you for your hard work and flexibility.”

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A Legal Point Of View On The Gawker Sex Tape Lawsuit

gawker media case.jpgThe copyright infringement lawsuit against Gawker Media filed earlier this week by celebrities Eric Dane and Rebecca Gayheart raised a number of legal questions for bloggers and the media. We wanted answers, so we asked Jonathan D. Reichman, a partner at intellectual property law firm Kenyon & Kenyon specializing in copyright law, to weigh in on the merits of the case.

After reading the suit, which Gawker posted online, Reichman said he was surprised Dane and Gayheart went after the media company for copyright infringement instead of other claims, like invasion of privacy or violation of right of publicity, which is a celebrity’s right to control how his likeness is used commercially.

“The unique thing about this case is that Eric and Rebecca are putting all of their eggs in the copyright infringement basket,” Reichman said. “They could have sued for publicity rights or privacy rights. Usually in these cases you see celebrities alleging defamation or liable or slander. I don’t see any of those claims.”

Reichman said that if he were Dane and Gayheart’s attorney, he would have at least added the additional claims for good measure. What Dane and Gayheart’s attorney Martin Singer did do, however, was register their sex tape with the Library of Congress and obtain a copyright. Reichman said that obtaining a copyright is fairly easy and copyright infringement is “an easy claim to assert, on paper.”

But will it hold up in court? And what defenses does Gawker have against it? Reichman explains, and suggests what Gawker’s next steps should be, after the jump.

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