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Posts Tagged ‘editors’

Earn up to $2 a Word at the Newly Revamped Woman’s Day

womans-day-january-2014Woman’s Day magazine has been around for 75 years, so naturally there have been some changes to the format, tone and style of the pub. But since its 2012 redesign, editors say the mag is more focused than ever on adding value to their readers’ lives — whether it be money-saving tips, recipes or health news.

The pub is ready for fresh new writers, and there are plenty of opportunities for freelancers (including contributing to Womansday.com). But remember, it’s important to do your homework before submitting a pitch:

Even with more than seven decades behind its title, this is not your nana’s Woman’s Day. It’s not even the Woman’s Day from five years ago. Freelancers interested in writing for the mag would do themselves a world of favors by getting acquainted with its post-redesign iteration. “A writer who wants to pitch us really needs to have read the past year of issues to know what we’ve covered. That requires a bit of research and knowledge,” says [executive editor Annemarie Conte], who encourages aspiring contributors to do a little legwork. “We’re in 90 percent of libraries in the country. You can find our back issues. There’s no excuse not to know the last 12 months of Woman’s Day.”

To hear more about how to get published in this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Woman’s Day.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Details is Looking for Writers With a Knack for Witty Cultural Commentary

DetailsDetails magazine is not your average frat-boy pub. You won’t find foldouts of half-naked ladies or advice on how to throw the best kegger. Instead, you’ll find the latest style trends, celebrity interviews and sections on culture, body, tech, travel and more.

So how can a freelancer get his foot in the door at this sophisticated pub? Well, lucky for you, the mag has recently broadened its FOB and is now open to more first-person narratives:

The interests and tastes of the typical Details reader (a “young, successful, urban-dwelling man”) are central to the magazine’s editorial mission, and though Details has been primarily service-oriented in the past, editors have recently begun adding more voice to the magazine through the addition of cultural essays through all sections of the front-of-book. These totally pitchable first-person pieces are rooted in cultural commentary, says [Candice Rainey, deputy editor], but are still “viewed through the lens of Details.”

To hear more about to get published in this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Details.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Freelancers, Showcase Your Investigative Skills at Mother Jones

Mother JonesMother Jones, which launched in 1976, has always been a fearless pub, focused on holding those in power accountable for their actions. The mag has evolved over the years, and now focuses on a variety of topics, including politics, the environment and business accountability.

So how can a freelancer break in to this established, revered mag? Well, it helps to form relationships with the editors and to pitch fully formed stories, instead of just ideas:

Approximately one-third of the magazine is written by freelancers, many of whom have an ongoing relationship with the magazine. “We have some freelancers that we work with pretty regularly, but we also accept pitches for people who haven’t worked with us before,” said senior editor Nick Baumann. While no sections are off limits to freelancers, the feature well publishes the most freelance work. While many mags encourage freelancers to target pitches to a specific section of the book, “the best way to pitch MoJo is to have a story, and we’ll decide on our end what section we think it’s most appropriate for,” said Baumann.

To learn more about how to get published at this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Mother Jones.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Showcase Your Writing Skills at This Freelancer-Friendly Digital Mag

TheMagazineThe Magazine, the iOS-native pub, is looking for writers. The mag, which is 100 percent freelance written, focuses on an array of “stuff that people with [a geeky mind] find interesting,” said executive editor Glenn Fleishman.

According to Fleishman, the content of the pub skirts somewhere between Wired and The New Yorker, and the editors make an effort to be nice to freelancers:

Though the freelance life is filled with perks (flexible hours, being your own boss, etc.), it’s a career that’s tougher than it looks. Late payments (or lack of payments!), chasing down editors, crafting pitches only to never hear back from publications — these are routine travails that freelancers must deal with. Which is why when Mediabistro spoke to the editors of The Magazine, we were shocked for a few reasons: 1) The editors pride themselves on responding to each and every pitch; 2) If they like your idea but your pitch is not up to scratch, they will work with you on getting the pitch just right; and 3) They will put in a lot of time and effort to help you deliver the best piece possible.

To hear more about how to get published in The Magazine, read: How To Pitch: The Magazine.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 a Word at Sports Illustrated For Kids

SIKidsSports Illustrated For Kids is all about the joy of being a sports fan. The pub’s target demographic are boys aged 7-14, with a love of sports and a will to read.

While a majority of the content is written by in-house staffers, editors are always willing to hear new ideas from freelancers. Local stories are in demand, as are articles focusing on a niche industry. There are a few key sections of the pub which are particularly freelance friendly:

The best place for freelancers to pitch is the feature well. “We’re looking for great ideas, interesting takes that would manifest as packages or features or profiles,” says managing editor Bob Der. Features run about 1,000 words, and packages with multiple components (say, a series of features with sidebars) can run from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Packages could be thematic, such as “athletes who give back” or “environmental conservation as it relates to sports.”

For editors’ contact info and more pitching tips, read: How To Pitch: Sports Illustrated For Kids.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Writers, Filmmakers Welcome to Pitch The Grio

Editors at The Grio are always on the lookout for new writers. The site, aimed toward the black community, has about half of its content generated by freelancers. The NBC-owned website averages 2 million page views per month and distinguishes itself with video content and a lot of original reporting. Because the site relies so much on video content, editors also welcome pitches from aspiring filmmakers and producers for story-driven, narrative, documentary-style videos.

The Grio has only been around for a couple of years, but editors have already established strong relationships with freelancers who they turn to time and time again. That’s good news for writers looking to break in, because editors are always on the lookout for fresh talent to add to their stable. “Once a writer has been used on a regular basis, we will definitely farm stories out to them based on their specific style and previous pieces they’ve pitched,” explained managing editor Joy-Ann Reid.

For more info, read How To Pitch: The Grio. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Writers, Filmmakers Welcome to Pitch The Grio

Editors at The Grio are always on the lookout for new writers. The site, aimed toward the black community, has about half of its content generated by freelancers. The NBC-owned website averages 2 million page views per month and distinguishes itself with video content and a lot of original reporting. Because the site relies so much on video content, editors also welcome pitches from aspiring filmmakers and producers for story-driven, narrative, documentary-style videos.

The Grio has only been around for a couple of years, but editors have already established strong relationships with freelancers who they turn to time and time again. That’s good news for writers looking to break in, because editors are always on the lookout for fresh talent to add to their stable. “Once a writer has been used on a regular basis, we will definitely farm stories out to them based on their specific style and previous pieces they’ve pitched,” explained managing editor Joy-Ann Reid.

For more info, read How To Pitch: The Grio. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

The Fiscal Times: ‘We are always looking for new writers’

The Fiscal Times launched in March 2010 and quickly established itself among the ranks of pubs that cover politics, policy, economics and business. With a global readership similar to that of The Economist, Financial Times and Businessweek, landing a byline at the site means your words will reach everyone from Washington policymakers and corporate execs to college students and retirees.

TFT was named “Best New Site of 2011″ by minOnline, and its contributors include former staffers from The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. Freelancers, however, should not be daunted: “We’re always looking for new writers,” said senior editor Blaire Briody. Editors are on the lookout for stories that add value: “We are very interested in profiles of controversial political figures and business leaders, as well as counterintuitive pieces and data-driven analyses of government reports,” said Briody.

For more info, read How To Pitch: The Fiscal Times. [subscription required]

90 Percent of AskMen.com is Freelance-Written

AskMen.com, which focuses on giving guys actionable advice on career, health, dating and more, is in the market for freelancers with expertise. So, if you can show off personal finance savvy or dieting know-how to the editors, you could be landing assignments in no time.

“Our typical user is a guy in his late 20s, who is well out of college and may be getting his footing in his career, but is very much in an evolution phase in his life,” said editor-in-chief James Bassil. “He’s open to improvement, honest with himself about what he wants to do and is open to change. In presenting content, we want to egg readers on and motivate them to get through those changes, but also give them the tools to do so by providing a tangible, concrete thing that he needs to do right there. Takeaway value is huge. We want to give readers something they can put into use right away.”

Got a great idea for the site? Find more pitching guidelines and editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: AskMen.com. [subscription required]