TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘magazine writing’

Earn $1.50 A Word And Up At This Parenting Mag

AmericanBabyAmerican Baby magazine has been doling out mothering advice since 1938, and it’s not stopping anytime soon. The monthly pub’s key demographic these days are first-time millennial moms seeking advice on everything baby related.

The mag’s content is 50 percent freelance written and their various online counterparts, including Parenting.com, are in need of fresh content. The pub’s editors dish on the coverage they’re looking for:

American Baby is specifically targeted to the first-time, millennial mom in her 20s to early 30s, and that focus has a large impact on the book’s style and tone. “We’re very modern about our approach to having a baby, and I think that’s reflected in the writing,” says Mindy Walker, American Baby’s executive editor. “It’s very friendly, but we also use a lot of authority. We don’t dumb it down for the reader; we keep it very direct and approachable.”

To learn more about how to get published in this pub, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: American Baby.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Mediabistro Course

Get a Literary Agent

Get a Literary AgentStarting August 6, learn how to find the right agent for your book and write a query that will get the deal done! Taught by Barbara Clark, a book agent and publishing consultant, you will learn the best methods for finding a literary agent, the proper protocol and etiquette for seeking literary representation, how to send queries and more. Register now!

How To Get Your Personal Essay Published

CraftPersonalEssays

The personal essay is enjoying a surge of popularity. We share more personal information online than ever before, whether it’s on social media, blogs or even national publications.

Personal essays force you to observe your life from a different perspective, to get inspired from your own experiences and to be brave and share controversial opinions. But first, you need to get your work published:

Unless you already have a relationship with an editor or publication, you need to write your essay before sending it out — rather than selling it as an idea in a pitch letter. Carinn Jade, blogger at Welcome To The Motherhood, prefers to have a particular market in mind when she’s crafting her essays. “It’s really about knowing the periodical or site, knowing their voice and point of view and tailoring [your piece] to fit with their content.” She recommends reading profusely, finding publications that speak to you and trying to join that community instead of doing a broad search for markets.

For more tips on writing personal essays, read: Your Life in 1,000 Words: The Craft Of Personal Essays.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Globetrotting Freelancers Wanted at Afar

AfarIn order to pique editors’ interest at Afar, freelancers must be willing to veer off the tourist-trodden paths to explore indigenous cultures. Launched in August 2009, the pub celebrates experiential travel all over the globe, covering destinations abroad and in the U.S., with an in-depth perspective.

“So many of the other magazines out there were focusing on sightseeing and escapist travel, where you just sort of ticked things off the list. We really felt like there were travelers out there who weren’t being reached, who traveled to really connect with locals and come back with a deeper understanding of a place and its people,” said editor-in-chief Julia Cosgrove.

With that in mind, freelancers interested in contributing need to bring their A-game (think affluence and authenticity) to snag an assignment. For pitching etiquette and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Afar.

Sherry Yuan

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Get Published by Top Magazines with Sue Carswell

Want to write for top publications? Now you can. Sue Carswell, a reporter and researcher at Vanity Fair, instructs our Magazine Writing class starting January 16 in New York. Under her guidance, you’ll find out what editors want, create two polished articles and corresponding pitch letters, and get your writing noticed by top magazines.

With hundreds of inspired students and tons of praise, Sue has an impressive track record with Mediabistro. One student says,

“Sue was fabulous! Each week she had us interview a celebrity and we had a chance to have a paid byline. What a terrific opportunity for any new writer and what a thrill. She is very knowledgeable, entertaining, and encourages all of us to get published. I would take any class she teaches in a heartbeat.” — Dr. Cynthia Paulis

Students who have taken this class have been published in Wired, InTouch Weekly, ESPN the Magazine, and more. Spots are limited, so don’t wait! Register today.

 

Get $2 a Word Writing for More

Since its launch, More has stayed true to its mission to explore “what it’s like to be a woman of style and substance right now.” Under its current EIC Lesley Jane Seymour, the mag has expanded its focus to include women ages 35 to 60, turbo-charged its design and expanded fashion and beauty coverage. The pub has also added some work- and money-related service features, because “the current economic times demand it,” said managing editor Ila Stanger.

Seventy percent of the pub is freelance written, and all sections are open to pitches. The best bet for writers looking to break into the book is to pitch a personal essay. Just remember: More‘s readership is “sophisticated, well-educated, affluent and self-confident, with interests as wide-ranging as their achievements,” said Stanger, so make sure you strike the right tone when pitching.

For more info, read How To Pitch: More. [subscription required]

Get $2 a Word at Real Simple

O: The Oprah Magazine and More may target a similar demo, but no other pub can compare directly with Real Simple‘s content. With over 2 million readers, articles cater to women from their 20s to their 60s. “We cast a pretty wide net in terms of the areas that we cover, so each one of our beats could theoretically compete with a different magazine,” said deputy editor Noelle Howey, “and we also try to pitch as much of our content as possible to as broad a range of readers as possible.”

Therefore, your best bet is to make sure your pitch has an element of universality, while keeping in mind the pub’s editorial direction. “‘Real Simple’ is the defining characteristic of the magazine,” explained Howey. “We are a service magazine presenting solutions, and the idea is to take complicated concepts and simplify them for the reader.”

For more info, read How To Pitch: Real Simple. [subscription required]

How to Set Your Freelance Writing Rates

Being a freelancer comes with many perks: working from home, flexible hours and the ability to pick your own projects. But it can be difficult to figure out how much your work is worth. Should you have an hourly rate or a per-project one? New writers might want to accept a lower rate to build clips, but how do you know when a rate is too low? Is the project even worth your time?

In the latest Mediabistro feature, seasoned freelancers share their experiences, so you can learn from their mistakes and maximize the value of your work.

Freelancer Aubre Andrus says she set a salary goal for herself and calculates her hourly rate from there. For her, the fact that she isn’t working on income-generating tasks 40 hours a week was a determining factor.

“This rate helps me devise my per-project fee and helps me decide if a project is worth my time,” explained Andrus. That, along with tracking her monthly earnings, has helped her stay on target to attain her salary goal.

Read more in 4 Things to Consider When Setting Your Freelance Writing Rate. [subscription required]

This Mag is Looking for Food Writers

If you have some professional cooking experience, or a lot of food writing experience, Plate is looking for your take on grub. This trade magazine boasts a readership of professional chefs and highly educated foodies, but its glossy photos make it look like newsstand fare rather than your typical trade pub.

“We make sure to talk to industry leaders and up-and-coming chefs around the country, and make their exchange of information the focus of the magazine,” said editor Chandra Ram. “You won’t find holiday cooking or dining information here; you will find timely, fun and exciting food discussion by people who are passionate about food.”

For more information on what to pitch, read How To Pitch: Plate.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is an exclusive feature for Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Freelancers Needed at This Bitchin’ Pub

Bitch provides its readers “a feminist response to pop culture,” and with such an eye-catching, jaw-dropping title, its content is nothing short of edgy.

“We rely on freelancers to pitch us,” editor-in-chief Kjerstin Johnson said. “If we generate an idea in house, we may send a query to a group of established freelancers,” but she emphasizes that the Bitch team is hungry for solid stories with new angles.

Without any staff writers to fill the gaps, freelancers generate almost all of the magazine’s content — including features, which are anything from analytical essays on the power of style to author Q&As, running 2,000-4,000 words.

For more guidelines and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Bitch.

Andrea Hackett

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several Mediabistro features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops and more.

Freelancers Needed at This Bitchin’ Pub

Bitch provides its readers “a feminist response to pop culture,” and with such an eye-catching, jaw-dropping title, its content is nothing short of edgy.

“We rely on freelancers to pitch us,” editor-in-chief Kjerstin Johnson said. “If we generate an idea in house, we may send a query to a group of established freelancers,” but she emphasizes that the Bitch team is hungry for solid stories with new angles.

Without any staff writers to fill the gaps, freelancers generate almost all of the magazine’s content — including features, which are anything from analytical essays on the power of style to author Q&As, running 2,000-4,000 words.

For more guidelines and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Bitch.

Andrea Hackett

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several Mediabistro features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops and more.

NEXT PAGE >>