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Posts Tagged ‘Ken Auletta’

2011 Mirror Awards Winners

Today the Newhouse School of Public Communications held its annual Mirror Awards, which celebrates the best in media industry journalism. If it sounds a little absurd, well, it is. But as we know, every award is a little odd, so on with the winners!

Best Single Article, Traditional Media: Gabriel Sherman, “Chasing Fox”  (New York)
Best Single Article, Digital Media: Jim Hopkins, “All Shook Up” (Gannett Blog)
• Best Profile, Traditional Media: Ken Auletta, “The Networker” (The New Yorker)
• Best Profile, Digital Media: Joel Meares, “The Biggest Fish in Albany?” (Columbia Journalism Review)
• Best Commentary, Traditional MediaJames Wolcott (Vanity Fair)
Best Commentary, Digital MediaEric Alterman (Center for American Progress)
• Best In-depth Piece, Traditional Media: Mary Van de Kamp Nohl, “Paper Money” (Milwaukee Magazine)

The New Yorker‘s Ken Auletta Hails James Murdoch’s “Independence”

The news that James Murdoch was promoted to Deputy COO at News Corp. by his father, CEO Rupert Murdoch, hatched more than a few dismissive comments about nepotism.

But in the New Yorker’s News Desk Blog, James Murdoch has an unexpected ally: Ken Auletta devotes a brief piece to proclaiming James Murdoch not only independent of his father, but also something of a Bourbon-on-the-rocks drinking renegade… with a tattoo! (We don’t find out what the tattoo is, sadly.)

We also learn that Murdoch dropped out of Harvard to go into the music industry, spent time “prowling” for internet companies, and met Auletta once at a restaurant when no one else from News Corp. would.

How will News Corp. ever keep this rebel under control?? Perhaps by imprisoning him in the Muppet Mansion.

Auletta on Letterman: I Bet They’ll Settle

This morning, mediabistro.com’s senior editor Donya Blaze spoke with New Yorker columnist and author of “Googled: The End of the World as we Know It,” Ken Auletta for our upcoming video series Media Beat. In addition to discussing the book (Nora Ephron helped him out with the title), we asked Auletta about the Letterman extortion plot:

• We’ll be launching MediaBeat soon, on mediabistro.com, across our blog network and on MediaBeat.com featuring the biggest names in media, PR, advertising and TV. Stay tuned…

Excitement For BusinessWeek Deal At MPA Conference

MIS.jpgYesterday, we spent a few hours at the Magazine Publishers of America‘s Magazine Innovation Summit. In between panels and interviews like The New York TimesDavid Carr‘s Q&A with Ken Auletta of The New Yorker (right), we got a chance to catch up with some of New York media’s movers and shakers and pick their brains.

First, we asked Carr what he thought of Bloomberg LP’s acquisition of BusinessWeek. The media columnist was practically giddy with excitement. “It’s great news for people like you and me,” Carr told us, complaining that the media industry has been sorely lacking in fun deals to report on. “I couldn’t help but get involved in Stephanie’s story,” he said referring to the article about the deal he co-bylined with Stephanie Clifford for the Times yesterday.

Carr’s excitement was mirrored by BusinessWeek.com‘s John Byrne, who interviewed Netflix CEO Reed Hastings after lunch.

“There was a little activity at BusinessWeek this morning,” Byrne said. He then went on to say how happy he was to be going to work for Bloomberg, remarking that it was a “great place” for the business magazine to be.

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Mirror, Mirror: Big Fish Dominate Media Beat Awards

r111news.jpgThe Mirror Awards, begun in 2006 with the intention of honoring the work of media beat writers and Web sites, have proven a good forum for the industry to honor reporters and columnists like Times columnist David Carr, the New Yorker‘s Ken Auletta, and Joe Strupp over at Editor & Publisher. All three got their annual nods (three for three guys!), and this year’s finalists are, again, pretty much all pulled from big media companies. Out of 140 entries, 12 of the 29 nominees hail from Conde Nast. There are a couple unconventional picks, but despite the fact that there are plenty of excellent smaller players these days on the media criticism beat, most came from the big guys. Regardless, congrats to all.

Full list of nominees after the jump…

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The Who’s Who of Media at Sun Valley

Dan Cox, on special assignment for FishbowlLA, covering the 2008 Sun Valley Media Conference.

SV2008y.jpgThough Allen & Company are extremely tight-lipped about everything of interest at the Sun Valley Media Conference, a few small bits and pieces are leaking out on the first day.

A list of attendees surfaced and included such mega-moguls as Paul G. Allen of Vulcan Inc., Emilio Azcarraga of Grupo Televisa, National Hockey League Commissioner Gary Bettman, Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes, New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, CNN’s Anderson Cooper, independent writer Ken Auletta, BET chairman and CEO Debra L. Lee, Diane von Furstenberg of her eponymous studio, National Basketball Association Commissioner David J. Stern and Chicago Bulls and Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf.

Weirder still was the inclusion of celebrity chef Rachael Ray, of Watch Entertainment Inc. The assembled media standing outside the Sun Valley Lodge joke that she might be here to cook dinner for all these moguls.

In true Allen & Co. behavior, the list of those invited also had a schedule, which carefully omitted anything specific with just early morning discussion or meeting events labeled as simply “Presentation.” After that came, “White Water Raft Trip,” “Golf at the Sun Valley Golf Course” and “Biking, Fly-Fishing, Hiking, Trail Rides” and “Yoga.”

Those moguls sure know how to do it right.

Rupe Street Journal To Give Howard Rubenstein More Friends

rubenstein_072007.jpg

So who, aside from Rupert Murdoch and some Dow Jones stockholders, is going to benefit most from a Rupe Street Journal? How about Howard Rubenstein, Murdoch’s PR powerbroker, and his clients? The New Yorker‘s Ken Auletta, via Beet.TV:

Howard Rubenstein has ties to many public officials and clients that are important to a New York newspaper. Rupert Murdoch is his friend, and client, and the New York Post is also a client. Aside from Rubenstein’s considerable skills, every Post reporter knows that he is not just another flack. And should Murdoch acquire the Wall Street Journal, Rubenstein will have more friends.

EARLIER:

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  • CNBC To Re-Air Auletta-Moonves ‘Sexist’ Interview

    rather_moonves_061207.jpg

    Does ‘tart’ imply female?

    Not sure how relevant the discussion will look six days later, but CNBC plans to run Ken Auletta‘s Tuesday breakfast interview with CBS chief Les Moonves — during which Moonves called Dan Rather‘s “tarting up” remarks about Katie Couric sexist and set off a bit of a firestorm — this weekend.

    Meanwhile, an emailer comes down hard on American Women in Radio and Television president Marie Brennan‘s slam of Rather:

    Who is Maria Brennan? Does she speak English? Does she write for a living? Does she have a dictionary? Does she ever open it? Does she know what she doesn’t know? “Tart” does imply female. But “tarting up”–the phrase used by Rather (of whom I’m certainly no fan)– is NOT gender-specific. I’m embarrassed for my (ignorant) sex.

    EARLIER:

  • Radio & TV Women Blast Dan Rather: Now It’s Personal
  • Rather-Moonves: War Of Words

  • Robbed At The Mirror Awards

    logo_mirror_awards.gifAndersen, Auletta, Kurtz also shut out

    The first annual Mirror Awards were presented at a Meredith Vieira-hosted luncheon today at the W hotel in Midtown, and our mediabistro.com mothership — a finalist in the media information services category — lost to HealthNewsReview.org. In other words, we were robbed.

    Still, we weren’t the only overwhelming favorite among the 23 finalists to go home empty-handed. New York Times media man David Carr won for best column, upsetting his former boss Kurt Andersen (“Kurt plucked me off a turnip truck when I got to New York”) and Washington Post media guy Howard Kurtz, who was 0-for-2. Kurtz’s CNN show, Reliable Sources, lost to the American Journalism Review for overall excellence.

    The New Yorker‘s Ken Auletta, praised for his profile of CNN’s Lou Dobbs, watched the best article award go to New York magazine’s Phillip Weiss for his profile of Craig Newmark, craigslist’s lovable nerd.

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    Rather-Moonves: War Of Words

    rather_moonves_061207.jpg

    Some juicy Dan Rather-Les Moonves point-counterpoint action — if you’re into that sort of thing.

    First up, Rather, on Katie Couric and the CBS Evening News:

    “You know, she tried to change networks, which is always difficult and change the programs at the same time. They’ve done all of the usual things. They changed the set. They changed the executive producers. They changed the graphics person, lately, forced out a guy who had been there, Ned Steinberg, for many, many years. They make all those kind of the superficial changes. I do want to say that, I think, under Rick Kaplan, that they have tried to harden up the broadcast in recent days, but that is a relative phrase, harden it up. That, you know, the trend line continues, as I say, dumbing it down, tarting it up, going to celebrity coverage rather than war coverage.”

    Then Moonves at this morning’s breakfast with Ken Auletta:

    Moonves called the remarks “sexist” and said he was surprised at the amount of negative coverage Couric was receiving. Couric, the first solo female news anchor, has been struggling in the ratings. “She’s been on the air for nine months. Let’s give her a break.”

    Then Rather, today:

    “It’s insulting and disappointing that Les Moonves, who know a lot about entertainment, would try to mask the real point of that comment. This isn’t a Katie Couric problem,” he said. “It has nothing to do with her gender.”

    EARLIER:

  • Ken Auletta To Undress Les Moonves
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