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Posts Tagged ‘freelance writing’

Southwest: The Magazine to Debut a Personal Essay Section in January

Southwest-The-Magazine-ArtiThe changes coming to Southwest: The Magazine won’t stop with its recent renaming. This January, Southwest, née Spirit magazine, plans to debut a new section featuring 1,500-word personal essays.

The subject matter for this section is open-ended, and more importantly, it will be open to pitches. Since the feature well is currently the only section open to receiving freelance pitches, the essay section will double the opportunities available to freelancers.

This department is a great chance to let your creative imagination run wild! [associate editor JK] Nickell is interested in stories that range “from parenthood to a childhood memory to something random that happened last week that we can bring some humor and emotion to.”

For more, including the type of pitch editors want to see, read: How To Pitch: Southwest: The Magazine

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Profile Prominent Chicagoans for Michigan Avenue

Michigan-Ave-ArticleMichigan Avenue is a signifier for Chicago natives and tourists alike. As the street that houses the Art Institute of Chicago, Millennium Park and the upscale shopping district known as the Magnificent Mile, it is a location that connotes culture and luxury. So, too, does the eponymous magazine, part of Niche Media’s portfolio of high-end regional glossies.

Since the magazine’s editor-in-chief, J.P. Anderson, relies on a cadre of regular freelancers for much of the magazine’s content, those who’ve never pitched the magazine really need to stand out. If you have the skills to snag an interview with and write a profile on one of Chicago’s notables, that’s what you’ll want to be pitching.

One section to focus on is “Talent Patrol,” a profile of an up-and-comer in any occupational field that ranges from 450 to 500 words. Anderson is also looking for fresh content for “A View from the Top,” a longer profile piece (800 to 900 words) about a Chicagoan who is an absolute pinnacle of his or her industry. For this piece, you’ll need to interview a CEO or company founder who has risen to the top and has lessons to share with others about how they got to where they are, and what about Chicago inspires them. “Native” is a section that runs 800 to 1,000 words and focuses on prominent Chicagoans who share some buzz-worthy news about their neighborhood or describe places in the city that have the most meaning for them.

For more, including the top three items editors want your pitch to cover, read: How To Pitch: Michigan Avenue

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Help AskMen.com’s Audience Through its Quarter-Life Crisis

AskMen-articleThe male 20-somethings that visit AskMen.com are trying to figure out their lives, and the site is there to help them answer a lot of questions on their journey.

“We’ve got a fairly even split between single and married guys, but most of them are in some sort of transitional state,” said [publisher and editor-in-chief James] Bassil, referring to changes in careers or relationships, among others. The common factor is these men tend to be engaged with shaping and re-shaping their lives. They’re often looking for new perspectives and are open to a wide range of topics.

For freelancers, whom the magazine relies on for a whopping 80 percent of content, this means an open laboratory of topics and ideas to experiment with. The 15-year-old site is particularly eager for stories that deliver career and personal finance advice, cover the latest technologies and developments in health or identify emerging trends and brands in fashion. It’s not a bad idea to think #slatepitch when emailing the site, as Bassil appreciates counterintuitive takes that bring something new to readers.

For more, including ways to make your pitch stand out, read: How To Pitch: AskMen.com

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Outside Seeks Inspiring Adventure Stories With a Strong News Hook

Outside-Oct-2014-coverOutside, which was founded in 1977, has gone through plenty of reinventions. These days, the mag’s audience is 70 percent male and the pub targets not only those whose days typically involve black-diamond runs, but the city office worker as well, holed up in his cubicle as he saves vacation days for an epic outdoor adventure.

Best bets for Outside newbies are “Dispatches,” from the FOB and “Bodywork,” the magazine’s fitness section, which accepts news items as short as 100 words and reports as long as 1200. Whether you’re pitching stories on exploration, sports, fitness or the environment, make sure it’s timely:

Don’t pitch travel roundups without a news peg. “A pitch on the best hikes in the National Parks probably won’t get you far,” said [senior editor Abe Streep]. But travel news that leads to actionable service — say, a story on how the Grand Canyon’s new permitting system for rafters affects readers — is very welcome. News that leads to service is the ideal: new lodges, new technology, new training tools.

For more advice, including what to pitch to the website, read: How to Pitch: Outside

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Showcase Your Creativity at This Historic Mag

SaturdayEveningPostSeeing as The Saturday Evening Post has been around for almost 300 years, one would assume the pub would become stale and archaic at some point. But no, this storied mag has evolved with time, and currently reports on the most important happenings in society, art, travel and culture.

The pub is 80 percent freelance written. So what kind of writing are the editors looking for? One word springs to mind: creativity.

[Steve Slon, editor-in-chief] is looking for intriguing features. Got an in with a hard-to-reach celebrity? Pitch a profile and watch your odds of landing a byline increase dramatically. Most important, though, is a spark of creativity that goes beyond basic (boring) journalism. “A good reporter is a good reporter, and certainly we need stories like that,” Slon said. “But I’m looking for someone who can bring something — a little depth, a little perception, a little more to the table than simply calling the top three experts in the field and reporting back.”

To hear more tips, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: The Saturday Evening Post.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn up to $2 a Word at the Newly Revamped Woman’s Day

womans-day-january-2014Woman’s Day magazine has been around for 75 years, so naturally there have been some changes to the format, tone and style of the pub. But since its 2012 redesign, editors say the mag is more focused than ever on adding value to their readers’ lives — whether it be money-saving tips, recipes or health news.

The pub is ready for fresh new writers, and there are plenty of opportunities for freelancers (including contributing to Womansday.com). But remember, it’s important to do your homework before submitting a pitch:

Even with more than seven decades behind its title, this is not your nana’s Woman’s Day. It’s not even the Woman’s Day from five years ago. Freelancers interested in writing for the mag would do themselves a world of favors by getting acquainted with its post-redesign iteration. “A writer who wants to pitch us really needs to have read the past year of issues to know what we’ve covered. That requires a bit of research and knowledge,” says [executive editor Annemarie Conte], who encourages aspiring contributors to do a little legwork. “We’re in 90 percent of libraries in the country. You can find our back issues. There’s no excuse not to know the last 12 months of Woman’s Day.”

To hear more about how to get published in this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Woman’s Day.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Showcase Your Writing Skills at This Freelancer-Friendly Digital Mag

TheMagazineThe Magazine, the iOS-native pub, is looking for writers. The mag, which is 100 percent freelance written, focuses on an array of “stuff that people with [a geeky mind] find interesting,” said executive editor Glenn Fleishman.

According to Fleishman, the content of the pub skirts somewhere between Wired and The New Yorker, and the editors make an effort to be nice to freelancers:

Though the freelance life is filled with perks (flexible hours, being your own boss, etc.), it’s a career that’s tougher than it looks. Late payments (or lack of payments!), chasing down editors, crafting pitches only to never hear back from publications — these are routine travails that freelancers must deal with. Which is why when Mediabistro spoke to the editors of The Magazine, we were shocked for a few reasons: 1) The editors pride themselves on responding to each and every pitch; 2) If they like your idea but your pitch is not up to scratch, they will work with you on getting the pitch just right; and 3) They will put in a lot of time and effort to help you deliver the best piece possible.

To hear more about how to get published in The Magazine, read: How To Pitch: The Magazine.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 a Word at Sports Illustrated For Kids

SIKidsSports Illustrated For Kids is all about the joy of being a sports fan. The pub’s target demographic are boys aged 7-14, with a love of sports and a will to read.

While a majority of the content is written by in-house staffers, editors are always willing to hear new ideas from freelancers. Local stories are in demand, as are articles focusing on a niche industry. There are a few key sections of the pub which are particularly freelance friendly:

The best place for freelancers to pitch is the feature well. “We’re looking for great ideas, interesting takes that would manifest as packages or features or profiles,” says managing editor Bob Der. Features run about 1,000 words, and packages with multiple components (say, a series of features with sidebars) can run from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Packages could be thematic, such as “athletes who give back” or “environmental conservation as it relates to sports.”

For editors’ contact info and more pitching tips, read: How To Pitch: Sports Illustrated For Kids.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Find Your Niche At This Science-Driven Beauty Site

YouBeautyYouBeauty.com is not your average beauty website. Yes, you’ll hear about the latest mascara, but you’ll also read about scientific studies and take quizzes straight from universities and research institutions.

Writers can land up to $1 a word here, provided they have strong writing and reporting chops. So how can a freelancer get a foot in the door? Writers should start by researching the site and then zeroing in on a niche:

With research and science at the core of YouBeauty’s content, high-quality reporting and writing is paramount. As such, editors generally work with writers who have previous experience covering topics on one of the site’s existing channels. “We really want people who specialize in their different segments because we get in depth,” said editor-in-chief Laura Kenney. “So it helps for someone to come in who has a [specialty] that they’re very confident in writing about and then pitching us in-depth stories for that vertical.”

To hear more advice on how to get published, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: YouBeauty.com.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Enhance Your Writing Career By Becoming An Expert

specializingBecoming a freelancer after working a traditional 9-to-5 job can be daunting. One way to make your life easier (and hopefully score more job opportunities) is to narrow your writing down to a specific topic.

Although you may be tempted to write about any random subject that pops in your mind (hey, you’ve got bills to pay), the experts advise against this tactic. Instead, find your specialty, and try to branch out within that:

Whether you’re a new freelancer or an established one, you may already gravitate toward a specific subject or two. Focus on a topic you’re truly interested in, and the writing will come naturally. Don’t worry about markets just yet. There are paying markets for every niche, and you’ll land those gigs if your work is strong. Reaching out across social media can boost your presence and reliability as an expert in a specific field.

To get more tips on how to hone your specialty to grow your career, read: Growing Your Writing Career By Becoming A Specialist

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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