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Posts Tagged ‘LA Weekly’

Artie Lange on Overcoming ‘Toughest’ of All Addictions – Heroin

TheFixlogoSince Artie Lange miraculously walked himself back from the edge of the abyss, he has been doing a lot of interviews about his life and new book. But there’s likely no more apt a place to find the one-time Howard Stern sidekick talking about his hard-fought recovery from heroin and other addictions than The Fix.

The website, which focuses on the issues of addiction and recovery, relaunched this week after taking a summer break. Overseeing these efforts is newly installed publisher and CEO Jay Levin, who previously founded LA Weekly.

The Fix plans to post at least five new features per week, along with a similar amount of personal essays and eight news items. Here’s Lange’s answer to the first question from The Fix contributor McCarton Ackerman – Where are you in your sobriety these days?:

“I’ve have had two relapses in the last 18 months, but have been clean for three months now. The last relapse was from painkillers I was taking for an injury. They were given to me by a doctor, but I didn’t take them as prescribed and finished a month’s prescription in about a day and a half. I got to a meeting and stopped myself, but I would definitely consider that to be a relapse.”

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

@HuffPoSpoilers Has Some Suggestions for Arianna

There’s a pretty funny open letter today in LA Weekly. It’s by Alex Mizrahi (pictured), the cheeky operator of the popular Twitter feed @HuffPoSpoilers, and is addressed to Arianna Huffington.

Mizrahi launched his feed in 2012 as an exasperated response to the click-bait tactics of The Huffington Post’s main Twitter account. His musings have gained a lot of traction this year and, after attending the Weekly‘s recent Web Awards in Los Angeles, the New York-based Mizrahi felt it was a good time to go beyond 140 characters:

You employ some very smart and talented social media editors with personality and character on their personal Twitter feeds, yet @HuffingtonPost manages to be the lowest of Lowest Common Denominators, relying on the words and phrases so worn-out and bland they’ve been stripped of any meaning. Ever realize how many things are the best/worst/biggest/cutest/most [adjective] EVER?…

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Journo Challenges Courtney Love’s Recollection of ‘Pugilistic’ Events

One of the more entertaining celebrity interviews published this week was a Q&A in LA Weekly with Courtney Love. The singer-songwriter-troublemaker was in free-wheeling form for a telephone interview with “West Coast Sound” reporter Lina Locaro, talking about her stripper days, a key early review from Robert Hilburn in the LA Times and more.

However, judging by reaction in the comments from Belissa Cohen, who once wrote the Weekly‘s influential “L.A. Dee Da” column, the Q&A should be taken with a large grain of salt. To Love’s account of how an altercation with the journalist went down, Cohen had this to say:

Courtney has always felt free to make up “truths” and history and in this interview she does it again. I never had a cousin who worked for Gloria Allred, who I had never met before (I cold-called her office) but who gladly took my case against the oft-violent Ms. Love; I never shoved Courtney (she is much taller and bigger than I am), and what she says she said to me during the altercation that she instigated is not at all what she said.

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Hours Before Fiery Crash, Michael Hastings Asked to Borrow Neighbor’s Car

In the wake of yesterday’s release of the Michael Hastings autopsy results, LA Weekly reporter Gene Maddaus leads off this week’s fascinating cover story with provocative thoughts from the reporter’s former LA apartment neighbor.

Jordanna Thigpen tells Maddaus she and Hastings immediately bonded after he arrived at her Hollywood Hills complex in February, due to the fact that both of them had lost loved ones in tragic accidents. She also outlines her newfound friend’s increasingly “erratic” behavior:

Helicopters often circle over the [Hollywood] hills, but Hastings believed there were more of them around whenever he was at home, keeping an eye on him. He came to believe his Mercedes was being tampered with. “Nothing I could say could console him,” Thigpen says…

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New Owners — Kind Of — For LA Weekly

Village Voice Media, the parent company of the LA Weekly, is dismantling. The company’s 13 alternative newspapers are being purchased by a group of top VVM executives, led by chief operating officer Scott Tobias. The new owners are calling themselves Voice Media Group and will operate out of Denver. Tobias will serve as CEO, Jeff Mars (formerly VVM’s vice president of financial operation) will be chief financial officer, and Christine Brennan (formerly the executive managing editor of VVM) will serve as executive editor for the new company.

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. Brennan, a.k.a. “The Wicked Witch of Westword,” sure does like to fire people, (or “cut the fat” as she puts it) so we can probably expect more carnage on the alt-weekly horizon. Fingers crossed it doesn’t reach the LA Weekly.

Our hometown alt-weekly was last purchased in 2005 when New Times Media, run by Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin, purchased Village Voice Media and adopted the company name. Lacey and Larkin will retain Backpage.com, the online classified ad site that was the most profitable — and controversial — part of Village Voice Media.

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New TV Ad by Anti-Sex Trafficking Activists Calls For Closure of Backpage.com Sex Ads

Village Voice Media, the parent company of LA Weekly, continues to be targeted by activists fighting against child sex trafficking. The source of the controversy is the adult services ads on the VVM-owned classified advertising website Backpage.com. Despite numerous documented cases of pimps using the site to sell sex with trafficked women and children, VVM has resisted calls to shut down the highly profitable section.

With the advertisement below, sponsored by social service organization FAIR Girls, activists hope to increase public pressure on VVM to remove prostitution ads from Backpage.com. The ad, which will first air this Sunday on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, encourages viewers to visit the FAIR Girls website, where they can sign a petition urging VVM to shut down the adult services section on Backpage.com.

LA Weekly‘s “Lost” Riots Issue Now Online

But it can’t be found on the LA Weekly website. The issue is available for download through Los Angeles magazine, thanks to editor Mary Melton, who scanned the May 8, 1992 issue after the LA Weekly claimed the paper hadn’t covered the riots 20 years ago.

   

To date, the aforementioned LA Weekly blog post remains fiercely critical of the paper’s coverage in ’92, despite the revelation that they missed an entire issue dedicated to the riots, one they confess to not having read. Why a newspaper would choose trashing its own legacy over re-writing a blog post is beyond us.

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Venice Resident Filing Complaint Against Blogger

We admit it.

Sometimes bloggers can cross the line.

And sometimes we need to be put in check, like Venice Beach resident Karen Wolfe plans on doing to Venice Stakeholders Association president and blogger Mark Ryavec.

Ryavec (who sounds like a bit of a nutjob) listed the names and home addresses of 10 politicians, journalists and activists — including Wolfe — on his website as places where the homeless could set up camp and sleep overnight because he considered them advocates in the ongoing battle between Venice residents and transients.

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Wonkette Editor and LA Weekly Reporter Engage in Twitter Blood Sport

Wonkette’s editor and new owner Rebecca Schoenkopf got into a tiff Monday with LA Weekly staff reporter Dennis Romero over a Tweet containing a grammatical error. Then, thankfully, things snowballed.

This Fishie wandered into the flamewar a little late, and by then the catfight was in full swing. “You got butthurt,” Rebecca taunted Dennis, “Admit something for once in your life.” Dennis replied, “Glad to see I’m still in your thoughts. I, like the rest of the planet, had forgotten u exist.”

It was too juicy to ignore.  So we did a little digging and here, dear readers, is how journos bitch slap each other via the humble Tweet:


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Former Underage Prostitute Sold on Backpage.com: ‘Like Going Back to Slave Times’

The classified advertising website Backpage.com makes approximately $22 million a year from escort ads, and a portion of those ads are selling victims of human trafficking. Nicholas Kristof gave a voice to one of those victims in an op-ed for the New York Times, where he once again made the case for the website’s closure.

As a minor, ‘Alissa’ was trafficked by pimps on Backpage.com. Alissa was her street name; she told Kristof she didn’t want to use her real name for fear Village Voice Media, the owner of Backpage.com, would retaliate. And VVM has in the past used the editorial pages of their newspapers, including the LA Weekly, to mock critics.

Kristof acknowledges that sex trafficking is a complicated issue, that many of the prostitution ads on Backpage.com are placed by adult women of their own volition, and that simply closing down the site won’t make sex slavery go away. And sex workers have come forward to argue that closing Backpage.com would make prostitution more dangerous, not less.

But to a victim like Alissa, providing any forum for trafficking is unacceptable. “For a Web site like Backpage to make $22 million off our backs, it’s like going back to slave times.” she told Kristoff.

(Photo: Ashley Gilbertson/VII / The New York Times)

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