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Posts Tagged ‘Farran Smith Nehme’

David Denby Looks Back at the Future of Movies

At age 69, New Yorker film critic David Denby owns at least two marks of modern media distinction. He is not on Twitter, and he still gets to mete out erudite, long-form print media movie critiques. A collection of his magazine essays spanning 1999 to 2011 make up his latest book Do the Movies Have a Future?, out next week from Simon & Schuster.

At the New Yorker, Denby famously alternates on the cinematic beat with Cambridge, UK based professor Anthony Lane. Part Six of the book is also about “Two Critics” – iconic predecessors James Agee and Pauline Kael. In the piece about Kael (an amalgamation of 2001 and 2003 articles), Denby recalls how she delivered a death blow in the early 1970s via telephone, informing him that he was simply not cut out to be a film critic.

“I was a graduate student in California going nowhere fast,” Denby tells FishbowlLA via telephone. “And if Pauline Kael hadn’t taken an interest in me – and she took an interest in many, many people, particularly young people – I probably would have become a professor of film, which is of course not bad. But this has been a lot more fun.”

“When she said, ‘This is not really for you,’ of course it was a blow and I was very upset,” he continues. “But she wound up hurting my feelings and not my career. In fact, in some ways it was the best thing that ever happened to me. Because if I had stayed within that circle, I don’t think I would have ever grown up. She was so powerful that you wanted her approval. Internally, you conformed to her opinions… It was sort of like, ‘What would Pauline think?’ And I think that’s a bad habit for anyone to get into, particularly a critic. So in a way, by being kicked out, I was forced to be my own man.”

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Former Newsweek Exec To Launch Three Online Magazines

Former Newsweek president Mark Edmiston is launching three online magazines of sorts later this year under his Nomad Editions brand: Real Eats, which will cover food; Wide Screen, which takes a look at all things film-related; and Wave Lines, a surfing mag .

Business Insider provides a look at the team Edmiston has assembled for these upcoming projects:

John Benditt will serve as editor in chief of all three title, drawing on his career as a magazine editor for multiple science and technology publications, including Scientific American.

Sean Elder has been named executive editor, as well as editor of Real Eats. He previously worked as an editor at magazines like Parenting, California Magazine, Elle and Premiere and was formerly the  executive producer of Totalny.com and editor in chief of New York Citysearch.com. He has been a staff writer at Salon, Details and The Wall Street Journal‘s online edition.

Laurie Kratochvil will serve as director of photography. She began her career in photography at The Los Angeles Times and later worked for the likes of Rolling Stone and InStyle.

Susan Murcko will be deputy editor, drawing on her experience at Rolling Stone, Details, Wired, and Condé Nast Portfolio.

Real Eats’ contributors include Serena Bass, Elisabeth Garber-Paul, Alice Gordon, Melinda Joe, Nanette Maxim, Justin Nobel, Susie Quick and Michelle Wildgen.

Contributors to Wave Lines include Jon Cohen (the publication’s editor),  Art Brewer, Steve Hawk, Lewis Samuels, Paul Shapiro and Matt Warshaw.

Wide Screen’s contributors are Glenn Kenny (its editor), Simon Abrams, Farran Smith Nehme, Vadim Rizov and Karl Rozemeyer.