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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Calderone’

Ana Marie Cox Named GQ D.C. Correspondent

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Congrats to Ana Marie Cox, who has had no trouble finding a new job after her gig as correspondent at Air America expired when the media company shuttered in late January. The frequent Rachel Maddow guest (and substitute host) will be putting her prolific knowledge of the D.C. scene to good use as the new Washington correspondent for G.Q., helping shape the magazine’s D.C. Power List to be “less like a best-dressed list, and more like a Billboard 100,” as she told Politico‘s Michael Calderone this morning. This will be Cox’s first time working at a monthly magazine, though before the Condé Nast title she was Time.Com‘s Washington editor. Cox is perhaps most famous for founding the D.C. political snark blog, Wonkette.

Read More: Ana Marie Cox joins GQ

On The Menu: Politico’s Calderone Talks About Terrorism Coverage

mmm_2-3.gifToday, Politico.com staff writer Michael Calderone joined hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu to discuss the media’s recent coverage of terrorism.

Calderone discussed his coverage through Christmas of the attempted terrorism attack in Detroit and his blog post yesterday about The New York Times Magazine‘s decision to print its recent story on terrorism online two weeks before its scheduled print date.

“This is actually the longest stretch of time that the paper has ever published a magazine story online that’s going to end up in print. It’s still not going to be in the print edition for two more weeks,” he explained. “It shows something about how the Times thought that there was such an urgency to this story. And it also raises questions about the newspaper industry and whether you can sit on great material for a couple weeks or do you have to get it online as fast as possible.”

Also discussed: political memoirs to watch out for in 2010, including Karl Rove‘s upcoming book and what Calderone will be covering during the coming year.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

New York Times Magazine Publishes Story Online Two Weeks Early

nytmagazine.jpgFor the first time ever, The New York Times has posted a story that’s set to run in its Sunday magazine two weeks before the publication date. The lengthy feature, written by Peter Baker, focuses on the Obama administration’s work combating terrorism, a topic that has particular relevance in the face of the failed attack on Christmas Day.

When publications like the Times magazine have newsy content, it’s hard for them to sit on them until the scheduled publication date. As a result, they can choose to publish part or all of their articles online prior to print publication — and risk alienating their print readers. But the decision to publish the story two weeks early will most likely not deter readers from picking up a Sunday Times on January 17; it is, after all, only one story in the paper, and the Times always publishes its stories online at least a few hours before the print version is available, if not a few days early in the case of many recent Sunday magazine pieces.

The Times‘ deputy magazine editor Megan Liberman told Politico‘s Michael Calderone that publishing those magazine stories early “doesn’t dampen interest” in the content before the weekend. What’s more, Liberman added that the story itself could change between now and its eventual print date if more terrorism-related news emerges before its Friday close. It was the “urgency” of this particular story that warranted the early, unprecedented, online publishing of this piece.

The difference between magazine stories online and in print are vast. Long-form pieces are sometimes easier to read as a hard copy, and the relationship between the art and the words in a magazine article creates an experience that can’t be duplicated with columns of digital text. So, although this story will be read countless times before its print version ever reaches readers’ hands, there’s still a case for reading it (again) in that format.

Do you agree?

Read more: Inside Obama’s War on TerrorismNew York Times Magazine

NYT pushes mag story up two weeks; editor says ‘urgency set in’ –Politico

Times-Journal Feud Update: Brauchli Weighs In

nytwsj.jpgYesterday, as New York Times executive editor Bill Keller sent a comment to The New York Observer, continuing the spat between the Times and The Wall Street Journal, former Journal editor Marcus Brauchli was offering his take on the year-old dust up to Politico.

“I have to say I wondered, since when do newspaper editors take it upon themselves to correct what they in their righteousness perceive as factual errors in other peoples’ press releases? That must keep them very busy,” Brauchli told Michael Calderone about his thoughts last year upon hearing that Keller had written to the George Polk Awards committee to complain about a press release that mentioned the Journal.

Of course, Brauchli wasn’t too busy to write a letter of his own to the award committee, defending his paper’s work against Keller’s griping.

Read more: Brauchli responds to WSJ-NYT feud

Previously: Keller’s Letter To Award Committee Comes To Light, Journal Responds

D-Day At NYT, More Info Emerges On Buyouts

nyt logo.jpgToday is the deadline for New York Times staffers to accept or reject the buyout offers that went out in October. We’ve been keeping our ear to the ground for information about who has agreed to take the buyouts, just as last Friday executive editor Bill Keller asked staffers in a memo to reconsider the offers in order to avoid more layoffs at the company later this month. The paper has to cut about 100 staffers before the end of the year, but Keller said in the memo he was “almost certain the number [of buyouts] will fall short of the 100 we need.”

There’s already news surfacing about those who have agreed to take buyouts. Politico‘s Michael Calderone says at least five D.C. reporters will be leaving the paper, Neil Lewis, Stephen Labaton, David Johnston, David Stout and, newly reported today, Edmund Andrews.

The New York Post‘s Keith Kelly also said veteran business reporter Geraldine Fabrikant and metro reporter Ralph Blumenthal would be among those taking the buyout. Today, The Business Insider reported that Louis Uchitelle, Alex Berenson and Jonathan Glater would also be leaving the Times.

Gawker has a longer, unconfirmed list here.

Know anyone we missed? Send us an email or leave a tip in the anonymous tip box at right.

The New York Times Buyout List –Gawker

Here Are The Four New York Times Biz Reporters Taking The Buyout Deal –The Business Insider

Previously: New York Times Staff Cuts May Come As Early As Next Week

New York Times Staff Cuts May Come As Early As Next Week

nyt2222.jpgKeith Kelly has some bad news for The New York Times employees today. The 100 or so newsroom staffers that Bill Keller said would have to be let go — either voluntarily or through layoffs — because of budget cuts, will finally learn their fates next week. And, only 50 employees have reportedly agreed to take the buyouts.

Those who haven’t might be in for a nasty surprise as early as next week when the paper seeks to trim 40 to 60 more from the staff, according to Kelly. Copy editors are going to be hit especially hard, one inside staffer told the New York Post reporter, which is a shame because if there’s one things newspapers need today, it’s more typos. Sports and metro sections will also likely suffer deep losses.

Of those who have chosen to take buyouts, veteran business reporter Geraldine Fabrikant is believed to be part of the ranks. Politico‘s Michael Calderone also says that four vets from the Times Washington, D.C. bureau have agreed to the buyouts: Neil Lewis, Stephen Labaton, David Johnston and David Stout.

Read More: Cuts mean tears at Times next weekNew York Post

Previously: Memo: Times To Layoff 100 Newsroom Staffers, Two Times D.C. Reporters To Take Buyouts

Stephanopoulos Offered “GMA” Anchor Spot|Town & Country Tries Something New|NYT Reporter Speaks Out On New WH Pool Members|Another Buyer For Worcester Paper|Boston Globe Union Ousts Prez

TVNewser: The Washington Post reports that George Stephanopoulos has been offered the co-anchor position on “Good Morning America” to replace Diane Sawyer as she leaves for “World News.”

WWD: In the midst of a recession that has hit the high-end advertising market pretty hard, luxury pub Town & Country has plans to make its content more “exuberant” and “provocative” (read: sexy). Sex sells, but will it help boost ad sales?

Politico: New York Times reporter Peter Baker criticized the addition of reporters from Talking Points Memo and The Huffington Post to the White House reporting pool. “This is really troubling,” Baker told Michael Calderone. “We’re blurring the line between news and punditry even further and opening ourselves to legitimate questions among readers about where the White House press corps gets its information.”

Worcester Telegram & Gazette: Billionaire Jeff Greene is making a bid for New York Times Co.-owned Worcester Telegram & Gazette. He’s now bidding for the Massachusetts paper against a local group led by Polar Beverages CEO Ralph D. Crowley Jr. and Harry T. Whitin, the recently retired editor of the T&G.

Boston Globe: Members of The Boston Globe‘s biggest union have ousted their president, Dan Totten, after finding him guilty of violating union bylaws during a two-day hearing.

Two Times D.C. Reporters To Take Buyouts

nyt logo.jpgAlthough we have a week before the deadline for the voluntary buyouts at The New York Times, some information about who is planning to take the deals are already starting to leak out.

Michael Calderone at Politico reports today that Washington, D.C.-based Times reporters Stephen Labaton and Neil Lewis are planning to take the buyouts.

Calderone reports that Labaton, a senior writer with 23 years of experience at the paper, doesn’t expect to work in journalism after leaving the Times. Lewis told his fellow staffers that his future plans involve teaching a course at Duke Law School while still writing obituaries for the Times on a contract basis and “exploring other writing opportunities,” according to Calderone.

The Times‘ executive editor Bill Keller announced last month that the paper needed to layoff 100 newsroom staffers and was seeking voluntary buyouts as the first phase of the job cuts. Employees were given 45 days to decide on the buyout offers, and we’re expecting more names of takers to start rolling in soon. Know anything? Send us an email or leave an anonymous tip in the box on the right.

NYT’s Labaton, Lewis taking buyouts –Politico

Previously: Memo: Times To Layoff 100 Newsroom Staffers

Observer Exec Editor Leaves To Join McGeveran Venture

observer.jpgTwo weeks after The New York Observer‘s top editor Tom McGeveran announced that he was leaving the paper at the end of the year to work on some mysterious new venture, the pub’s executive editor Josh Benson has said he will be leaving as well.

Politico reports that Benson will also be leaving The Observer by the end of the year to join McGeveran in his new project, although details about it remain unclear. (We can’t wait to find out what it is.)

As Michael Calderone points out, much of the old guard has changed at the Jared Kushner-owned paper this year, with longtime editor Peter Kaplan‘s departure in May and layoffs in June. Last week, Kushner named former Portfolio editor Kyle Pope to the top editor spot, replacing McGeveran.

NYO exec editor Benson leaving –Politico

Earlier: Former Portfolio Editor To Lead Observer

Next Up On The Layoff Watch: AP

AP logo2.pngAs it works towards its goal of cutting payroll costs by 10 percent by the end of the year, the Associated Press is likely to cut staffers, reports Michael Calderone at Politico:

“‘As first outlined by President and CEO Tom Curley last November, the AP’s goal is to reduce payroll costs by 10 percent this year,’ spokesman Paul Colford said in a statement. ‘That goal remains in place and we are moving forward carefully to meet it.’

When asked about reducing staff, Colford acknowledged that layoffs were first raised as a possibility a year ago and remain a likelihood if the goal isn’t met.”

Calderone said that early estimates had predicted that as many as 400 employees would have to be cut in order for the AP to meet its goal. Around 100 veteran staffers have already taken the company’s buyout offer.

Update after the jump

Read more

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