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Posts Tagged ‘Frontline’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Sawyer Steps Down | Broadcasters Beat Aereo

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Diane Sawyer Leaving ABC World News, David Muir Takes Over as Anchor And Managing Editor (TVNewser)
ABC’s Diane Sawyer is stepping down from anchoring World News and will focus on primetime specials, big interviews, and enterprise reporting for the network. David Muir, who has been sole anchor of the World News weekend editions since 2011, will take over as anchor and managing editor of the flagship broadcast on Sept. 2. FishbowlDC In his new role, Muir will no longer anchor World News on Saturdays and Sundays but will remain co-anchor of 20/20 with Elizabeth Vargas. In addition to the new roles for Sawyer and Muir, George Stephanopoulos, anchor of Good Morning America and This Week, has been promoted to chief anchor of ABC News. TVNewser Sawyer has been anchor since 2009. She came in following the retirement of Charles Gibson who, in 2006, succeeded the anchor team of Bob Woodruff and Elizabeth Vargas. Capital New York Late last year there were reports that Sawyer did not want Stephanopoulos to replace her as World News anchor, even though he was believed to have a clause in his contract assuring him the role should she step down. Stephanopoulos signed a new deal with ABC News earlier this year. Muir has long been rumored to be the favorite inside ABC to follow Sawyer. Deadline Hollywood World News won the May sweep in adults 25-54, the evening broadcast’s first sweeps victory in more than six years. Season to date, World News is up versus the same point last year in both total viewers and adults 25-54, delivering its most-watched season in five years and best news demo number in three years.

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Digital Media Guru Douglas Rushkoff Joins CUNY Faculty

RushkoffBeginning this fall at CUNY’s Queens College, students can work their way towards an MA in Media Studies. Set to mold the curriculum is an expert responsible for terms such as “viral media” and “social currency.”

From today’s announcement:

This marks the first full-time academic role for Douglas Rushkoff, a prolific media theorist, award-winning author and documentarian considered one of the most influential thinkers of the digital age. Starting this August, he will help lead the development of a new Master of Arts in Media Studies program that will address the technological and market forces that dominate our daily lives.

Rushkoff, who holds a PhD in New Media and Digital Culture, is the author of over a dozen best-selling books, the winner of the first Neil Postman Award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity and creator of four award-winning PBS Frontline documentaries on the cultural and societal impact of media and the media industry.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN/PBS Doc Fallout | Times Co. CEO Dishes | WaPo‘s MLK Snub


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Was ESPN Sloppy, Naïve or Compromised? (ESPN / Ombudsman)
So what’s more damaging to a corporate image: to be considered sloppy, naïve or compromised? Or all three? You get to pick in the wake of ESPN’s announcement that it was removing its brand from an upcoming two-part documentary by PBS’ Frontline that “reveals the hidden story of the NFL and brain injuries” (or so it claims in a controversial trailer). The ESPN action drew immediate media and mailbag accusations that the NFL had pressured the network into severing ties to the PBS films. I thought the best and briefest characterization came from Ombuddy Philip Berenbroick of Arlington, Va., who saw ESPN’s decision as an example of “the dueling journalism and profit motives [via protecting valued partners] at the network.” It’s hard to argue with that depiction. NYT ESPN’s divorce with PBS came a week after the NFL voiced its displeasure with the documentary at a lunch between league and ESPN executives, according to two people with direct knowledge of the situation. The meeting took place at Patroon, near the league’s Midtown Manhattan headquarters, according to the two people, who requested anonymity because they were prohibited by their superiors from discussing the matter publicly. It was a table for four: Roger Goodell, commissioner of the NFL; Steve Bornstein, president of the NFL Network; John Skipper, ESPN’s president; and John Wildhack, ESPN’s executive vice president for production. Deadline Hollywood The League Of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis trailer was screened at an Aug. 6 media panel and unveiled without Skipper’s or ESPN’s approval. Skipper complained the video was “sensational” and made him “quite unhappy.” He didn’t like the tagline, “Get ready to change the way you see the game,” or the trailer’s final quote from a neuropathologist on the extent of brain injuries in the NFL, “I’m really wondering if every single football player doesn’t have this.” Media watchers say pressure from the NFL led to ESPN’s sudden withdrawal and now Skipper admits he was embarrassed by the Frontline documentary. HuffPost In the wake of a report that ESPN bowed out of a joint investigative project with PBS on NFL player concussions, the union representing players said it was a “disappointing day for journalism” if the sports network caved on the series out of business concerns. “I think any time that business interests get in the way of telling an important story like the one Frontline was working on, I think that that’s a sad day, regardless of why or who or what the circumstances were,” George Atallah, spokesman for the NFL Players Association, told HuffPost. CJR / Full-Court Press Whatever the case, it looks bad for both parties. The NFL is being sued over its decades of “Don’t worry, it’s just a bruise” approach to medicine, a personal-injury lawsuit that has expanded to some 4,500 plaintiffs. Reports of the kind broadcast by ESPN and PBS not only damage the league’s brand equity, but have the potential to inflict further direct damages in existing and potential lawsuits. That’s not the sort of benefits promised by a broadcast partner when it agrees to pay more than a billion dollars in rights fees to the NFL.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN Dumps Frontline | Manning Puzzles Journos | Kochs Walk From LA Times


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ESPN Pulls Out of Frontline Concussion Investigation (Deadspin)
For a while now, ESPN’s big alibi, the thing Bristol would trot out any time someone questioned the company’s journalistic bona fides, was its joint investigation into NFL head injuries with PBS’ Frontline. Now that’s done with. ESPN said in a statement: “Because ESPN is neither producing nor exercising editorial control over the Frontline documentaries, there will be no co-branding involving ESPN on the documentaries or their marketing materials. The use of ESPN’s marks could incorrectly imply that we have editorial control. As we have in the past, we will continue to cover the concussion story through our own reporting.” PBS / Frontline “…[We] regret ESPN’s decision to end a collaboration that has spanned the last 15 months and is based on the work of ESPN reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru, as well as Frontline’s own original journalism. Over that time, we’ve enjoyed a productive partnership with ESPN’s investigative program, Outside the Lines, jointly publishing and co-branding several ground-breaking articles on our respective websites and on their broadcast. We’ve been in sync on the goals of our reporting: to present the deepest accounting so far of the league’s handling of questions around the long-term impact of concussions. This editorial partnership was similar to our many other collaborations with news organizations over the years.” TVNewser The partnership resulted in a number of long-form articles about the NFL’s response to concussions, as well as a number of reports on Outside the Lines, ESPN’s acclaimed newsmagazine. NYT The NFL was not supportive of the documentary. Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the league, said it declined to make commissioner Roger Goodell and other executives available for it. The league allowed the doctors who advise it on concussions to decide themselves if they wanted to take part. The Atlantic Wire ESPN has previously faced criticism over its coverage of the impact of concussions and head injuries on NFL players. Because the network makes a lot of money from broadcasting NFL games, there is concern of an acute conflict of interest going on between the editorial and business sides of the Connecticut-based company.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: News Emmy Nominations | GOOD Cuts 7 | Do Journos Contribute?


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CBS, PBS Lead Nominations for News And Documentary Emmys (TheWrap)
CBS led the way with 46 nominations, followed closely by PBS with 45, as the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences announced the nominees for the 34th Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards on Thursday. TVNewser 60 Minutes is the most-nominated program, with 24 nominations, followed by Frontline with 18. CBS Evening News secured 10 noms, with Nightline leading ABC and Dateline leading NBC with five nominations each. CBS This Morning, in its first year nominated, secured seven nominations, while GMA and Today each secured one. TVSpy Eight local stations have been nominated for News and Documentary Emmys. WBZ, WMAQ and WNBC were nominated for Outstanding Regional News Story in the Spot News category, and KING, KNXV, WABC, WTTG and WXYZ in Detroit were nominated for Outstanding Regional News Story in the Investigative Reporting category. FishbowlDC CNN’s Jeff Zucker is out with another warm and fuzzy memo for employees. This time on account of the fact that the network has been nominated for eight News and Documentary Emmys. THR The Emmys will be handed out Oct. 1 in New York City.

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Newsweek to Hit Frontline of Campaign ’08

h_logo.gifThe latest television/magazine partnership has stellar PBS show Frontline teaming up with Newsweek to give viewers the “inside story” on the 2008 presidential campaign.

Frontline producers will work side by side with the magazine’s reporting team, its writers and editors, to produce “The Race 2008,” a Frontline/Newsweek special report that will take PBS viewers inside the Republican and Democratic campaigns for the White House.
Maybe we’ll finally discover whether Obama really does eat all that arugula! Or perhaps the burning question of how John McCain gets his porn will be solved. Either way, we’ll have to wait till the election is over to find out; the special isn’t set to air until Nov. 11, one week after the election

Breaking: Jim O’Shea Responds to the Frontline Piece

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This memo was sent by LAT editor, Jim O’Shea, to his newsroom kinfolk in response to last night’s damning Frontline piece about the future of newspapers:

Colleagues,

Unfortuately I am not in the newsroom today. I am in New York for the L.A. Times Book Prizes. I did want to address the Frontline piece involving The Los Angeles Times, though.

I found it to be simplistic and excessively negative about the future of the newspaper industry and the L.A. Times. The piece lacked balance and sophistication and relied on stereotypes.

I know there was also concern about quotes from Charles Bobrinskoy at Ariel Capital. Mr. Bobrinskoy knows as much about newspapers and the needs and news appetites of the readers of The Los Angeles Times as I know about astrophysics. Everyone should keep in mind that “analysts” of the stock market are the same ones who advised people to buy stocks such as Enron. I could fill the Grand Canyon with the misinformation that people such as Bobrinskoy have spread. So I think everyone should look at his comments in that context.

I have never heard anyone at Tribune Company advocate that The Los Angeles Times should become a paper without foreign or national bureaus. I doubt he represents anyone’s views but his own. I certainly don’t think he is right and I would never have agreed to be your editor if such a preposterous proposal were part of any deal.

The Los Angeles Times is a great newspaper with a great staff. We face challenges, and they won’t be easy to overcome. But we will do it. We will figure out solutions to these problems and lead the industry to a bright and better future. Thanks so much for all of your hard work.

Jim.