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Posts Tagged ‘Marc Graser’

Rotten Tomatoes Expansion Into TV Gets Quick, Bad Review

That didn’t take long. A few hours after Variety‘s Marc Graser tipped the first big change at rottentomatoes.com since the site launched in 1998, Atlantic Wire fellow Esther Zuckerman has given the expansion a thumbs down.

Launching Tuesday, RT’s TV Zone will rate TV series using the same scale that is employed for movies. With one big difference – TV ratings will be tied to full seasons rather than single episodes. Writes Zuckerman:

TV criticism isn’t the same as movie criticism. Whereas movie criticism is fairly finite — a critic states his or her case and it’s done — television criticism has to account for the fact that shows can vary wildly over the course of their seasons. Note, for instance, how initially critics weren’t too thrilled by Mad Men or Breaking Bad at the shows’ outsets…

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Xbox Users Set to Play with a Unique Awards Show Component – ‘Samuel L. Jackson Mode’

The king of U.S. reality TV, Mark Burnett, has added a royale-with-cheese-like element to tonight’s live broadcast on Spike TV of the 10th anniversary edition of the Video Game Awards (6 p.m. PT/9 p.m. ET). Per an article in Variety by Marc Graser:

Through Xbox Live, viewers will choose which weapons from various video games that host Samuel L.Jackson will appear with onstage, or the video games they want to see him integrated into via what’s being dubbed “Sam Jackson Mode.”

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Mike Fleming Curses Out Variety Ben Affleck Item

The highly competitive rivalry between Deadline’s Mike Fleming and the film reporting crew at Variety has taken a contentious new turn. Reacting on Wednesday to a variety.com item by Jeff Sneider and Justin Kroll (with help from Marc Graser) about Warner Bros.’ pursuit of Ben Affleck as a possible director for a Justice League movie, Fleming lost it:

I’ve been reading a lot of stuff lately that has been of questionable substance, and I’m calling bullshit on this big Variety scoop today that implies Warner Bros. will get Ben Affleck as director of its Justice League film. This is a story I checked out days ago, and didn’t run when Affleck’s reps stated that it was not going to happen with him…

Just because the studio wants Affleck doesn’t mean he will do the movie, and several sources tell me he might take a meeting, but that’s it.

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Variety’s Boffo Internship Program Mints Another Full-Timer

Today is the first day on the TV beat job at Variety for AJ Marechal (pictured). She was an intern last year with the Hollywood trade from March through November.

Marechal’s salaried return continues a rather remarkable string of success for the program instituted in 1995 by current managing editor Kirstin Wilder. “During my college days, I interned at the St. Petersburg Times in South Florida and the News & Observer in Raleigh,” Wilder tells FishbowlLA. “I learned first-hand how important these opportunities can be and was determined when I came to Variety to put an internship program in place.”

From the get-go, Wilder insisted that the trade’s internship program be a paid one. The list of people who’ve jumped from intern to staffer at Variety over the years is long and impressive. Marechal joins a current group of internship-program grads that consists of chief film critic Justin Chang, music editor Andrew Barker, senior writer Marc Graser, graphic designer Dan Doperalski and film reporters Andrew Stewart, Jeff Sneider, Justin Kroll and Rachel Abrams.

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Blockbuster to Bring Back Late Fees, Stock Tanking

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Lets see how we can sanitize this story to make it more family friendly: Blockbuster, giant video rental mega-corporation that ruthlessly charged equally giant late-fees for decades is slipping quickly into that final goodnight after not being able to compete with Netflix.

Marc Graser at Variety reports:

The Dallas-based company has been closing stores as more consumers switch to online rental services and kiosks. Blockbuster lost $435 million in the fourth quarter.

As a result, Moodys lowered Blockbuster from “Caa1″ to “Caa3,” two notches into junk status.

Move comes as Blockbuster is bringing back late fees. It will charge $1 for up to 10 days for late returns, capping the fees at $10 on $4.99 new releases. It is also limiting the time for those rentals to five days from the previous seven-day range.

Blockbusted.