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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Miller’

Mark Miller Resigns from The Hollywood Reporter

MarkMillerTwitterProfilePicA year and a half after joining the surging Hollywood concern as deputy editorial director, former Newsweek-Daily Beast staffer Mark Miller has decided it’s time to move on. At press time, it’s unclear whether Miller is transitioning to another job or taking a break.

Here’s the memo sent out today by Janice Min:

Dear Staff -

I know Mark announced his resignation in the edit meeting this morning, but with so many of us traveling today, I wanted to drop a quick note to make sure everyone on staff was aware.

In the coming days and weeks, [executive managing editor] Sudie [Redmond] and I will work to ensure all his duties and responsibilities are well-covered and cared for.

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Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Mitchell Scherzer Named Trustee of Hearst Family Trust

Mitchell Scherzer GMitchell Scherzer, currently senior vice president and chief financial officer of Hearst Corporation, has been elected a trustee of the Hearst Family Trust. The trustees have a variety of duties, including electing the corporation’s board of directors.

The trustees of the the Hearst Family Trust now include Scherzer, James Asher, David Barrett, Anissa Balson, Frank Bennack, John Conomikes, Lisa Hearst Hagerman, George Hearst III, William Hearst III, Gilbert Maurer, Mark Miller, Virginia Hearst Randt and Steven Swartz.

The Hearst Family Trust, established under the will of William Randolph Hearst, owns Hearst Corporation.

Shirley Halperin, Music Editor of THR, on Landing an Interview with Bieber

ShirleyHalperinShirley Halperin has seen it all. She’s been covering music since the mid-90s and has worked everywhere from US Weekly to The Los Angeles Times to where she is now, the sole music staffer for The Hollywood Reporter.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Halerpin talks about the difficulties of getting Justin Bieber to sit down for an interview, his changing physical appearance, and the importance of getting his story just right:

The one challenging thing about writing this piece is that there were so many different ways into it. There were literally six or seven completely different ledes, angles, focuses that I could have done. It was really coming up with the one that was most relevant for right now — that also appealed to [Janice Min, editorial director of THR] and our deputy editorial director, Mark Miller, and was also a really interesting read, [one] that felt exciting. But there were so many different ways to do that.

To read more about Halperin’s ascent from intern at High Times to music expert at THR, read: So What Do You Do, Shirley Halperin, Music Editor For The Hollywood Reporter?

 

Hollywood Reporter Bolsters Marketing, Editorial Departments

It feels a little bit this week like the inauguration of Janice Min’s second two-year term. Having re-branded and relaunched a struggling Hollywood trade publication as a consumer weekly magazine and website, Min is seemingly gearing up for the next big operational step forward towards (hopefully) break-even.

On Tuesday, THR announced the appointment of a VP of marketing, Anna Magzanyan. She was previously with Clear Channel, where she handled iHeartRadio, and the LA Times Media Group. Today, the first of several waves of editorial hires is being heralded.

The biggest and in some ways most surprising move is that news editor Matthew Belloni (pictured) has been promoted to the same post as Owen Phillips. The two will share the title of executive editor and work alongside a group that now includes deputy editorial director  Mark Miller. He reports directly to Min and comes over from the downsizing Daily Beast/Newsweek. Alison Brower, most recently the interim editor-in-chief of Seventeen, has been appointed THR special projects editor.

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Mark Miller Leaves Newsweek/The Daily Beast for The Hollywood Reporter

Mark Miller is — once again — leaving Newsweek. The New York Post reports that Miller, who returned to Newsweek/The Daily Beast in 2011 after leaving it in 2010, is departing to join The Hollywood Reporter as its deputy editorial director.

At THR, Miller will report to editorial director, Janice Min.

“He [Miller]  has significant digital and print experience and has experience juggling both sides of a chaotic operation,” Min told the Post.

The Up and Down World of Newsweek

If we had a dollar for each time we read something good about Newsweek, we’d have about $15. However, if we had a dollar for each time we read something bad about the magazine, we’d have enough money to tolerate Plunge at the Gansevoort. Despite the plethora of bad reports about Newsweek since Tina Brown took over, each is typically sprinkled with some good. This is the world of Newsweek: Up and down all the time.

Here are the good and bad takeaways from WWD’s piece about Newsweek today.

Good:

  • There are people complaining, but it’s not as bad as everyone thinks. Newsweek’s International Editor, Tunku Varadarajan, said, “Yes, there are disgruntled people, but there are many, many, many more who are not disgruntled.”
  • People are actually coming back, including Mark Miller and Dan Klaidman.
  • Newsstand sales are up six percent compared to last year.

Bad:

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Tom Brokaw, Vernon Jordan and the Shy Divorcee

1003_mockup.gifIt was SRO at Michael’s today. The dining room was so jam packed every sqaure inch was occupied by a mogul (Mel Karmazin!), media heavyweight (Tom Brokaw, Jon Meacham, Jeff Zucker), or social swan (divorcee of the moment, Mercedes Bass who moved to the Garden Room with pal Lynn Nesbitt when the decibel level and fabulousness of it all got to be too much).  Just a thought: if you’re looking for a quiet, out of the way lunch spot, you might want to consider going somewhere else on Wednesday.

I was joined today by Forbes‘ new editor, Randall Lane. In his new position, Randall is presiding over familiar territory to him: the lives of the ridiculously rich and ambitious. In a previous life, he was the editor of Trader Monthly which chronicled the age of excess of the Wall Streeter of days gone by.  That experience later provided plenty of fodder for his book, The Zeroes: My Misadventures in the Decade When Wall Street Went Insane. In the interim, he’s been an editor at large for Newsweek and written for The Daily Beast. Having worked with him years ago when he was the editor in chief on the startup Justice, which covered the hot trials and legal issues of the day, I was thrilled when I heard he’d gotten the top job at Forbes back in September.

Randall first worked at Forbes fresh out of college in the nineties and spent six years “chasing rich people” and working on the franchise’s venerated power lists which required (and still do) hundreds of hours of research and manpower. “In some ways, it feels like I never left,” he tells me.

Diane Clehane and Randall Lane
Randall Lane and yours truly

Since taking the helm, Randall has been on a mission to make the book more visually exciting with interesting photography (the arresting cover image of Bill Gates in the “World’s 70 Most Powerful People” issue is a winner), fresh design elements courtesy of the Brooklyn-based shop Athletics, a livelier front of book section and more in-depth profiles on people the Forbes reader wants to know about.  Exhibit A: The cover story in the November 7 issue on Dropbox’s Drew Houston, the 28 year-old mogul who turned down Steve Jobs and is now worth $600 million which drew one million hits on Forbes.com.

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Newsweek/The Daily Beast Makes Miller Official

(Via The Texas Tribune)

Among the upheaval at Newsweek/The Daily Beast yesterday, it was rumored that Mark Miller, a one time veteran of the magazine, was going to return. That rumor is now fact. Adweek reports that Miller is returning to the magazine, taking the place of Edward Felsenthal as the Director of Editorial Operations. Much like Felsenthal did while he was there, Miller will be the right hand man to Tina Brown.

Miller worked for Newsweek from 1985 until last year, when he left and became Editor-in-Chief at The Texas Tribune. Here is a snippet from one of the paper’s blogs, announcing the news that Miller was leaving:

Mark did yeoman’s work — that was evident to us from day one, and apparently not only to us, because many of his old compatriots in New York spent the better part of the last year trying to lure him back. Finally one did: Tina Brown, who merged her Daily Beast website with the remnants of Newsweek not long after Mark exited the building. She recently offered him, and he accepted, the chance to be the director of editorial operations for ‘NewsBeast,’ as the combined entity is jokingly known. Turns out he missed the big city. Tina’s gain, our loss. Yours, too.

Newsweek/The Daily Beast Ousts Publisher Ray Chelstowski

Ray Chelstowski, Publisher of Newsweek/The Daily Beast, has been shown the door. According to the Wall Street Journal, Chelstowksi, who had been with the company for only about 10 months, was let go because of poor ad sales. Through the November 7 issue of Newsweek, ad pages were down 21 percent compared to last year.

Eric Danetz, who had most recently worked at CBS as Vice President of Interactive Sales, is taking over Chelstowski’s spot.

The change is effective immediately.

UPDATE:
The New York Times is reporting that Managing Editor Tom Weber is out as well. Weber has resigned and won’t be replaced.

UPDATE TWO:
Jeremy Peters of the Times tweeted that Newsweeks’s Executive Editor, Edward Felsenthal, has resigned. Mark Miller is rumored to be replacing Felsenthal.

Texas Tribune Names Mark Milller As Editor

Non-profit media organization The Texas Tribune today announced Mark Miller as its editor beginning this December. In this newly created position, Miller will oversee the Tribune’s day-to-day editorial operations.

Miller has previously served as the editorial director of Newsweek and editor of Newsweek Digital. He had been with the Newsweek brand since 1985, when he started as a summer intern in its Washington bureau. He has also worked as an assistant managing editor at the Dallas Morning News and enjoyed a stint at ABC News.

During his years at Newsweek, Miller has worked as a Washington correspondent; reported on the weekly’s culture, lifestyle and society sections; has acted as its National Correspondent; served as the magazine’s Los Angeles Bureau Chief, West Coast Editor, senior editor for News Development and chief of correspondents; and worked as a political correspondent covering the 1992 presidential campaign.

He is the recipient of  several awards, including the National Magazine Award.