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Posts Tagged ‘Gordon Crovitz’

Wall Street Journal Publisher Jumps to Merged Paywall Firm

PianoMediaLogoFrom a media personnel perspective, the most intriguing aspect of Slovakian startup Piano Media’s acquisition of much larger U.S. paywall services firm Press+ is the individual they’ve snared to run the merged entity. Poynter’s Rick Edmonds spoke to Kelly Leach, formerly the publisher of the Wall Stret Journal‘s European edition, to ask why she decided to make this somewhat unorthodox career move:

“I really believe in the paid digital model, and I did when not very many others did…” she said. “It’s an area I’m passionate about. We have seen this wave working its way around the world and at the same time we are realizing that digital ads alone won’t carry the day.”

Leach worked with [Press+ co-founder Gordon] Crovitz in the early 2000s, when he was Wall Street Journal publisher, and the Journal was among the first to introduce digital subscriptions. (Closing the Dow-Jones loop, she was recruited for the job by [Piano Media communications director] David Brauchli’s brother, Marcus, a former editor of the Journal and later the Washington Post).

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New York Times Company Could Name CEO by September

The New York Times Company released its 2Q report this morning, and buried among the bad news — the company posted a loss again, down $88 million because of decreasing ad dollars — was a small note about that CEO search:

A person familiar with the company’s thinking, who could not discuss private meetings publicly, said the board had made significant progress on the chief executive search and could announce a successor as early as September.

So Times reporters have insiders at the Times dishing on the Times. Got it.

The Times has been looking for someone to fill the diamond-encrusted shoes of Janet Robinson since late last year, and so far, we’ve only heard two names pop up — Gordon Crovitz and Alan Spoon. Will either be the company’s new CEO? Hard to say, but we’ll keep you posted.

Two Names Emerge in Search for Next New York Times Company CEO

The search being conducted by Spencer Stuart for the next New York Times Company CEO has kicked up two names: Gordon Crovitz and Alan Spoon. The New York Post is reporting that those two have emerged as frontrunners to replace Janet Robinson, though nothing is confirmed.

The two are big names, but don’t carry the digital experience many think the Times needs. Crovitz was The Wall Street Journal’s Publisher until 2007, when News Corp. completed its acquisition of Dow Jones. Since then he has been working as an advisor to tech startups. Spoon was most notably the President and CEO of The Washington Post Company; he also had a stint as President of Newsweek.

Obviously the two leading the pack is just a rumor, so don’t get too crazed. Hopefully the Times recognizes the need for someone with more of a digital background and will do the right thing. Stay tuned.

Journalism Online Offers Alternative To Pay Wall

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With Newsweek NewsDay about to begin charging access to their online articles via a pay wall, we’re beginning to wonder if there is any other alternative for print publications to make money off the web. Obviously, ads aren’t cutting it, and if you aren’t charging readers access, then you’re giving your content away.

Journalism Online – a new media consulting agency formed by media gurus Steven Brill, Gordon Crovitz, and Leo Hindery, Jr – is offering what might be the best solution yet to this problem: In the next month or so, 10-15 publishers will roll out the media consulting site’s pay model, which involves a gradual, not abrupt, dip into the charging-for-content sector.

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Journalism Online Has Deals With 506 Papers & Mags|Some iPhone App Ideas For Mags|Nina Garcia’s New TV Role|Reader’s Digest May Miss Debt Payment|Too Many Media Gossip Sites? Never.

WebNewser: Journalism Online, the start-up founded by Steven Brill, Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindery Jr. aimed at helping media outlets monetize content on the Web, claims that it has made deals with 506 newspapers and magazines. Each publication will reveal its association with the company in separate announcements, the owners said.

minOnline: Some iPhone app ideas that magazines should totally steal.

Fashion Week Daily: Marie Claire fashion director Nina Garcia has a role in the new TV drama about models called “The Beautiful Life,” which also stars Mischa Barton and Elle Macpherson.

Folio: Uh oh. Sources tell Folio that Reader’s Digest might not be able to make an interest payment on its debt due next week.

True/Slant: This blog post by Marcelo Ballve claims there are too many media gossip Web sites. No comment.

Runner’s World Credits Web Site For Sub Increase|LA Weekly Writer Responds To Criticism|Ivanka To Wed Jared|Brill & Crovitz Discuss Journalism Online|Praise For Andrew Sullivan

WebNewser: Runner’s World‘s Web site drove an 89 percent increase magazine subscriptions during the first half of the year, compared to 2008. Overall, the magazine saw a 5 percent increase in subscriptions during the first six months of the year.

FishbowlLA: LA Weekly writer Daniel Heimpel responds to a blogger’s negative commentary of his medical marijuana article.

Daily Intel: New York Observer owner Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump are engaged and she sat down with New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog to discuss the relationship. They both sound like workaholics, but him even more than her. Says an enamored Trump: “Every night when he goes home, he works for about an hour and a half and return[s] e-mails he hadn’t had a chance to return before. He’s just very diligent…Even when we first started dating, I’d call him at 6 [a.m.] when I’m getting up, and he’d be awake; he’d definitely be awake when I was going to sleep. And all Sunday he’s in the office.” Mazel tov, you crazy kids.

AOL DailyFinance: Jeff Bercovici talks to Steve Brill and Gordon Crovitz about their Journalism Online project, which seeks to help newspapers and media companies charge money for their digital content.

The Week: High praise for Andrew Sullivan, blogger for The Atlantic‘s Daily Dish. “With the help of a couple of assistants, Sullivan produced a journalistic tour de force that was more comprehensive, informative, provocative, and addictively compelling than anything produced by news organizations with hundreds of professional journalists on staff and coteries of experts on speed dial,” says Francis Wilkinson. “His Iran coverage was the blogosphere’s moonshot, a feat of grit and daring heralding a new era in cyberspace. It was a preview of the future of journalism — and it worked. Or seemed to.”

Media Execs Take Paid Content Into Their Own Hands

pennies1.jpgA little less conversation a little more action! Perhaps that was part of the thinking behind Journalism Online, the new iTunes (ish) for media launch conceived by Steve Brill, Gordon Crovitz, and Leo Hindery.

The Times reports that the company “aims to supply publishers with ready-made tools to charge Internet fees…The company, which says it may have a product ready by the fall, says the advantages are that publishers would not have to develop their own systems and readers could use a single system for many different publications.”

The details are still being sorted, and no one has yet signed on, but the idea is that publishers will be able to choose how they want to make their content available, i.e. subscription, micro-payment, etc. And while the micropayment system has thus far been a great conversation topic, it’s not been lauded by media types as being all that practical. Still Journalism Online could provide a great testing ground for newspapers to explore what customers are willing to pay for (or not) when it comes to content.