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Posts Tagged ‘HollywoodLife’

HollywoodLife Welcomes New Managing Editor

CarolynDavisPicPeople magazine; MTV; US Weekly; HollywoodLife. That’s the career progression of Carolyn Davis (pictured) who, effective July 15, is the managing editor for Bonnie Fuller‘s celebrity news site.

To go along with this hire, HL also promoted senior reporter Emily Longeretta to news editor. From this week’s announcement:

“Carolyn’s in-depth knowledge and experience in the celebrity/entertainment and pop culture world will be a tremendous asset to HollywoodLife, as well as her infectious energy and enthusiasm for connecting with our audience of female Millennial readers,” said HollywoodLife president and editor-in-chief Fuller.

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HollywoodLife Aims Slingshot at New York Times, Vulture

ShutterstockPaulWalkerIt’s a  modest, unbylined attempt at Bonnie vs. media goliaths criticism. One that completely misses the mark.

HollywoodLife, four days later, is taking issue with a December 1 NYT article by Emma G. Fitzsimmons. The publication feels that no one should be chipping away, posthumously, at the Paul Walker film career.

The only problem is that neither New York Times excerpt highlighted by HL is anything close to “trashing.” The paper is simply and factually reporting on Walker’s professional trajectory, relying in part on an A.O. Scott film review.

HollywoodLife also mangles the meaning of a Vulture headline for Bilge Ebiri‘s article published Sunday. New York magazine is not reducing Walker to an “Everyman.” Rather, they were angling in on Walker’s charming and extremely rare post-Golden Age combination of an everyman’s personality with a Hollywood leading man’s good looks. They’re actually paying the late actor two separate compliments in that one, single headline.

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Star‘s James Heidenry: ‘Us Weekly is the biggest culprit of hypocrisy’

In Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, Star editor-in-chief James Heidenry tackles his newsstand nemeses head-on, calling People and Us Weekly “the mouthpiece of celebrity publicists” – and he didn’t mean that in a positive way.

Some of his other beefs with the mags? They pay celebrities for stories but don’t admit it, and they get most of their biggest “scoops” right from the pages of Star.

“Even Bonnie Fuller, who used to run Star magazine, doesn’t give us credit at HollywoodlLife.com. But Us Weekly, I think, is the biggest culprit of hypocrisy,” Heidenry said. “Us Weekly has Kim [Kardashian] on the cover saying ‘Don’t Call Me Fat,’ and when you open up the issue, it points out our cover and says ‘Look how these tabloids are making fun of her’ when they are doing it on the cover themselves — not making fun of her, but using Kim’s pregnancy to sell magazines and trying to take a holier-than-thou attitude. To me, it was just a lack of respect for their readers.”

For more of Heidenry’s thoughts on the competition plus what he looks for L.A. reporters, read So What Do You Do, James Heidenry, Editor-in-Chief of Star?

Remembering The Year That Was: FishbowlNY Editor On The Menu

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FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst visited the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast today, joining hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven to discuss the biggest media stories of 2009.

On Amanda’s list: stories about layoffs and magazine closings, but good news of circulation revenues climbing at places like The New York Times. Also, announcements of new magazine launches, like Afar and new Web sites, including Atlantic Wire, Mediaite and HollywoodLife.

Also discussed: the biggest stories of the year covered by the media — Balloon Boy, Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods among them — and how the media’s coverage has changed.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

HollywoodLife.com Snags Another NY Gossip Columnist

Laura Schreffler.jpgBonnie Fuller continues to beef up the staff of her Mail.com Media Corp.-owned celeb Web site HollywoodLife.

Just a few weeks after picking up Page Six reporter Corynne Steindler from The New York Post, Fuller has hired New York Daily News Gatecrasher columnist Laura Schreffler to serve as West Coast bureau chief. Before joining the Daily News, Schreffler worked as lifestyle editor at OK! magazine.

Fuller’s other recent hires include Will Lee, former New York bureau chief of TMZ.com. Lee was hired in September to serve as HollywoodLife’s executive editor, and he will work out of the publication’s Los Angeles office with Schreffler.

Full release after the jump

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Steindler Leaves Page Six To Join Bonnie Fuller

P6 masthead2.pngThe New York Observer reports that Corynne Steindler is leaving The New York Post‘s Page Six gossip column to join Bonnie Fuller‘s new venture HollywoodLife as a senior reporter.

Steindler is the third Page Six staffer to leave in the past few months, following the lead of Paula Froelich and Bill Hoffman, who departed in July.

HollywoodLife confirmed Steindler’s move this afternoon. “We are privileged to welcome such a seasoned reporter to HollywoodLife.com,” Fuller said. “With terrific experience breaking celebrity news, Corynne’s addition is a significant advantage to our strong and growing editorial team.”

Fuller has been recruiting some top gossip talent to her site, recently snagging TMZ‘s Will Lee to serve as executive editor.

Full release from HollywoodLife after the jump

Corynne Steindler Leaves Page Six for Bonnie Fuller’s Site, HollywoodLife.comThe Observer

Earlier: Jossip’s Steindler Jumps To Gossip’s Page Six

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Janice Min Set To Depart Us Weekly

us_weekly_min2.jpgJanice Min, longtime editor of celeb magazine Us Weekly said yesterday that she will be leaving her post when her $2.5 million contract expires at the beginning of next month.

Min told The New York Times she didn’t know what she would do next, “But I’m 39 and I’d like to have another career. I felt like I’d done every possible thing at Us Weekly to make it successful.”

In a letter to her staffers, obtained by Mediaite.com, Min said she had “decided it was time to try something else in my life, do a little Gosselin detox and occasionally go out on Monday nights.”

Executive editor Michael Steele will be taking over Min’s spot, the magazine’s owner Jann Wenner told the Times.

Former Us editor Bonnie Fuller hired Min as her number two in 2002, and Min took over the magazine’s top editor slot when Fuller left for Star a year later. Last week, Fuller was named editor-in-chief at celebrity Web site HollywoodLife, becoming the latest big name journalist snapped up by the site’s owner Jay Penske for his growing media empire. Might Min be eyeing a spot on Penske’s team? Or, conversely, does Penske have a place for the successful editor? It’s certainly possible, but no matter where she goes next, all eyes will be on her.

Bonnie Fuller Returns To Editor-In-Chief Spot at Celeb Web Site

bonnie.pngShe once helped celebrity magazine Us Weekly become a must-read and guided American Media, which publishes Star. Then Bonnie Fuller left the world of magazines last year to launch her own company, Bonnie Fuller Media. But now she’s put those plans on hold, returning to a role as editor-in-chief — of a Web site.

Yesterday, David Carr of The New York Times reported that Fuller had been named editor and president of HollywoodLife, a celebrity site based in Los Angeles owned by Mail.com Media Corporation.

Mail.com made a splash last month when it purchased Hollywood reporter Nikki Finke‘s Web site DeadlineHollywoodDaily.com. Carr also has a profile of Finke on today’s front page of the Times, in which he reveals that she “stands to make more than $5 million in the next eight years,” from the sale of her blog. “And her deal could go as high as $10 million,” Carr added, citing an anonymous source with knowledge of the matter.

So is Mail.com, which also owns Movieline.com and OnCars.com, finished snapping up big name media personalities, or are there more to come? And what exactly does Mail.com owner Jay Penske plan for the future of his media empire? Guess we’ll have to wait and see.

(Photo from Fuller’s Twitter page)