TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘MediaWeek’

Condé Nast Plans Men’s Wear Trade

dnr cover.jpgAs we mentioned last week, on New Year’s Eve Mediaweek reported on rumors that Condé Nast‘s Fairchild Fashion Group, which publishes Women’s Wear Daily, is working on a trade publication that will focus on the men’s wear market.

This report adds intel that the publication is set to launch in June, and it will be led by WWD‘s editor Ed Nardoza and publisher Marc Berger, the former Men’s Vogue publisher who was brought on as publisher of Footwear News, another Fairchild trade pub, in June.

Mediaweek was also unclear how the new magazine would differ from DNR, which Condé folded into WWD just over a year ago. If it turns out to be a weekly, the new pub will likely be the same as the shuttered 115-year-old trade magazine, but if it turns out to be a monthly, it will look more like Menswear, DNR‘s sister pub that also closed up shop in 2008.

Read more: Condé Nast to Launch Fashion Trade PubMediaweek

Previously: Year-end Condé Nast News

Investor Group Buys Eight Nielsen Brands Including Hollywood Reporter, Billboard

THR.jpgAfter weeks of speculation over the deal, an investor group formed by media private equity partnership Pluribus Capital Management and financial services company Guggenheim Partners just announced that it has purchased eight brands from The Nielsen Co., including the pubs The Hollywood Reporter, Billboard, Mediaweek, Adweek and Brandweek.

The new company, called e5 Global Media LLC, is said to have paid $70 million for the publications and events, which include the ShoWest and other trade shows. Pluribus was founded by James A. Finkelstein, whose family owns the “Who’s Who” series of books; George Green, the former president of Hearst Magazines International; and Matthew Doull. The New York Post‘s Keith Kelly reported today that another rumored partner in the deal, Rupert’s son Lachlan Murdoch, was replaced by former Bear Stearns chief Alan Schwartz, who runs Guggenheim. Finkelstein will serve as chairman of e5, the company said.

Meanwhile, Nielsen maintains that it will remain committed to its remaining brands. “Divesting these titles allows Nielsen to focus its investment on its core businesses and those parts of our portfolio that have the greatest potential for growth, including our leading trade show group,” Nielsen Business Media president Greg Farrar said.

Full release, after the jump

Billboard buying group changesNew York Post

Read more

Business Journals’ Readership Up, Despite Cutbacks

fortune_20magazine_20cover.jpg

You’d never know it from the cuts across the board being made at publishers like Time Inc. and Forbes Media, but some of these companies’ titles are seeing a upswing in their readership. Lucia Moses of MediaWeek reported this week that Fortune, The Economist, Smart Money, The Wall Street Journal, Inc. and Forbes have all seen an increase in readers, ironically because of all the financial terror that has caused their publishers to make cuts in the first place.

So while audiences bemoan Rupert Murdoch‘s pay wall plans, following The Wall Street Journal model, the paper itself has seen an 11.6 percent growth in overall readership from last year. And while Fortune may be cutting as many as 40 staffers over the next several weeks as part of Time Inc.’s reduction plan and Forbes let go 100 employees just last month, the two magazines have grown to 4.1 million (9 percent increase) and 6 million (11.5 percent) in total readers, respectively. And with the current trend seeing unemployment still on the rise among executives, you can bet one place they won’t be cutting back: their subscriptions to business magazines. Maybe next year’s jump in readers will be big enough that these titles can actually hire back some of their emaciated newsroom.

Read More: Report: Business Magazines See Uptick in Readership

Previously: First on FBNY: Time Inc. Shutters Custom Pub Fortune Small Business, Forbes Layoffs Decimate Staff, Time Inc. Closes Door on Buyouts Today, WSJ Looks To Claim Title Of Number One Paper In Circulation

Nielsen Pubs Sold?

mediaweek cover.jpgSharon Waxman reports on The Wrap that Nielsen is set to sell a number of its magazines, including Mediaweek, The Hollywood Reporter, Billboard, Adweek and Brandweek.

The reported buyer of this slew of trade pubs is James Finkelstein‘s News Communications Inc., which owns the Who’s Who books and Washington, D.C. pub The Hill.

As all media companies have struggled recently, it’s been a particularly difficult year for business-to-business trade publishers, with many, including Nielsen, folding publications and some even filing for bankruptcy. And as Waxman reports about Nielsen’s pubs:

“Individuals knowledgeable about the state of the trades said that all of Nielsen’s entertainment titles were suffering. ‘Billboard is doing so-so, Adweek is not doing well at all, and THR is not great,’ said this former senior Nielsen executive. ‘The B-to-B market has just collapsed.’”

But will this sale mark the end of these publications lives? Or will it give them a hope at survival?

Hollywood Reporter Set to be Sold to ‘Who’s Who’s’ Finkelstein –The Wrap

Related: Nielsen Folds Radio & Records

eMedia Vitals Launches with Party At Social Bar

emediavitals.jpg
eMedia Vitals is not your normal aggregation site. Instead, it lends its arms out to publishers and content producers as well. While most aggregators are content to just piggy-back on other people’s content and get whatever pageviews or ad sales are to be found out there, eMedia working with them to create revenue for their product.

Last night, the new media company held a launch party at New York’s social bar. Pictures after the jump.

Read more

FCC Appoints WSJ Contributor Waldman New Media Advisor

153346689_3823fcad42.jpg The FCC has named Steven Waldman as an adviser to the chairman in its office of strategic planning. According to MediaWeek, Waldman will “lead an open, fact-finding process to study the impact of technology and a weakened economy on the future of media, and make policy recommendations.”

If these policy recommendations have anything to do with the FCC’s recent proposed Net Neutrality Principles outlined by FCC chairman Julius Genachowski last month, Waldman’s past job experience puts him in a good position to weigh both sides of the argument for new Internet regulations.

Read more

Sales Team Moves At Bonnier, MSLO

Balis-b1.jpgThere’s news of two moves among sales teams at magazine publishers Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia and Bonnier Corp.

MediaDailyNews reports that MSLO has brought on Janet Balis (left) as executive vice president of media sales and marketing. She will oversee sales across the publishing, broadcast and digital properties and will report to MSLO’s executive chair Charles Koppelman. Balis joins MSLO from her own consutling company Digital Media Strategies, where she has worked for the past year and half. She also previously worked for Time Warner, where she served in positions at Time.com, People.com and AOL.

Over at Bonnier, Chris Allen, VP of group publishing and corporate sales for nine of the company’s travel, shelter and lifestyle titles, is departing after less than a month on the job, Mediaweek reported. Allen was hired to serve in one of two group publishing roles created by Bonnier when it acquired five titles from Hachette Filipacchi last month.

Mediaweek said Allen, who had previously served as publisher for Cooking Light, is leaving without another job lined up.

“It was more of a three- to four-week consulting trial,” Allen told Mediaweek. “I just think the nature of the job to be done on the particular titles was not what I expected it to be. I think I thought it was a larger, more strategic task than it was.”

Photo via MediaDailyNews

Parenting Magazine Ups Rate Base

parenting.pngEarlier this year, Bonnier Corp. split its Parenting magazine into two different editions based on the ages of its readers’ children, creating Parenting School Years and Parenting Early Years. Now, the company has announced that the rate base of Parenting School Years will increase by 10 percent next year, bringing it up to 550,000 from the 500,000.

This is Parenting‘s first rate base increase since 2001, and brings the total combined rate base for both editions to 2.2 million. According to the company, average sub price and paid circulation have been rising since the introduction of the new editions, and the magazine now has the highest number of paid subscribers in the parenting category. What’s more, the upcoming September issues are the biggest issues ever for the new editions, the company said.

However, the news comes as a Mediaweek article revealed that the split didn’t pay off the way Bonnier expected.

“This year through July/August, the [parenting] category declined 11 percent in ad pages, per the Mediaweek Monitor. But Parenting Early Years‘ pages fell 26 percent to 435 through August,” the article said. For September, Early Years will have 97 ad pages, while School Years will have 83, Bonnier said.

Still, increasing the rate base of Parenting School Years shows commitment to the new model. The rate base increase will go into effect with the February 2010 issue. School Years, which was previously only available through subscriptions, will also go on sale at newsstands starting with the September issue.

“60 Minutes” Interview With Anna Wintour A Snore|Valleywag Editor Says Goodbye|Shakeup At Adweek|More Nontraditional Media Seek Fellowships|10 Reasons Why Papers Are Important


Watch CBS Videos Online

UnBeige: “60 Minutes” scored an interview with Vogue editrix Anna Wintour last night, but the results were about as surprising as an Andy Rooney monologue.

BayNewser: As Valleywag editor Owen Thomas prepared to leave his post for a new spot at NBC, he wrote a heart-felt letter to his successor, Ryan Tate.

Folio: There’s been shakeup at Adweek Media, publishers of Adweek, Mediaweek and Brandweek.

New York Times: Newspaper employees no longer dominate fellowships.

Boston.com: 10 funny reasons why the Internet can’t replace newspapers.

EW.com, WSJ.com Take Top Prizes At EPpy Awards

eppy.pngEditor & Publisher and Mediaweek presented their 14th consecutive EPpy Awards today in at the Interactive Newspaper Conference and Trade Show in New Orleans, honoring “the best Web sites in the media world.”

The beleaguered Boston Globe, The Las Vegas Sun, CNN and ESPN all took home two awards each. The Globe, which was a finalist for five awards, was awarded Best Sports Blog, for sportswriter Tony Massarotti‘s blog “Mazz,” and two Boston.com sites, Boston.com/ThingsToDo and and Boston.com/ae (Arts & Entertainment) tied for Best Entertainment Web site (with more than one million unique monthly visitors).

The Sun won in the Best Newspaper-Affiliated Web site with fewer than one million unique monthly visitors and Best Web Special Feature — News or Event with fewer than one million unique monthly visitors categories.

But the big prize for Best Newspaper-Affiliated Web site with more than one million unique monthly visitors went to The Wall Street Journal‘s site, WSJ.com. And another New York-based pub, Entertainment Weekly, nabbed the award for Best National Magazine-Affiliated Web site.

A full list of winners after the jump

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>