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Posts Tagged ‘Domino’

Swine Flu Hits Conde Nast As Newhouse Profile Hits Newsstands

nymag.pngThis morning, a warning went out to all of Conde Nast‘s New York employees that an employee on the 12th floor of the company’s 4 Times Square headquarters had tested positive for swine flu. (If you’re hip to Conde HQ you know that floor is where Vogue is housed.)

But since the memo noted that the infected employee is “under a doctor’s care and currently recovering at home,” the media company was probably more worried this morning about the latest New York magazine cover story, which profiled Conde chairman Si Newhouse.

Steve Fishman‘s in-depth profile attempts to get to the heart of Newhouse’s psyche, quoting an anonymous source who calls him “semi-blank,” and asserting that he surrounds himself with superstar editors who represent a part of himself that he can’t express on his own. “In a sense, he’s like a polished surface, and the editors tend to see themselves in him,” Fishman wrote.

And of course Fishman can’t ignore the fact that Conde Nast is in the red despite closing a number of magazines in the past two years, including, most recently, Portfolio. Still, he points out that “The belief around the building is that next year, if the economy recovers, Conde Nast will again turn profitable.” Fishman doesn’t let on if he agrees, but he does mention that there are still rumors of more magazine closings to come. “Which will be next? Wired? Architectural Digest? Does the company really need two food magazines?”

As a former Conde employee ourselves, we did find at least one omission in Fishman’s reporting. His list of shuttered publications — Jane, House & Garden, Men’s Vogue, Golf for Women, Domino and Portfolio — he left out our former home, the men’s wear trade DNR.

Former Domino Staffers Sell Leftovers

domino_cover.jpg When the magazine we were working for folded, the thought of selling all our accumulated swag for a few extra bucks naturally came up. But that sad little rummage sale would never have been able to compete with the Greenwich Village tag sale being organized by former staffers of the dearly departed shelter magazine Domino.

Former editors and friends have collected leftover props like a French 18th-century farm stool (on sale for $90), textiles and chairs to sell alongside the contents of their storerooms and closets.

None of this seems too surprising in the current economic climate, but we were confused by a comment former Domino editor-in-chief Deborah Needleman made to The New York Times. She revealed she would be selling some of her clothes, including luxe pieces by Lanvin, Prada and Chloe or “fancy party frocks from a nice former life I happily don’t have anymore.”

Are you happy to be unemployed? Happy not to have to dress up any more? Deborah, please explain. Another question: who gets to keep the cash for stuff that was probably given to the magazine for free?

And if you find yourself in the Village on Saturday, let us know what you find.

Earlier: Conde Nast Shutters Domino

Would You Pay to Keep Domino Online?

dominogg.pngThere was a louder than usual outcry yesterday at the news that Conde Nast was folding its upscale shelter magazine Domino, with many people expressing dismay that the website, Dominomag.com, would also go dark.

Of course, this follows all the recent chatter regarding Conde Nast‘s lack of investment in their website properties beyond using them as a device with which to further subscription sale, so it’s not a total surprise the website will go down also. However, it got us thinking — would people be willing to pay a smaller subscription fee for access to a content-rich website, should a company decide to keep it running in lieu of the printed magazine? What say you readers? We suspect this financial crisis will see the end of free content across the board, and perhaps the disappearance of magazines with devoted followings, such as Domino, may be just the thing to kickstart people into paying for access.

Would you pay a subscription fee for a website whose print version has been shuttered?
( polls)

Time Inc. in Price Hike Showdown With Burkle Company

pe_2termmicro0109_peoplecover_205x273.jpgUnlike, say, Conde Nast — who amidst the outcry over the closure of Domino may be wishing very much they had invested in their web properties prior to “seeing the religion” as a result of the financial collapse — Time Inc., as we mentioned yesterday, is doing fairly well online. They also have a whole batter of magazines that continue to sell — People is the nation’s top newsweekly. So plenty of folks in the media world had their eyes on how Time Inc. would react to Ron Burkle‘s Source Interlink’s decision to put a seven cent per-copy surcharge on all publications it delivers to retailers beginning next week! Turns out Time Inc. isn’t having it.

“Time Inc. has basically told Source to drop dead,” said one industry veteran… “I don’t think copies will be shipped next week,” said one publishing executive. “It is kind of like a labor dispute. There will be blood.”

Magazine people, reeling from the recession, are unsympathetic to the plight of the wholesalers, claiming they got into this mess by aggressively trying to gain market share in the distribution business.

Of course, as Liz Claman pointed out on this morning’s Menu, there is plenty of negotiating room to be found between seven cents and zero.

Conde Nast Shutters Domino

dominogg.pngA tipster wrote us a short time ago that rumors were swirling Conde Nast’s Domino had been shuttered, and sadly, it has just been made official. The company just released a statement saying the magazine’s March issue will be its last.

Says Conde CEO and president Charles Townsend: “This decision to cease publication of the magazine and its website is driven entirely by the economy…Although readership and advertising response was encouraging in the early years, we have concluded that this economic market will not support our business expectations.” Full release after the jump.

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