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Posts Tagged ‘Lawrence Ingrassia’

New York Times Business Editor Lashes Back at Public Editor

Everyone loves a good drama, right? Well here’s one to start your week off with. Yesterday, The New York Times’ Public Editor, Arthur Brisbane, attacked the paper’s Business section and DealBook for not including enough information for the general public. Instead, Brisbane wrote, the section functions like a tabloid and gives way too much credence to our economy, which isn’t exactly powerful anymore.

As you can imagine, this stung the Times’ Business Editor, Lawrence Ingrassia. Romenesko intercepted a letter that Ingrassia fired off to staffers in which Ingrassia says, “For the first time, I felt that a public editor column was so absurd and so poorly reasoned that I felt compelled to write a response.” Alright! Fighting words, right?

Ingrassia then follows the note to staffers with his letter to Brisbane. He begins the latter with, “Your column left me wondering how closely you read the Times – or at least our financial coverage. There is far more financial news, of all kinds, than ever before. Not less, as your column strangely asks.”

Head over to Romenesko for the entire memo. We’ll let you know who wins the inevitable thumb wrestling match.

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Web Journalists To Debate Business Model At Upcoming Mediabistro Panel

keyboard.jpgNext week, mediabistro will be hosting a panel that will discuss how social media is changing the face of journalism, whether an online business model is on the horizon and what that business model may look like.

We suspect this panel, moderated by BusinessWeek media columnist Jon Fine, will be similar to last week’s Reuters <a href="panel or this week’s Gotham Media panel about the media in crisis. However, while Reuters and Gotham Media offered insight from “old media” editors like Lawrence Ingrassia from The New York Times, the Financial TimesChrystia Freeland and Andrew Edgecliff-Johnson and Air America‘s Bennett Zier, next week’s panel will have a distinctive point of view from panelists with vast online experience including NYU journalism professor and blogger Jay Rosen, Mediaite.com Editor at Large Rachel Sklar, blogger Maeghan Carberry and former Star-Ledger staffer Matt Romanoski, who helped found NewJerseyNewsroom.com.

In the hopes of learning a little bit more about what this panel will focus on, we picked moderator Fine’s brain for a bit. “There isn’t an answer,” Fine said of the ever elusive online business model question for media companies. “But if you can get people to pay for something you’re in good shape.”

Expect panelists to wrestle with this conundrum, offer suggestions and advice and describe their own experiences. It all goes down July 16.

(Photo via flickr)

The Future Of Multiplatform Journalism: Giving Readers What They Want

reuters panel.pngAfter wrapping up two days of the Personal Democracy Forum yesterday, we ran over to a panel hosted by Reuters and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers discussing the future of journalism in a multimedia world.

Moderated by Reuters’ global managing editor Betty Wong, the panel included New York Times business and financial editor Lawrence Ingrassia, a very pregnant Financial Times U.S. managing editor Chrystia Freeland, Columbia Journalism School dean Sree Sreenivasan and mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby.

Wong opened up the conversation by asking the panelists how media companies can make the best of all their resources, in order to take advantage of the many different platforms available.

“We all have to ask ourselves, ‘What do our readers really want?’” Freeland said. She added that journalists are entrepreneurial at heart and want to create a brand and a Web presence for themselves, but it’s up to the editors and management to decide what’s best for the news organization. “The turning point came when journalists realized that it is in their personal interest to have a Web presence,” she said. “Journalists became journalists to become famous and make a name for themselves.”

Photo: Thomson Reuters Markets CEO Devin Wenig (right) introduces the panel featuring (from left) Touby, Sreenivasan, Freeland and Ingrassia

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NYT Snags Three Loeb Business Journalism Awards; WSJ, “60 Minutes” Each Get Two

loeb.pngLast night, UCLA’s Anderson School of Management presented its 2009 Gerald Loeb Awards at the New York Athletic Club.

The New York Times was the big winner of the night, with business and financial editor Lawrence Ingrassia receiving the Lawrence Minard Editor Award and the paper and its magazine winning three of the 12 competition categories including the Large Newspaper and Magazine categories and the Best Writing award, which went to Gretchen Morgenson. (Rick Rothacker of The Charlotte Observer also won in the Best Writing category.)

The Wall Street Journal and CBS News’ “60 Minutes” both took home two awards each, and now defunct business magazine Portfolio earned one win in the Feature Writing category for Michael Lewis‘ story “The End.”

A full list of the winners after the jump

Earlier: Loeb Award Finalists Announced; Times, Economist Editors Get Career Achievement Awards

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Loeb Award Finalists Announced; Times, Economist Editors To Get Career Achievement Awards

loeb.jpgToday, UCLA’s Anderson School of Management announced the finalists for its 2009 Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism.

The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times had the most finalists, with seven each across multiple categories. The Journal was nominated in the large newspaper, commentary, breaking news, beat writing and feature writing categories, while the Times also picked up noms for large newspaper reporting, breaking news and beat writing, and was recognized for excellence in online reporting and magazine reporting as well.

Bloomberg, “60 Minutes” and CBS were also recognized with a handful of nominations each, while now defunct magazine Portfolio received three nods.

In addition, former editor-in-chief of The Economist Bill Emmott will be receiving a Loeb Lifetime Achievement Award and Lawrence Ingrassia, business and financial editor at the Times will be awarded the Lawrence Minard Editor Award at the awards dinner here in New York on June 29.

A full list of the finalists is after the jump

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