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Posts Tagged ‘Michelle Obama’

Binkley on Cornejo’s Unconventional Styles

L.A. based Wall Street Journal style columnist Christina Binkley (pictured) checks in this week with another fantastic profile piece. Her latest subject is New York designer Maria Cornejo, whose work is regularly sourced by First Lady Michelle Obama. Cornejo’s firm, Zero + Maria Cornejo, recently expanded to L.A. with a store on Melrose Avenue.

A prominent part of Binkley’s weekly fashion musings is the way she deftly personalizes her article ledes. In this instance, she is writing from a mother-to-mother POV. Binkley has two children and her profile of Cornejo begins with a look at how the designer is intent on balancing the demands of fashion and family.

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FLOTUS in LA, Followed by Twitter

448px-Michelle_Obama_official_portrait_headshot.jpgFirst Lady Michelle Obama and her two daughters came to visit and left town yesterday. Pinks and a Lakers game. Apparently our local paparazzi are farmed out covering the latest panty-less pre/post-rehab disaster starlet and didn’t follow the wife of the leader of the free world. Instead they had just regular people on Twitter broadcasting their every move.

Which leads us to wonder, just WHO is Big Brother these days?

Social Media Week Panel Delves Into The Role Of Social Media Editors

SocialMediaWeekLogo.jpgSince it’s Social Media Week here in New York, we thought we would take a minute to highlight an interesting panel from yesterday afternoon.

Sister blog WebNewser was on the scene at the Time & Life building to hear former Fishbowler and current Mediaite editor Rachel Sklar, New York Times social media editor Jennifer Preston, and EW.com managing editor Cyndi Stivers talk about the role of social media editors in newsgathering organizations, on a panel moderated by Time Inc. director of community strategy for lifestyle digital Melissa Parrish.

Some choice insights from the panel included learning what your audience wants to read on your Twitter stream. Said Sklar:

“For Mediaite, it was different because we were a scrappy little start-up financed by Dan Abrams and whoever his private investors are, with a very small team — four of us. As soon as we launched, I became the unofficial PR Newsfeed of Mediaite.

I don’t have much of a filter in terms of the stuff I post.

I was responding to every single negative comment on my personal Twitter, and I started getting emails from people saying, ‘Whoa, you’ve got to back off a little bit.’”

Stivers agreed that news judgment is sometimes necessary:

“I think a lot of times people do forget about the user experience or think about it as an afterthought: Would I be annoyed if I had to click to another page and it was only three lines? Would I feel duped? Would I feel misrepresented?”

And Preston’s insight into how social media is used at the Times was very revealing:

“As journalists for The New York Times, trust is key. You have to make sure you’re providing as much real-time information as you can, but you have to verify it.

You do not join the Cindy McCain or Michelle Obama fan club on Facebook.

We’re not allowed to say “tweet” yet at The New York Times, but you can post to Twitter through TimesPeople.”

Read more: Social Media Editors On The Role Of Social Media Editors –WebNewser

Mediabistro Blog-Family Roundup

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• Google-owned blog Hot Girls removed their racist picture of Michelle Obama, though it still shows up in a Google search. -WebNewser

• You can now buy books you read about in The Washington Post with their new direct link system to Amazon.com -GalleyCat

• NBC affiliate channel 15 in PA Alabama has about the worst billboard in history. And of course it involves Twitter. – FishbowlLA

• The “Real World: DC” trailer looks positively…boring. We’ll tune in to see if Washington Post‘s Joe Curl makes out with any of his housemates -FishbowlDC

Will Twitter Be Time‘s Person Of The Year?

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Time Managing Editor Richard Stengel, Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravesnthal, Barbara Walters and Tom Colicchio. Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Time Inc.

Last night, Time magazine managing editor Richard Stengel hosted a distinguished panel of guests to debate the question that always surfaces around this time of year: who should be Time‘s Person of the Year?

Stengel co-moderated the good-natured debate with former New York City Mayor Rudy GiulianiTime‘s Person of the Year in 2001. Panelists like Barbara Walters were encouraged to bring lists of possible Person of the Year candidates who met the title’s criteria, which includes having a global impact in the past year, for better or worse.

After running through lists of possible Person of the Year winners that included Bernie Madoff, Captain “Sully” Sullenberger and the Iranian protesters, the six-person panel ended the night in a three-three split. Walters agreed with TV personality Dr. Mehmet Oz and Gayle King that “the guys from Twitter,” meaning Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, should take the prize. Giuliani, “Top Chef” judge Tom Colicchio and Pittsburgh mayor Luke Ravensthal all voted for “the economy,” settling on some amalgam of Ben Bernanke and the unemployed American worker as Person of the Year.

Stengel didn’t give any hints about who would end up the final winner later this year, but we’ll see in a few weeks when the Person of the Year issue hits newsstands.

Read on for more of the panel’s suggestions.

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Condé Nast Retreads On Familiar Obama Territory To Sell Copies

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A Michelle Obama Glamour cover for December? We know that coming up with new and original content for women’s magazines that doesn’t feel old hat is hard, but something about Condé Nast‘s special recognition award of Michelle Obama in their “Women Of The Year” issue feels a little bit like Barack Obama winning the Nobel Peace Prize: A little unwarranted.

We know that Obamas on the cover sell copies and win prizes, and Si Newhouse certainly needs that these days. Maybe he thought enough time had passed since all the other Michelle covers that Glamour‘s issue could be considered fresh all over again?

Below, a partial gallery of Michelle covers in the last year.

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Prevention Features Michelle Obama As Pages Grow

prevention.jpgThe first lady will grace the cover of Prevention‘s upcoming November issue, on newsstands next week.

The issue features an exclusive interview with Michelle Obama, conducted by the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Liz Vaccariello. Keeping in line with the focus on the magazine, the interview is talks about health, exercise and well-being, with Obama revealing her number one health rule: give yourself permission to be happy. She also discusses her workout routine (she’s added in more stretching to help keep her flexible), her favorite and least favorite exercises, her skin care regimen and what it’s been like living with her mom.

She also gushes about her husband, the president:

“One of the things that attracted me to Barack was his emotional honesty. Right off the bat he said what he felt. There are no games with him — he is who he appears to be. I feel fortunate as a woman to have a husband who loves me and shows me in every way.”

And in addition to snagging a hugely coveted cover model, Prevention is also boasting an increase in pages in its November issue. The issue closed at 95 pages, a 1.4 percent increase from last year, publisher Mary Murcko said. This growth is certain to increase after the magazine beefed up its sales team last month.

Related: Prevention Expands Sales Team

Media Rivals Meet|Preliminary Mag Newsstand Sales Numbers Roll In|Another Look At Olbermann-O’Reilly Truce|Dan Rather Calls For Pres Commission On Media

TVNewser: Media rivals met at Columbia University to discuss the challenges of the industry.

WWD: Preliminary newsstand sales numbers are in for the first half of 2009 — and they’re not good. Just take a look at these women’s magazines numbers: In Style‘s single copy sales dropped 20 percent decline while Vogue reported a 2 percent decrease, although it got a lift for its March issue that featured Michelle Obama on the cover. Elle, Glamour and Marie Claire all dropped 12 percent Harper’s Bazaar and Vanity Fair saw decreases of 12.5 and 11 percent, respectively, Lucky is down 18 percent and Self dropped 9 percent. Official numbers from the Audit Bureau of Circulation will be out later this month.

New York Times: Brian Stelter revisits his story about the alleged truce between Keith Olbermann and Bill O’Reilly orchestrated by News Corp. and GE officials.

Washington Post: Dan Rather calls on President Barack Obama to form a commission to save the American news media. “This is a crisis that, with no exaggeration, threatens our democratic republic at its core,” Rather said. “But you won’t hear about it on your evening news, unless the message can be delivered in a way that corporate media have little choice but to report — such as, say, the findings of a presidential commission.

Video: Arianna Huffington makes a cameo appearance on the upcoming “Family Guy” spin-off “The Cleveland Show.”

Harper’s Brown Loves Making “A Fantastical Idea A Reality”

brown.png Harper’s Bazaar features and special projects director Laura Brown spoke with FishbowlNY contributor Diane Clehane for a “What Do You Do?” article on Mediabistro.com earlier this week.

The Australian editor and special judge on Bravo’s “Project Runway” spin-off “The Fashion Show” spoke about the challenges of her unique job including celebrity wrangling and conceptualizing the special features that get the magazine noticed, like last year’s photo feature with Tyra Banks as Michelle Obama.

Have favorite part of the job? “It’s basically being able to make what is seemingly an untenable idea or a fantastical idea a reality — to have a light bulb go on over your head like, ‘How about Tyra [Banks] as Michelle Obama?’ and then having that happen,” she said. “I feel like a little girl from Sydney when I do those things like, ‘Wow, look at that!’”

Getting into the details of how the Tyra/Michelle piece came about, Brown said:

“Obviously, the election was on everyone’s mind. I just said to [Tyra], ‘Why don’t we do this?’ We have one pop cultural icon who is paying homage to a woman who is about to become first lady and is clearly an icon herself.’ She got it straight away. She had no hesitation whatsoever. We shot this months before the election, and we imagined the White House with the family. If we get one point for prescience, we’ll take it…She was great. We got so much press. There were people who loved it — and then there were some people from Harvard who couldn’t believe we put a Harvard sweatshirt on Tyra and thought it was outrageous. I love doing that kind of stuff when you get a reaction from people. That’s the point — you don’t shoot stories to have them die.”

Read on for Brown’s take on which celebrities sell best today and some inspiring advice for magazine writers.

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The New Yorker on Bill Cunningham

2009_03_16_p154.jpgAs part of this week’s Style issue — featuring none other than Michelle Obama on the cover (David Brooks will no doubt be thrilled to note that the illustrated version of “thunder and and lightning” have been “put away”) — the New Yorker profiles the city’s original sartorialist Bill Cunningham, who is as much a staple of the Sunday Styles as the wedding announcements. (Also, this is sort of genius.)

The full article is only available to registered users (meaning! if you have a subscription you can access their digital reader online. Go here. Also, not that long ago we would have complained heartily about this, now it sort of just feels like practice). But here’s a taste…in case you were wondering how he decides on his colors.

A few summers ago, on upper Fifth Avenue, Bill Cunningham spotted a woman in her seventies, with a corona of laundry-detergent blue hair. Every day for a month after that, whenever he saw something cerulean or aqua or azure, he snapped a picture of it.

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