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Posts Tagged ‘MediaWeek’

Brandweek, Mediaweek Prepare to Fold Into Adweek

We mentioned this back in February, and now it appears to be happening: Brandweek and Mediaweek published their final print versions today, and will be folded into Adweek starting next week.

On both of the magazine’s sites, the following statement appears:

In the upcoming weeks, Brandweek.com [or Mediaweek] will become part of the new, completely redesigned Adweek.com. You’ll still get the brand marketing news you seek out here, but in an enhanced site with an unmatched user experience. Look forward to exclusive content, more video and new interactivity – coming soon!

Despite that exclamation point, Media Decoder says the changes will sadly bring some layoffs.

A moment of silence for the fallen trade pubs, please.

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Richard Beckman Denies Sale of Prometheus

Early today The New York Post ran with a rumor about Prometheus Global Media – the company that publishes Brandweek, Mediaweek, Adweek, The Hollywood Reporter and others – being sold.

The report stated that the investors behind Prometheus were looking for a 50 percent premium on the initial price paid for the company. As with any rumor, there were conflicting views, as a spokesperson for the investing company told the Post that the company is not being sold.

Now, Richard Beckman, CEO of Prometheus, has spoken up on the issue via a company-wide memo, which was obtained by The Cutline.  Not only does Beckman deny the sale, he states that it is looking to expand.

It’s wise to view anything Beckman says with a bit of skepticism. The guy’s nickname is Mad Dog, and as we can all remember from college, things named Mad Dog shouldn’t be trusted.

Print Editions of Mediaweek and Brandweek Might End in April

Keith Kelly, in a report about Adweek revamping its Hot List feature, cites a blog post media watcher Tony Case that says Mediaweek and Brandweek will stop print production in April. Case also says that Adweek will be launching a redesign of their website then, in part to respond to the new look Ad Age site.

But the big news – if Case is correct – is that print issues of Brandweek and Mediaweek are on their way out. We’ve been expecting this to happen since both magazines lost staffers and operated under one team overseen by the polarizing Michael Wolff. You could also argue that the magazines seemed to overlap coverage a lot, but still, each time print disappears, a journalist loses his wings.

Or something like that.

Five Magazine Publishers Plan To Launch Ad Campaign Next Month

magazines newsstand.jpgCondé Nast, Hearst Corp., Meredith Corp., Time Inc. and Wenner Media are working together to fund and launch a magazine marketing campaign starting next month, Mediaweek reports.

More details about the campaign, which will promote the magazine medium, will be introduced next month, with the publishers featuring ads in their titles starting in April.

Meredith’s Jack Griffin told Mediaweek:

“The message is this: Industry leaders are joining forces to solve problems. I think it’s an opportunity to speak up at a time when the media landscape has gotten very confusing, and I think the campaign asserts the intrinsic value of the magazine medium.”

This agreement is different from the magazine consortium between four of those publishers and News Corp., Next Issue Media, which have combined forces to launch some sort of digital e-reader format.

Read more: Magazine Marketing Pact to Roll Out in April

Previously: New Publisher Consortium Gets A Name

“Reverse Publishing” Gains Traction at Meredith, Hearst

mixing_bowl.jpgReverse publishing, or the act of taking a Web property and turning it into a print publication, may seem counter-intuitive considering the past couple of years the industry’s had.

But Meredith Corp. and Hearst Publications both weathered the recession and drop in ad sales fairly well, and therefore make some of the best candidates for the experiment. According to MediaWeek, Hearst will be publishing a “bookazine” called Light & Delish, based on recipes from their foodie Web site Delish.com. Meanwhile, Meredith just released its second MixingBowl.com print magazine last week.

But with the relatively low costs of putting something online versus putting it in print (and considering that neither of these publications are relying heavily on advertisers, but are consumer-driven and crowdsourced), what’s the point of putting these food projects to print? Says Light & Delish project editor Susan Schulz:

“It’s a way to repackage content in a way that’s meaningful to the reader…We’re sitting on such great content. We’ve found success and repurposing it on the Web, and there are other ways to repurpose it. We’re always looking for revenue streams — and low-cost revenue streams.”

So before you submit your next recipe to your favorite cooking site remember: it just might end up as an ad-hoc profit-maker for a media company.

Read More: Hearst, Meredith Try Web-to-Print TitlesMediaweek

Condé Nast’s Dead Titles May See New Life In Licensing Deals

gourmet2.jpgWhether its digital versions of its magazines or partnerships with e-commerce sites it’s clear Condé Nast is on the hunt for new sources of revenue.

Today’s report in Mediaweek adds that Condé may be taking it one step further in seeking a new life for its now-defunct titles, Cookie, Domino and Gourmet, in the form of things like branded kitchen appliances. In this respect, execs have been reportedly telling staffers to look to rival publisher Meredith Corp. for inspiration; the Midwestern company has been pumping out Better Homes & Gardens-branded products for years.

But, of course, don’t expect any products connected to Condé Nast brands to cheapen its namesake –that’s a fear Si Newhouse has always had, which has kept the publisher out of licensing deals before. Thoughtfully chosen, high-end partnerships are probably where this company will end up, much like last month’s tie-in with Vogue and e-commerce site Gilt Groupe. But even if Condé can squeeze some money out of its dead titles’ brand names, those products can’t make up for the magazines we miss so much.

Condé Nast’s Cultural ShiftMediaweek

Previously: Conde Keeps Gourmet Alive In App Form

Nielsen President Farrar Steps Down

farrar.gifAfter working to complete the sale of eight brands last month, Nielsen Business Media president Greg Farrar has decided to leave the company, Folio reported last night.

Farrar, who had worked at the company for 20 years, was named president in 2007, and had served as COO before that. He helped oversee the sale of several brands, including Mediaweek and Billboard to newly created e5 Global Media in December.

Nielsen told Folio that is has no plans to replace Farrar, although he will stay on for a transition period, overseeing the company’s remaining publications that are not associated with a trade show. Andy Bilbao, senior vice president of brand media, will then take over those duties once Farrar departs, with senior vice presidents Joe Randall and David Loechner have been picked to lead the newly-created Nielsen Expositions group for the company’s trade shows.

Update: A Nielsen spokesperson tells FishbowlNY: “Having managed the trade show business through the economic downturn while also divesting most of the company’s publications, Greg has accomplished his goals at Nielsen and decided it is the right time to seek greater opportunities.”

Farrar Leaving Nielsen Business Media as PresidentFolio

Previously: Investor Group Buys Eight Nielsen Brands

People Union Employees Win Arbitration Over Web Writing

peoplecover.jpgA group of People magazine writers represented by the Newspaper Guild of New York have won an arbitration ruling upholding a 2007 agreement with Time Inc. that allowed all writing for magazine Web sites to be voluntary, Mediaweek reported yesterday.

According to the report, the 2007 agreement between the guild and the magazine publisher said writers would not be forced to write for sites like People.com, and if they did their workload would be “adjusted accordingly.” People writers in the Los Angeles bureau felt their superiors were in violation of the agreement, and arbitrators agreed, although they did not award back pay to the writers who put in extra time on the site.

It seems silly, at a time when print and online coverage seem like one and the same for so many magazines and newspapers, to argue over whether writing for the Web is part of what a writer is getting paid to do. But we applaud the guild for standing up for writers’ rights to get paid for the work they put in, because so many writers today are paid so little (especially when they work on the Web) but go above and beyond without even thinking of asking for additional wages.

People.com Guild Employees Claim Win in Labor CaseMediaweek

Related: Pay The Writer? Now With This Technology!

Former FishbowlLA Editor Joins NYMag.com As West Coast Editor

NYMagVultureLogo.jpgAs part of its expanding entertainment coverage, NYMag.com has hired its first West Coast editor.

The New York magazine site announced yesterday that Claude Brodesser-Akner, a media and entertainment reporting veteran, would be joining the team of its Vulture blog. Brodesser-Akner has been covering the industry since 1996, working for Mediaweek and Variety, editing our sister site FishbowlLA and creating the weekly public radio show “The Business.” He also helped launch TMZ.com and served as the Los Angeles bureau chief for Advertising Age. He was most recently a contributor for Wired.

This latest hire is part of NYMag.com’s plans to expand its entertainment and culture coverage, led by former Entertainment Weekly editor Josh Wolk, who joined the site in November.

Previously: Entertainment Weekly Editor Joins NYMag.com

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Breaking: Beckman Leaves Condé Nast

beckman.jpgIt’s official: Richard Beckman, chief executive of Women’s Wear Daily publisher Fairchild Fashion Group resigned this morning. He is leaving the Condé Nast division to become CEO of e5 Global Media, a recently created media company that purchased The Hollywood Reporter, Billboard, MediaWeek and AdWeek from Nielsen last month, in a move first reported by The New York Post.

Beckman moved from his position as president of the Condé Nast Media Group to Fairchild last March, a move that was seen by many in the industry as a demotion. Condé Nast has yet to name a replacement.

Update: The Hollywood Reporter writes today about the new CEO of its parent company: “Beckman said his career and passion have focused on music, entertainment and media, ‘making this collection of brands particularly alluring to me.’ He added: ‘I look forward to developing these valuable brands and improving and extending them in the years to come.’”

Read more: Beckman Resigns as Fairchild CEOWWD

Conde rainmaker Richard Beckman eyes exitNew York Post

Previously: Richard Beckman Named President, CEO of Fairchild, Investor Group Buys Eight Nielsen Brands

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