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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Liedtke’

AP Reporter Rewinds Netflix-Amazon Tale

It’s refreshing to see a journalist go beyond the boundaries of a typical book review.

Reporting about Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America’s Eyeballs, due in stores Thursday, AP technology writer Michael Liedtke wasn’t too sure about at least one of the tidbits passed on by author Gina Keating. So he decided to check it out:

According to the book, [Netflix co-founders] Reed Hastings and Marc Randolph flew to Seattle sometime in 1998 to meet with Amazon.com Inc. CEO Jeff Bezos. The topic of discussion: a possible partnership. At one point, Hastings proposed that Amazon buy Netflix, only to be disappointed when Bezos offered a mere $12 million.

Netflix spokesman Jonathan Friedland told The Associated Press that the Amazon anecdote was “totally untrue.” Amazon declined comment.

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Everyone Still Wary Of Murdoch’s Bing Deal

bing222.jpgThe big news right before Thanksgiving turned us all into sleepy zombies was Rupert Murdoch‘s plans to take all his News Corp. and Dow Jones business off of Google’s search engines, which were stealing all his lucky charms content.

Murdoch was so angry about the inability to make money off of Google’s Web traffic in fact, that he was hitting them where it hurts: by moving over to their competitor Microsoft’s new search engine, Bing. Would any other big papers follow suit? Michael Liedtke from The Associated Press (one of the other media companies flirting with the idea of moving to Bing) says it’s unlikely: Google still provides 21 percent of traffic to news sites, with Bing providing only 2 percent.

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