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Posts Tagged ‘Interactive Advertising Bureau’

Condé Nast’s Dawn Ostroff: ‘We Haven’t Even Scratched the Surface’

Former Lifetime, UPN and CW programming exec Dawn Ostroff is now the president of Condé Nast Entertainment, responsible for a prospective 100 digital series. During an appearance Monday at the Interactive Advertising Bureau MIXX Conference portion of Advertising Week New York, she colorfully framed how the audience-fragmentation writing was on the wall during her time at The CW.

In meetings with Les Moonves, Ostroff remembered that her boss would ask how it was possible that a show like Gossip Girl, on the lips of everyone, could have such mediocre Nielsen ratings. Ostroff would struggle to reply since DVR, social and Internet metrics were in their infancy. But, as she told IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg on stage:

“While I was at The CW, we single-handedly watched them [18 to 34-year-old viewers] migrate away from television on to other platforms. Legally or illegally, unfortunately.”

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Randall Rothenberg Departs Time Inc.

If Randall Rothenburg has a favorite Mother Goose nursery rhyme (what high level exec doesn’t?) we bet it’s “To Market,” which includes the line, “Home again, home again, jiggity-jig,” because Rothenburg is headed back to the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB).

Rothenburg joined Time Inc. in December, but he just announced his decision to leave Time and return to the IAB, his home – or home away from home – since 2007.

Rothenburg’s departure is just the latest drama to emerge from Time Inc. He was hired by Jack Griffin, who thought his expertise in the digital world would benefit Time and its many publications, but we’re sure he saw the writing on the wall when Griffin was fired, so leaving wasn’t that difficult of a decision.

In a memo circulated by Time, Rothenburg said, “I was attracted to Time Inc. by its fantastic brands and terrific people, and believe that the company is well positioned to take advantage of the digital revolution in media and marketing.”