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Posts Tagged ‘Jill Abramson’

NY Times Makes Three Promotions

The New York Times has promoted both Janet Elder and Larry Ingrassia to deputy managing editor, and Rebecca Corbett to assistant managing editor.

See below for the memo from Jill Abramson, the Times’ executive editor, announcing the changes.

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NY Times Promotes Bruce Headlam and Peter Lattman

The New York Times has promoted Bruce Headlam and Peter Lattman. Details are below, followed by the memo from Jill Abramson, executive editor at the Times, that announced the changes.

  • Headlam, who has been with the Times’ media desk since 2008, will move to video, where he’ll become managing editor of video. He’ll report to Abramson. Headlam will be working closely with Rebecca Howard, general manager of video production.
  • Lattman succeeds Headlam as media editor. Lattman joined the Times in 2010. He has been covering Wall Street, white collar crime and more for DealBook since joining the paper.

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NY Times Washington Bureau Chief David Leonhardt to Step Down, Carolyn Ryan to Take Over [Updated]

NYtimes buildingPolitico is reporting that David Leonhardt, The New York Times’ Washington bureau chief, is stepping down and will be replaced by Carolyn Ryan, the Times’ political editor.

Leonhardt has been with the Times since 1999, and was named Washington bureau chief in 2011. He succeeded Dean Baquet, who was bumped up to managing editor.

Ryan was named political editor in May of this year. She previously served as the paper’s metro editor.

We reached out to the Times for comment and further information. We’ll update when we hear back.

Update (12:55 pm):
Jill Abramson sent out a memo explaining the changes. Leonhardt will now oversee a new vertical that will focus on the intersection of data and news (read: a new FiveThirtyEight). Also, the Times is launching a “tip sheet” startup for fans of Washington. Carl Hulse will be managing it. See below for Abramson’s full note.

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NY Times Launches ‘The New York Times Minute’ Video Feature

The New York Times is taking the phrase “New York minute” quite seriously. Today the paper launched “The New York Times Minute,” a one minute long video, posted three times per day. The videos — airing at 6 am, noon and 6 pm — will highlight the biggest stories at that moment. Think of it as the Times for people with really short attention spans.

“Video is a fast growing and important part of our news report,” said Jill Abramson, the Times’ executive editor, in a statement. “The New York Times Minute series is a natural extension of our journalism that allows our viewers a quick and useful way to keep up with the news.”

It’s not a bad idea, especially considering the Times posts links to the stores that are covered below the video. That gives people a fast and easy way to delve deeper into whatever interests them.

Morning Media Newsfeed: UK Targets Newspapers | CNN Renews Spurlock | Abramson Jabs Politico

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David Cameron: UK Government May ‘Act’ Against Newspapers Over Snowden Leaks
(Reuters)
British Prime Minister David Cameron said on Monday his government was likely to act to stop newspapers publishing what he called damaging leaks from former U.S. intelligence operative Edward Snowden unless they began to behave more responsibly. “If [newspapers] don’t demonstrate some social responsibility it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act,” Cameron told parliament, saying Britain’s Guardian newspaper had “gone on” to print damaging material after initially agreeing to destroy other sensitive data. BBC News The Guardian has insisted that its coverage of intelligence leaks prompted a necessary and overdue debate. The British newspaper has been the primary UK outlet for stories based on data leaked by whistleblower and ex-U.S. security analyst Snowden. The Guardian Newspaper and magazine publishers are seeking an injunction to prevent the government’s plan for a new press regulation regime getting the royal seal of approval this week. Industry bodies representing publishers said they would be seeking the injunction to stop the press regulation royal charter — backed by the three main parties and Hacked Off campaigners — going before the privy council for sealing by the Queen on Wednesday.

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Readers Question Vanity Fair ‘Powers That Be’

It’s one of two lists put forth in the November issue of Vanity Fair under the annual heading of “The New Establishment.”

VFNewEstablishment

The Powers That Be” ranks 25 “members of the power elite [who] demonstrate why they’re not going anywhere soon.” At press time, pretty much all readers who have taken the time to comment have a problem with the list, crowned by cover boy Jay Z and Beyoncé:

DentonFisk: Wow. What a dearth of talent! If this is the best the USA has to offer, we’re done. Most are celebrities for celebrity’s sake. These are the crypt keepers…

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NY Times Connections Gets You NY Times Wedding Announcements

wedding GIf you’ve ever dreamed of having your wedding described in the pages of The New York Times, here’s the key: Have a lot of money. Kidding! Sort of. A better way to find your Day Of Love in the paper is via connections. That had to have helped Richard Samson and Cornelia Griggs.

Samson (wedded to Howard McGillin) and Griggs (Robert Goldstone) both had their weddings announced in Sunday’s Times. Both have some strong ties to the paper. Samson is a senior counsel for the Times Company and Griggs is the daughter of Jill Abramson, executive editor of the paper.

We wish both couples all the happiness in the world. We’re sure staffers at the Times do too.

[Image: Flickr/Shardayyy]

Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN/PBS Doc Fallout | Times Co. CEO Dishes | WaPo‘s MLK Snub


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Was ESPN Sloppy, Naïve or Compromised? (ESPN / Ombudsman)
So what’s more damaging to a corporate image: to be considered sloppy, naïve or compromised? Or all three? You get to pick in the wake of ESPN’s announcement that it was removing its brand from an upcoming two-part documentary by PBS’ Frontline that “reveals the hidden story of the NFL and brain injuries” (or so it claims in a controversial trailer). The ESPN action drew immediate media and mailbag accusations that the NFL had pressured the network into severing ties to the PBS films. I thought the best and briefest characterization came from Ombuddy Philip Berenbroick of Arlington, Va., who saw ESPN’s decision as an example of “the dueling journalism and profit motives [via protecting valued partners] at the network.” It’s hard to argue with that depiction. NYT ESPN’s divorce with PBS came a week after the NFL voiced its displeasure with the documentary at a lunch between league and ESPN executives, according to two people with direct knowledge of the situation. The meeting took place at Patroon, near the league’s Midtown Manhattan headquarters, according to the two people, who requested anonymity because they were prohibited by their superiors from discussing the matter publicly. It was a table for four: Roger Goodell, commissioner of the NFL; Steve Bornstein, president of the NFL Network; John Skipper, ESPN’s president; and John Wildhack, ESPN’s executive vice president for production. Deadline Hollywood The League Of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis trailer was screened at an Aug. 6 media panel and unveiled without Skipper’s or ESPN’s approval. Skipper complained the video was “sensational” and made him “quite unhappy.” He didn’t like the tagline, “Get ready to change the way you see the game,” or the trailer’s final quote from a neuropathologist on the extent of brain injuries in the NFL, “I’m really wondering if every single football player doesn’t have this.” Media watchers say pressure from the NFL led to ESPN’s sudden withdrawal and now Skipper admits he was embarrassed by the Frontline documentary. HuffPost In the wake of a report that ESPN bowed out of a joint investigative project with PBS on NFL player concussions, the union representing players said it was a “disappointing day for journalism” if the sports network caved on the series out of business concerns. “I think any time that business interests get in the way of telling an important story like the one Frontline was working on, I think that that’s a sad day, regardless of why or who or what the circumstances were,” George Atallah, spokesman for the NFL Players Association, told HuffPost. CJR / Full-Court Press Whatever the case, it looks bad for both parties. The NFL is being sued over its decades of “Don’t worry, it’s just a bruise” approach to medicine, a personal-injury lawsuit that has expanded to some 4,500 plaintiffs. Reports of the kind broadcast by ESPN and PBS not only damage the league’s brand equity, but have the potential to inflict further direct damages in existing and potential lawsuits. That’s not the sort of benefits promised by a broadcast partner when it agrees to pay more than a billion dollars in rights fees to the NFL.

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New York Times and Guardian to Publish New Edward Snowden Documents

The New York Times is finally getting in on the Edward Snowden action. Snowden had previously avoided giving the NSA documents he obtained to the Times because he was scared the paper would cooperate with the government. However, BuzzFeed reports that things have changed because of Snowden’s information that links the NSA with its UK counterpart, Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). A spokesperson for The Guardian sent the following email to BuzzFeed:

In a climate of intense pressure from the UK government, The Guardian decided to bring in a US partner to work on the GCHQ documents provided by Edward Snowden. We are continuing to work in partnership with the NYT and others to report these stories.

The discussions between the papers was carried out in person between Guardian editors and Jill Abramson, the Times’ executive editor. Rumor has it that Scott Shane, a national security reporter for the Times, is currently working on a set of stories based on Snowden’s information. The articles will be published jointly with The Guardian.

By publishing new Snowden documents, the Times is guaranteed to get a lot of unwanted attention from the government. The Times, meanwhile, gets its hands on a huge story.

This is going to be fun.

[Image: ABC News]

Jill Abramson: The NY Times Will Still be in Print in Five Years

As part of The New Republic’s special New York Times package, Jill Abramson, the paper’s executive editor, spoke with Michael Kinsley. Here are our favorite quotes from Abramson.

On the rumor that she’s mean:

Well my answer is, I’m not. And most of the people who know me well are somewhat surprised by that stereotype, just because I’m not someone who frequently expresses anger or acts in a high-handed way. I’m trying to think of the other stereotypical behaviors.

On the Times being perceived as a liberal paper:

Abe Rosenthal was once asked what he wanted on his headstone, and he said he wanted it just to say, ‘He kept the paper straight.’ And I think about that a lot. You can verify that in news meetings I sometimes say, ‘This is skewed too far to the left,’ or ‘The mix of stories seems overweeningly appealing to a reader with a certain set of sensibilities and it shouldn’t.’

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