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Posts Tagged ‘freelance’

Details.com is on the Lookout for Innovative Writers With Style

details-screenshotDetails.com isn’t your traditional “macho” men’s website with an endless stream of sports, women and beer. No, this digital space is all about modern men’s luxury. So, dudes, if you’re embarrassed about discussing your grooming habits, this site isn’t for you.

The magazine’s digital counterpart (which averages about 1 million uniques a month) is on the hunt for freelancers to enhance its ever-expanding content. So what kind of writing are the editors looking for? Well, it depends on what you bring to the table:

The vast majority of the content on Details.com is presented through 500-word blog posts or slideshows that include a hed, dek, intro and captions. That may seem limiting, but considering the vast coverage of the site ensures that there are plenty of opportunities for freelance bylines. In “Style” and “Advice,” editors are looking for fashion news, not generic how-tos or service pieces. “They tend to be too remedial, and it’s not something that we’re trying to aggregate right now,” says [online director James Cury]. “So you’d want to spot a trend, or anticipate a trend. That would be ideal for us.”

To hear more about what Details.com is looking for, as well as editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Details.com.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Showcase Your Creativity at This Historic Mag

SaturdayEveningPostSeeing as The Saturday Evening Post has been around for almost 300 years, one would assume the pub would become stale and archaic at some point. But no, this storied mag has evolved with time, and currently reports on the most important happenings in society, art, travel and culture.

The pub is 80 percent freelance written. So what kind of writing are the editors looking for? One word springs to mind: creativity.

[Steve Slon, editor-in-chief] is looking for intriguing features. Got an in with a hard-to-reach celebrity? Pitch a profile and watch your odds of landing a byline increase dramatically. Most important, though, is a spark of creativity that goes beyond basic (boring) journalism. “A good reporter is a good reporter, and certainly we need stories like that,” Slon said. “But I’m looking for someone who can bring something — a little depth, a little perception, a little more to the table than simply calling the top three experts in the field and reporting back.”

To hear more tips, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: The Saturday Evening Post.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Achieve Financial Security as a Freelancer

SixfigureFreelancerFreelance writing isn’t an obvious route to monetary success. Many people choose to freelance because they want to pursue their passion, and making boatloads of money isn’t really the goal. But what if you could do what you love — and make a killing at the same time?

Our latest Mediabistro feature discusses various tips and tricks on how to score major moolah on your next assignment. Seeking out new markets is a great way to expand your repertoire and make new connections:

“Writers think that if they want to make a lot of money they have to pitch the biggest magazines because they pay the most,” said [Linda Formichelli, author and co-founder of the Renegade Writer blog]. But, she warns, those are so difficult to break into that “not many people make a living writing only for the consumer magazines.” As a veteran freelancer, she has shifted her writing focus to include trade (business-to-business) and custom publications (like the ones you get from your credit card or insurance company). It’s a strategy she suggests for other writers who want to earn more cash, too.

To hear more tips on how to earn a major paycheck as freelancer, read: How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Market Yourself as a Freelance Travel Writer

Travel writing careerTravel writing is something many freelancers fantasize about. Getting paid to travel the world and eat amazing food — where do I sign up?

Although it sounds exciting in theory, the reality of life as a travel writer is just as stressful and unglamorous as any other freelance career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one writer discusses the lessons she’s learned after 10 years in the business. One of the most important ones? Market yourself to death:

Years ago I joined Mediabistro’s Freelance Marketplace, and it paid dividends. Soon after I joined, the editor of an in-flight magazine contacted me via my profile, and I wrote a bi-monthly column for him for four years. I continue to be a member and update my clips regularly. You never know when an editor will be looking for a writer just like you! I also read Mediabistro’s How To Pitch articles. Not only do I look at the travel-specific magazines, but also the lifestyle titles to find out how travel pieces I have in mind might fit into their books. At the end of the day, as with all freelance writing, it’s about being innovative and finding unique perspectives on topics that have already been covered, and making the pitch.

To hear more tips on how to create a lasting travel writing career, read: Embarking On My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 a Word at Sports Illustrated For Kids

SIKidsSports Illustrated For Kids is all about the joy of being a sports fan. The pub’s target demographic are boys aged 7-14, with a love of sports and a will to read.

While a majority of the content is written by in-house staffers, editors are always willing to hear new ideas from freelancers. Local stories are in demand, as are articles focusing on a niche industry. There are a few key sections of the pub which are particularly freelance friendly:

The best place for freelancers to pitch is the feature well. “We’re looking for great ideas, interesting takes that would manifest as packages or features or profiles,” says managing editor Bob Der. Features run about 1,000 words, and packages with multiple components (say, a series of features with sidebars) can run from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Packages could be thematic, such as “athletes who give back” or “environmental conservation as it relates to sports.”

For editors’ contact info and more pitching tips, read: How To Pitch: Sports Illustrated For Kids.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 A Word At Cosmopolitan for Latinas

CosmopolitanLatinasCosmopolitan for Latinas is a relatively new mag, but it has the advantage of a built-in audience that is already familiar with the Cosmopolitan brand. The twist is that this glossy is dedicated to all things Latina.

As managing editor Jessica Rodriguez says: “[We want] to be able to talk to [Latinas] about fashion and beauty and all of the issues and particular nuances about their bi-cultural lives.” The pub is in need of writers for their lifestyle, health and entertaining features, among others:

Editors at the mag assign out to freelancers, but there are a few sections of the book that are particularly friendly to pitches, too. “Real Talk,” a lifestyle section that weighs in on different issues, is one of them. Anything with a unique angle will catch the editors’ eyes here, and a good example is a piece called “I Won’t Date a Latin Guy.”

To learn more about how to get published in this mag, including the editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Cosmopolitan for Latinas.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How To Negotiate Pay Increases as a Freelancer

LifeAsAFreelancer

Becoming a freelancer full time can be an overwhelming undertaking. The reliability of your old job is long gone, replaced with a constant need to hustle for work.

And that’s not even going into the money issue. Freelancers often deal with a fluctuating financial situation. Some months you be may have more clients than you know what to do with, other times — not so much.

That’s why it’s so important to know what your work is worth:

I’ve found editors rarely pay much in increases; they have a budget for stories and that’s that. However, if you’re a steady contributor, you may be able to finagle an extra $50 or so. If the work isn’t too demanding, it might be worth your while to keep this client. Or perhaps you can negotiate other benefits. For example, instead of all rights to the work, your client takes only one-time rights, so you can easily sell the work (and make money) elsewhere.

To get more advice on freelancing, read: Pros and Cons of Life as a Freelancer.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

News-Driven Stories Land $1.50 A Word At Outside

Outside

Outside is looking for writers with a sense of adventure. The monthly mag features articles on pop culture, news, science, tech, fitness and more. Although one might assume the audience is primarily snowboarding dudes from Aspen, Colo., that’s not entirely the case.

Yes, the mag’s audience is predominately male, but many readers are city dwellers longing for an escape. The pub is 70 percent freelance written, and their newly redesigned website is on the hunt for writers keen on fast-breaking news.

The mag’s senior editor Abe Streep tells what kind of stories make it in the mag:

“A pitch on the best hikes in the National Parks probably won’t get you far,” said Streep. But travel news that leads to actionable service — say, a story on how the Grand Canyon’s new permitting system for rafters affects readers — is very welcome. News that leads to service is the ideal: new lodges, new technology, new training tools. The magazine is focusing more and more on its core mission: inspiring adventure. “We’re still looking for pop-culture stories,” said Streep, “but only those that are a natural fit for Outside.”

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Outside.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

What to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed

KilledStory

Let’s say you landed a pitch (hooray!) and after all the effort you put into the research, reporting and writing — the piece gets rejected. What’s your next move?

It can be hard to pick yourself up after your story gets killed. It’s easy to take it personally — but there are countless reasons why your story didn’t make it to publication, and it may have nothing to do with your writing. It could be a time issue, internal changes at the magazine or it could be a new editor who just doesn’t care for your topic.

The latest Mediabistro feature looks at what you should do when your hard work doesn’t make it into the book. Here’s an excerpt:

Be prepared to take responsibility for any shortcomings or misunderstandings. Most importantly, be able to learn from the situation. Not every editor is willing to be your mentor, but some are willing to give you feedback as to why something won’t or didn’t work. And whatever you do, don’t be overly apologetic. You’ll only appear desperate and needy to the editor, which doesn’t bode well if you hope to work with him or her again. I learned the hard way that editors simply don’t have patience for it. Instead, thank them for the opportunity and assure that you’ll apply the lessons from the experience to future assignments.

For more advice on how to move forward, read: 6 Things to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Monetize Your Blog

Everyone has a blog nowadays, but not everyone manages to make money from it. If you’ve managed to strike upon a large readership for your blog, thanks to breaking news or a great idea, your road to monetizing is far from over. Just because the masses come to you for info or entertainment does not mean advertisers will do the same, or that a book deal is in the bag. In the latest Mediabistro feature, Blair Koenig shares her experience from building a successful blog STFU, Parents, which gets 1.5 to 2 million page views a month:

When you’re building your own personal blog, it’s up to you to figure out how to make money — whether it’s from ad networks, independent advertisers, book deals, stores or through other media outlets. Koenig jokes, “I know there’s a lot out there that makes it sound like if you’re a popular blogger someone’s going to just ring your doorbell and be like, ‘Hey, I want to make a movie [based on your blog]!’ But it’s really, really hard and usually a lot of that stuff is created from the blogger [rather] than the other way around.”

Koenig uses three different ad networks and a couple of independent advertisers to earn money on her blog. She landed a book deal after completing the grueling process of writing a 60-page book proposal. She has plans to build a store within her website featuring STFU, Parents-themed merchandise as well. But money doesn’t suddenly start flowing in when your blog becomes popular, according to Koenig. She’s appeared on Good Morning America and various news outlets to talk about her blog, and although these appearances spike traffic to her site, she’s not getting paid outright for any publicity.

For more tips and advice on blogging, read What You Need to Know About Writing for Blogs.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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