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Posts Tagged ‘music’

Shirley Halperin, Music Editor of THR, on Landing an Interview with Bieber

ShirleyHalperinShirley Halperin has seen it all. She’s been covering music since the mid-90s and has worked everywhere from US Weekly to The Los Angeles Times to where she is now, the sole music staffer for The Hollywood Reporter.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Halerpin talks about the difficulties of getting Justin Bieber to sit down for an interview, his changing physical appearance, and the importance of getting his story just right:

The one challenging thing about writing this piece is that there were so many different ways into it. There were literally six or seven completely different ledes, angles, focuses that I could have done. It was really coming up with the one that was most relevant for right now — that also appealed to [Janice Min, editorial director of THR] and our deputy editorial director, Mark Miller, and was also a really interesting read, [one] that felt exciting. But there were so many different ways to do that.

To read more about Halperin’s ascent from intern at High Times to music expert at THR, read: So What Do You Do, Shirley Halperin, Music Editor For The Hollywood Reporter?

 

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Pitchfork Founder on the Loss of Music Magazines

Way back in 1995, Ryan Schreiber was a high school graduate working as a record store clerk. Finding little on the Internet about indie music, he decided to start his own Web page and launched Pitchfork. With no publishing experience, the site eventually became the online authority on indie music, and nowadays a review there can make or break a career.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Schreiber discusses what the success of sites like his means for print music magazines.

“I think if you’re going to be able to do a print publication that works in 2013, it has to really take advantage of that format, and the things that that format offers that are much more difficult to execute on the Web are having really expansive, beautiful layouts for your articles and features and making it feel like a desirable object.”

He continued, “It used to be that when you picked up a music magazine in, like, the 90s there was all this cheap, chintzy content thrown in there and goofy sidebars and just sort of filler, almost. And it’s really just not an option anymore. I feel like if people are willing to make an investment in a music magazine — or in a magazine of any sort, currently — they want something that feels substantial and feels significant. It’s not a joke. It’s a real thing.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ryan Schreiber, Founder and CEO of Pitchfork?

Make The Band Of Writers at Filter

Sometimes pitching feels like auditioning for a seat in the high school cafeteria. Only the popular kids get the good bylines, right?

Not true at Filter. These  editors say all you have to do to break in is love good music and introduce yourself through email. Yep, that’s it.

“Be creative and show us who you are,” said Pat McGuire, the editor-in-chief. “You have to understand that there are so many people seeking similar positions that you have to make yourself stand out a little bit.”

McGuire added one piece of advice on getting your foot in Filter‘s door. “I have a sense of humor; everybody at Filter does. So entertain us. Make us remember you — without being unprofessional.”

To find out what to do once you have McGuire’s attention, check out How To Pitch: Filter.

Bill Werde: ‘iTunes’ Success Does Not Equal Billboard‘s Detriment’

The lifeblood of Billboard has always been its music charts, like the Hot 100 or Top 200 Albums. Yet, now that Apple has officially killed Tower Records, it’s easy to assume that the Billboard brand is suffering right along with physical album sales.

Not true, says editorial director Bill Werde. With conferences like its upcoming Country Music Summit and cover subjects that keep folks buzzing, Werde says his mag has been able to adapt (thrive, even) with the times.

“I think there’s some important differentiation between what iTunes does and what Billboard does,” @bwerde explained. “I think iTunes is great for measuring immediacy. If you wanna see just a quick thing, like someone was on Glee last night. [To see] how did that song do, the next morning you can go to the iTunes chart and see there was an immediate response.”

In the full video, Werde details more of Billboard‘s cover strategy and reveals whether  he’s Team Kim or Team Nicki.

You can also watch this video on YouTube.

Part 1: Billboard‘s Bill Werde: ‘If You’re Gonna Write About Music, You Better Love It’
Part 2: Billboard‘s Bill Werde Takes On Idol, Reality TV

 

Billboard‘s Bill Werde: ‘If You’re Gonna Write About Music, You Better Love It’

Think you’ve got it bad as a writer? Try being a music journalist when not one, but two of the industries you rely on are struggling.

“If you want a career writing about music, my advice to you would probably be medical school, maybe law,” joked Billboard editorial director Bill Werde in our @MediaBeat interview. “Music journalism was one of the hardest hit forms of journalism, I think, because once upon a time, you really needed a critic to tell you if you wanted to spend money on an album… Obviously today, you can hear everything all the time, usually even before it’s released.”

Watch the full interview for @bwerde‘s tips on scoring that Beyonce byline, and to find out why the  Kanyes of the world are making his job (and Matt Lauer‘s) just a tad more, well, interesting.

You can also watch this video on YouTube.

Part 2: Billboard‘s Bill Werde Takes On Idol, Reality TV
Part 3: Bill Werde: ‘iTunes’ Success Does Not Equal Billboard‘s Detriment’

Fast Society Lands “Sick” Sponsorship Deal with CMJ Festival

Fast Society, the bootstrapped mobile group messaging service whose dev team took potshots at rival GroupMe last week, made good use of it’s personal connections, and landed it’s first big sponsorship deal with the CMJ Music Festival in New York City.

With an anticipated 500,000 attendees, the CMJ Music Marathon and Film Festival should give the Fast Society startup its first mass-user test. Fast Society was designed with time-limited events in-mind, according to co-founder Matthew Rosenberg, and allows users to create SMS messaging and conference calling groups with expiration dates. The CMJ festival lasts through October 23rd.

Fast Society poked fun at venture-backed competitor GroupMe at the New York Tech Meetup last Wednesday, when the two of them presented back-to-back demos.

As part of the partnership, Fast Society users will be able to access a CMJ concert schedule and maps to different venues around the city. When asked how his unfunded startup could get such a sweet sponsorship deal, Rosenberg pointed out the team’s personal connections to the CMJ community.

“We hustle our faces off. We made a sick deal for placement that was dirt cheap because we made the right friends. We are throwing sick parties because we made the right friends. We are on the ground working hard everyday because we are New Yorkers, and that is what New Yorkers do,” he said, according to TechCrunch.