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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Sigman’

Former Publisher On The Firing Of LA Weekly Editor

Michael Sigman was publisher of the LA Weekly from 1990-2002. It was Sigman who originally hired Laurie Ochoa in 2001, and in a piece on today’s Huffington Post he reminisces about his time at the paper and questions the current ownership’s judgement:

The Weekly has cut way back on editorial spending for obvious reasons — the Internet, Craigslist, the recession — and by most accounts Laurie has done a brilliant job keeping the paper’s quality as high as possible under the circumstances.

Was “parting ways” with Laurie — a smart, sophisticated editor who knows L.A. like the back of her hand — a good idea, especially with no replacement in sight? (Ah, but they’re advertising for a new editor on Craigslist!) No. To paraphrase Freud, sometimes a mistake is just a mistake.

Previously on FBLA:
Editor-In-Chief Laurie Ochoa Leaving LA Weekly
LA Weekly Looking for a New Editor…On Craigslist
Media Criticism Via Facebook

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Michael Sigman Decries Newspaper, Magazine Layoffs

heagsdfgfddshot.jpgIt’s nothing we don’t already know, but given the layoffs announced this week at the LAT and the Orange County Register, it’s worth reading Michael Sigman‘s words in HuffPo:

Perpetual downsizing and loss of jobs are tragic in any industry, but there’s an extra dimension when it happens to our key sources of news reporting and analysis. On-line media are without a doubt transforming the way we communicate. But how can we hope to prevent future crises if we lose the daily and weekly newspapers and magazines which still produce most of the reporting that forms the backbone of good journalism?