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Posts Tagged ‘Justine Rosenthal’

Justine Rosenthal Departs Newsweek/The Daily Beast

Justine Rosenthal is leaving Newsweek/The Daily Beast. Capital New York reports that Rosenthal, who was editing Newsweek and The Daily Beast after Tunku Varadarajan left in March, will be succeeded by Richard Just, with help from Louise Roug.

In a note to staffers, Tina Brown said Rosenthal’s skills and determination will be missed:

Justine took over Newsweek at a challenging time for the company in November of 2011 and immediately took command, cultivating writers and creating memorable stories that made us all proud…

Under Justine’s editorship we were able to reverse Newsweek’s many years of decline and breathe life back into the magazine both as a print edition and in the stellar digital format that she and the team have continued to produce each week.

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Orgs to Newsweek: Stop F-ing Up

Some organizations, such as public television stations, give out subscriptions to Newsweek as gifts for donors. Those companies are grateful — after all, according to the New York Times, those gifts have helped raise millions — but they’re also starting to get mad at Newsweek. The problem? Too many filthy words.

Apparently some of these stations are complaining that Newsweek uses profanity too often, and they might move on if things don’t change:

Bill Sanford, chief executive of Lakeland Public Television in Bemidji, Minn., told fellow station executives this month via e-mail that a major donor had complained, and that he, too, wanted his station ‘to offer premiums that reflect our values. Being family-friendly is one of them.’ He suggested that Time or U.S. News & World Report might ‘fit our values better.’

Justine Rosenthal, Newsweek’s executive editor, thought nothing of using words such as “tits,” “shit” and more, as long as they’re within the flow of a story. “We do not use profanity unless within a quote or in the context of a story and care is taken to ensure it is never used gratuitously,” Roesnthal told the Times, via email.

Hopefully that clears the f*cking problem up.

Tom Brokaw, Vernon Jordan and the Shy Divorcee

1003_mockup.gifIt was SRO at Michael’s today. The dining room was so jam packed every sqaure inch was occupied by a mogul (Mel Karmazin!), media heavyweight (Tom Brokaw, Jon Meacham, Jeff Zucker), or social swan (divorcee of the moment, Mercedes Bass who moved to the Garden Room with pal Lynn Nesbitt when the decibel level and fabulousness of it all got to be too much).  Just a thought: if you’re looking for a quiet, out of the way lunch spot, you might want to consider going somewhere else on Wednesday.

I was joined today by Forbes‘ new editor, Randall Lane. In his new position, Randall is presiding over familiar territory to him: the lives of the ridiculously rich and ambitious. In a previous life, he was the editor of Trader Monthly which chronicled the age of excess of the Wall Streeter of days gone by.  That experience later provided plenty of fodder for his book, The Zeroes: My Misadventures in the Decade When Wall Street Went Insane. In the interim, he’s been an editor at large for Newsweek and written for The Daily Beast. Having worked with him years ago when he was the editor in chief on the startup Justice, which covered the hot trials and legal issues of the day, I was thrilled when I heard he’d gotten the top job at Forbes back in September.

Randall first worked at Forbes fresh out of college in the nineties and spent six years “chasing rich people” and working on the franchise’s venerated power lists which required (and still do) hundreds of hours of research and manpower. “In some ways, it feels like I never left,” he tells me.

Diane Clehane and Randall Lane
Randall Lane and yours truly

Since taking the helm, Randall has been on a mission to make the book more visually exciting with interesting photography (the arresting cover image of Bill Gates in the “World’s 70 Most Powerful People” issue is a winner), fresh design elements courtesy of the Brooklyn-based shop Athletics, a livelier front of book section and more in-depth profiles on people the Forbes reader wants to know about.  Exhibit A: The cover story in the November 7 issue on Dropbox’s Drew Houston, the 28 year-old mogul who turned down Steve Jobs and is now worth $600 million which drew one million hits on Forbes.com.

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