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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Jackson’

Rating the New Richard Johnson Gossip

Where’s the first big scoop? That’s our question after keeping an eye on the initial efforts of former Page Six grand poobah Richard Johnson for Rupert Murdoch‘s The Daily.

With Johnson sitting shoulder-to-shoulder on the west coast with the likes of TMZ and Radar Online, it’s going to take more than tired rehashes of the Kim Kardashian-Prince stage dance story and bad Spider-Man Broadway reviews to make a mark. Another “Flash” item today about Adam Sandler snubbing print reporters at the red carpet premiere of Just Go with It is a real reach (it’s not unusual for A-listers to do only TV promo-ing), and like the other two tidbits, is anchored in New York.

Earlier this week, Johnson had a bit more luck when he looked at how estate lawyers are getting rich over bogus Michael Jackson lawsuits and shared the directorial aspirations of GEICO caveman commercial actor Ben Weber. Weber wants to make Heirloom, a personally relevant drama about Huntington’s disease

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Lawyer for Dr. Conrad Murray Describes Life in Media Bubble

TexasLawyer.com staff reporter Miriam Rozen has penned a commendable profile of Ed Chernoff (pictured), the Houston lawyer hired within 48 hours of Michael Jackson’s death in 2009 to defend the pop superstar’s controversial bedside provider Dr. Conrad Murray.

Because of the constant and expensive Houston-LA commuting brought on by the case, Chernoff decided last fall to rent an apartment in Hollywood. He says he has learned to no longer answer calls on his cell phone from numbers he does not recognize, because they are usually unwelcome media inquires. He also describes the impact of the media attention on his firm Stradely, Chernoff & Alford:

“We’ve handled lots of high-profile cases. It’s one thing when you have three cameras out there as you leave the courthouse. It is another when it’s 300,” Chernoff says.

Chernoff and partner Bill Stradley say Murray’s defense has taxed their firm’s time and resources; forced them to figure out how best to handle the deluge of media inquiries; and required major case-juggling among the five lawyers at the firm.

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Tourists Continue to Worship at Wrong Michael Jackson Shrine

It may be time for the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce to affix a disclaimer to the star of the other Michael Jackson.

Each time we stroll by the Walk of Fame star of former LA talk radio star Michael Jackson (pictured) at 1541 North Vine Street, we find ourselves having to explain to tourists that they are photographing the wrong MJ Terracotta temple. That star is a mile or so away in front of Grauman’s Chinese Theater, at 1627 Hollywood Boulevard.

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Elvis, Ruth 2010′s ‘Most Dangerous’ Autographs

Veracity has left the building. This according to Santa Ana based grading company Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA).

The firm says 2010 was another banner year for autograph forgeries, with roughly half of all received submissions from third-party purchasers turning out to be as real as last week’s Farmer’s Market Elvis sighting. Per PSA, the year’s “Ten Most Dangerous Autographs” of entertainment and historical figures are:

1- Elvis Presley
2- The Beatles
3- John F. Kennedy
4- Marilyn Monroe
5- Michael Jackson
6- Jim Morrison
7- Neil Armstrong
8- Jimi Hendrix
9- James Dean
10- Walt Disney

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The ‘Bad’ Old Days of Bubbles the Chimp

Even in death, Michael Jackson continues to haunt the media. There’s the controversy over his brand new posthumous single “Breaking News”, recorded in 2007 and – some Jacko fans claim – remixed and sweetened by one or more unnamed vocalists.

Now comes news of something even stranger – the auctioning of a two-piece “Bad” leather outfit ensemble originally designed for the singer’s pet chimp Bubbles (pictured). The item goes up for bid at Julien’s in Beverly Hills December 3rd-4th and is expected to fetch somewhere between $2,000 and $4,000.

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Some Mag Apps For iPad|Time‘s Hochstein To BusinessWeek|Passport Increases Frequency|Times Reporter Denied Access To Real Estate Gala|Sony Sues TV Guide Channel

min: Although Steve Jobs didn’t mention any magazine apps today during his iPad introduction, here are five magazine apps that would look pretty good on the new device.

New York Post: Another Time Inc. defection to Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Time magazine’s art director Arthur Hochstein has joined former Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel at the business magazine. BusinessWeek‘s former art director Andrew Horton departed last week.

Audience Development: Passport, the “hetero-friendly gay travel magazine,” is increasing its frequency and upping video coverage on its Web site.

The Observer: New York Times real estate reporter Christine Haughney won’t be attending this year‘s Real Estate Board of New York’s annual gala, and her negative coverage of last year’s event may be to blame.

Reuters: Sony is suing the TV Guide Channel over its use of Michael Jackson works aired during coverage of the singer’s death last year.

Time Names New Design Director

dwtime1.jpgOn New Year’s Eve day, Time magazine announced the promotion of D.W. Pine to the position of design director of the weekly magazine.

Pine will be replacing longtime art director Arthur Hochstein, who Pine had worked under as a deputy for nine years. In a memo to the staff, managing editor Richard Stengel praised Pine for his work for the magazine, including designing more than 30 covers, working as art director for the special Michael Jackson issue this summer and overseeing Time‘s “efforts on the new tablet digital platform.”

Pine, a former sportswriter, joined Time from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he was features design director, Stengel said.

“As a designer, he is always seeing around corners–and he gets more done in a day than anyone I know,” Stengel added. “D.W.’s work has a strong, clean, and spare esthetic and he has one of the great all-time Time temperaments: he’s never ruffled. He seems to come by this disposition naturally; his parents were subscribers who used to keep Time covers in a 3-ring binder.”

Hochstein, who Pine is replacing, was named art director in 1994 and had served under seven managing editors during his long career at Time. He is retiring but will continue to work for the magazine as a contributing designer.

Stengel’s full memo, after the jump

Related: Time‘s Stengel “Bullish” On E-Reader Content For 2010

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Remembering The Year That Was: FishbowlNY Editor On The Menu

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FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst visited the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast today, joining hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven to discuss the biggest media stories of 2009.

On Amanda’s list: stories about layoffs and magazine closings, but good news of circulation revenues climbing at places like The New York Times. Also, announcements of new magazine launches, like Afar and new Web sites, including Atlantic Wire, Mediaite and HollywoodLife.

Also discussed: the biggest stories of the year covered by the media — Balloon Boy, Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods among them — and how the media’s coverage has changed.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: In Memoriam

cronkite.jpgOur favorite part of any award show is the memorial montage commemorating the lives of all those who passed away in the past year. While this year’s headlines were populated by the tragic deaths of celebrities and other bold-faced names — from Michael Jackson and Farrah Fawcett to Patrick Swayze and Senator Ted Kennedy — our industry lost quite a few of its prominent members in 2009 as well. Here, a look back at some of the media’s brightest stars we said goodbye to this year:

Former anchorman Walter Cronkite was perhaps the biggest name in the media world to pass away in 2009, and he was honored by a star-studded memorial in September.

A number of famous columnists also left us without their prolific narratives about politics, celebrities and the English language in 2009. Conservative columnist Robert Novak died in August from a brain tumor, Vanity Fair‘s Dominick Dunne passed away later that month after a battle with bladder cancer. The New York Times‘ “On Language” columnist, William Safire, died in September from pancreatic cancer. Another columnist who we had the pleasure of working with last year, men’s wear expert Stan Gellers, died suddenly last winter, just a few months after the publication he had contributed to for more than 50 years, DNR, folded.

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David Carr Gives Us Reasons To Be Thankful

1260802225473_golf-digest-290.jpgWith a blizzard keeping us from joining our families this weekend, and this year’s almost-total dissolution of media jobs and funds, is there anything we can sit down and be grateful for once we finally gather around the hearth this holiday?

The New York Times‘ resident media guru David Carr seems to think so. Not only did online news orgs come into their own this year — with Twitter becoming a powerful, if flawed, tool for politics and journalism; Gawker hiring real journos for full-time jobs with benefits; and TheWrap.com breaking the biggest media merger story of the year with the Comcast-NBC deal — but, as the columnist wrote, “…black moved a lot of units this year. Just try to imagine this past year in media without President Obama, Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods.”

Sure, maybe the last example isn’t the most positive example of an African American in the national spotlight, but Carr’s point is that 2009 may have been the first year the MSM has focused its eye on more than the goings-on of rich, white men. Small steps, but as the end of this year approaches, we’ll take what we can get.

Read More: After a Year of Ruin, Some HopeNew York Times

Previously: Gawker Offers Writers Full-Time Employment, It’s Official: Comcast Acquires NBCU Stake

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