TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Jayson Blair’

Jonah Lehrer Might Have Been Addicted to Lying

In an interview with Salon, Jayson Blair says that Jonah Lehrer’s tale reminds him of his own. Blair gives some great insight, and as we read the interview, we couldn’t help but notice how often the themes of addiction came up in Blair’s answers.

We understand that these are Bair’s comments and not Leher’s, but below are some excerpts that made us wonder: Was Lehrer addicted to lying?

Often people come into the office seeking me out because of what I went through and what I did, and they say to me, ‘I’ve done this really bad thing and I don’t ever want to do it again.’ And they come back two weeks later and say, ‘I did it again. I can’t stop the cycle once it starts.’ There are fire walls in life, things you never want to do, lines you never want to cross, because once you cross that line it becomes easier to do it again.

Addiction is a cycle. It starts with some feeling — insecurity, loneliness, etc. — and then progresses into a behavior meant to silence that unpleasant feeling, even if that behavior is something that will make things worse. But it stops the “pain” briefly, just long enough to make a person consider doing it again.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Children's Picture Book Writing

Children's Picture Book WritingStarting September 15, this part lecture, part workshop course will take you through the process of outlining, writing, editing, and submitting a children's picture book. Taught by a published children's book author, Dashka Slater will teach you how to write in pictures, hook readers and editors with your story, apply the nuts and bolts of marketing, and more. Register now! 

Chuck Philips Calls Out the LA Times

A remarkable essay has been published on the Village Voice website. Under the headline “Tupac Shakur, the Los Angeles Times, and Why I’m Still Unemployed: A Personal History by Chuck Philips,” the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist details for the first time his version of the events leading up to, and following, March 26, 2008.

That’s the day The Smoking Gun exposed as fake court documents referenced in a Calendar front-page story by Philips about a 1994 assault in Queens, NY on rapper Tupac Shakur. He says it was not his idea to web-publish and liberally source the FBI-302 documents, but rather that of his LAT editor and the paper’s lawyer. Philips also accuses the paper of failing to properly support one of their own by refusing to litigate against the target of his piece (and subsequent accuser) James “Jimmy Henchman” Rosemond:

Lawyers and editors rejected my recommendations, arguing it would be foolhardy to fight the case. The Times refused to defend the story in court. Instead, the paper crafted a retraction that sounded as if I had made up the entire story and sneaked it into print behind management’s back, without the knowledge, consent or guidance of senior editors and lawyers directly involved in its publication.

Read more

Nikki Finke is in The New Yorker

091012_r18911_p233.jpgWowie, Nikki Finke is now in The New Yorker? First the front page of the New York Times and now a Tad Friend piece?!

Is Nikki uber – uber-famous or are New York jounos getting lazy?

Anyway, the piece is mostly nice to Nikki.

And in case you’re wondering – of course Sharon Waxman is quoted in the piece because no one can write an article about Nikki Finke without her frenemy Sharon Waxman commenting.

This is the funniest line in there:

Waxman covered Hollywood for the Times from 2003 to 2007; though her reporting occasioned a number of corrections, she is aggressively self-confident.

Who has to have the disclaimer “her reporting occasioned a number of corrections” mentioned about them besides like Jayson Blair?

Previously on FBLA:

  • Breaking: Nikki Finke Story Maybe On Page One of NYT
  • Huffpo Takes on Sharon Waxman

    ILLUSTRATION: JAIME HERNANDEZ

  • Conde And Boxee Sign Deal|USA TODAY Reporter Moves To Copywriting|Maer Roshan Found|Another Online Ad Sales Report|Jayson Blair Speaks

    WebNewser: Condé Nast Digital has entered into a content sharing agreement with Boxee, the startup whose free software allows users to integrate personal media, Internet media and social networking tools. The deal will give Boxee users access to Wired.com and Style.com video content, and Style.com photo slideshows.

    AgencySpy: USA TODAY reporter Theresa Howard, who has been covering consumer marketing and advertising for the nation’s most read paper, is leaving her beat to join the enemy. She’s joining Crispin Porter + Bogusky as a copywriter.

    The Observer: Where did Maer Roshan, the editor of now-defunct Radar go? A year after his mag folded, Roshan can be found in Los Angeles, working on TV projects.

    Forbes: A new report shows that marketers will pay publishers an average of $2.27 for every reader they can get to enter information on their Web site. “That hefty price suggests publishers should consider abandoning cheap ads sold for guaranteed prices and should instead try to use space on their Web pages to convince readers to turn over their personal information.”

    The Coaching Commons: Last week we learned that disgraced New York Times reporter Jayson Blair is now working as a life coach. This week, Blair sat down for this lengthy interview.

    Enough About the News, Let’s Talk About Us — Why Don’t You Like Us?

    annietennis.jpgWow, so the New York Times seems to be doing its own peculiar impression of Woody Allen at his most neurotic. A recent reader’s survey from the Times wants to know what it is exactly about them that you don’t like. Was it that whole Judy Miller thing? The General Betray Us ad? Jason Blair? Israel? The Style Section? (kidding! Let’s not get crazy).

    Bruce Feirstein over at Vanity Fair‘s Politics&Power blog discovered the survey after randomly clicking through on a Drudge link. The VF people think the survey either signifies a “touchy feely” Times or a “paranoid and frightened” one. Apparently no one suggested it was a sign (albeit a disturbing one) of a paper attempting to keep its head above water during the newspaper world’s annus horribilis. Still, questions like “When you think of the New York Times what positive things come to mind?” reek of the worst kind of liberal cliche. It’s unclear whose idea the survey was, but assuming it came from the publishing end VF is probably correct in assuming its tone would make editorial “furious.” Furthermore, what purpose do questions over Palestinian coverage and whether or not the Times should have run the wire-tapping story earlier serve? Is it merely another case of “Punch” Sulzberger holding out a moose (as Pareene suggests) or are we transitioning into news by consensus? And anyway, isn’t that what blogs are for?