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Posts Tagged ‘National Journal’

Complex Names CRO, National Journal Promotes One

A couple Revolving Door items to note today, involving Complex and National Journal. Details are below.

    • Moksha Fitzgibbons has been promoted to chief revenue officer of Complex Media. Fitzgibbons has been with the company since 2006, most recently as executive VP. He previously worked for Complex from 2002 to 2005, before taking on a year-long role at Stuff.
    • National Journal has promoted Johanna Derlega to senior vice president, National Journal Live and advertising. She joined NJ last year.

 

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Apple to Buy Beats | Time Inc. Spin-off Set | House Questions Comcast Merger

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Apple in Talks for $3.2 Billion Beats Deal (Financial Times)
Apple is closing in on its largest ever acquisition with the planned $3.2 billion purchase of Beats Electronics, the headphone maker and music streaming operator founded by music producer Jimmy Iovine and the hip-hop star Dr. Dre. The deal could be announced as early as next week, people familiar with the negotiations said, but they cautioned that some details had yet to be agreed upon and talks could still fall apart. GigaOM While Beats Electronics is best known for its premium headphones, it launched a streaming music service, Beats Music, in January. According to the report, the streaming service would be included in the deal. Apple runs its own streaming music service, iTunes Radio. NYT / DealBook For Apple, whose revenue growth has slowed sharply in the last few years, the deal could point to a headlong move into the frontier of streaming music. iTunes Radio has been slow to enter the streaming world. At over $3 billion, the Beats acquisition would be a major departure for Apple, which under Steve Jobs favored smaller deals. CNET Beats Music debuted with a powerful billing and marketing partnership with AT&T and it has reportedly been growing quickly. Although the company has yet to disclose hard and fast subscriber numbers, industry estimates peg the total at about 200,000. The talks come as trends in music purchasing are shifting to subscription services. Data from the Recording Industry Association of America found that paid subscription services grew the fastest of all digital formats last year, rising to 57 percent, while revenues from permanent digital downloads that are iTunes’ specialty declined 1 percent. Mashable Apple has ramped up its pace of acquisitions in recent months. CEO Tim Cook has said in the past that he’s open to the idea of making 10-figure acquisitions. Apple stock was down by a little less than 0.5 percent in after-hours trading following the report.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Letterman to Retire | Mozilla’s Eich Resigns | Fusion’s TV First

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David Letterman to Leave Late Show (TVNewser)
During the taping of Thursday’s Late Show, David Letterman announced next year will be his last on the show he’s hosted for more than two decades. The news was first reported on Twitter by R.E.M. bassist Mike Mills, a guest on the show, just after 4 p.m. ET. Letterman, who turns 67 next week, signed a contract extension in October. Adweek The duration of the new deal seemed a sure sign that the clock was ticking on Letterman’s late night tenure. Two years prior to signing the extension, the host had agreed to a two-year deal. NYT Letterman said he had informed CBS president Leslie Moonves of his intention to step down from The Late Show at the end of his current contract, which has about 16 months left. A specific end date has not yet been set. Letterman is considered by many to be the most original voice in the late-night format, and Moonves has been steadfast in his assurances in recent years that he would never ask Letterman to retire, saying at one point, “You don’t do that to a television legend.” Mashable Letterman hosted Late Night on NBC from 1982 to 1993 before starting Late Show on CBS in 1993. In 2013, he surpassed Johnny Carson as the longest-running late night talk show host in television history. He has been part of more than 6,000 late-night broadcasts. USA Today It’s unclear how CBS will replace Letterman, and when, precisely. Craig Ferguson, who hosts the Letterman-produced Late Late Show, is not being considered as a replacement, insiders say, even though his contract technically promises it. Moonves is known to have been interested in The Daily Show‘s Jon Stewart over the years, but in the past Stewart has said he is not interested in a network talk show. Stewart’s Comedy Central partner Stephen Colbert is seen as a more likely candidate, and is available sooner: His contract with Comedy Central expires in December, though Stewart is free in 2015. Chelsea Handler also announced plans to leave her late-night E! show this year.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek Controversy | Mexico Moves on Telco | NJ President Out

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newsweek bitcoin

Controversy Marks Newsweek’s Comeback (The Associated Press)
A mystery man. A splashy reveal. A media frenzy. Newsweek staked its return from the dead Friday on a story it knew would get attention. A cover story claiming it had uncovered “the face behind Bitcoin,” the world’s most popular digital currency. Twenty-four hours after identifying Bitcoin’s creator as a 64-year-old former defense contractor employee living in Los Angeles, the controversy over whether or not Newsweek had outed the right man was so furious that Newsweek reporter Leah McGrath Goodman made the rounds on Bloomberg TV and CBS Morning News to defend her reporting against Dorian Nakamoto’s denials that he is the father of Bitcoin. Mashable For the first few hours after the article was published online Thursday, Newsweek enjoyed the kind of attention that most publications would kill for. The Bitcoin story dominated the conversation on social media; 700,000 readers had viewed it as of 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. It went on to top 1 million views. FishbowlNY Within the first few hours of the story’s release, however, Nakamoto emerged to deny any involvement with the digital currency, prompting a media frenzy. In a two-hour interview with the AP Thursday, Nakamoto denied having any involvement in Bitcoin, and the only reason he had ever heard of it was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son three weeks ago. Nakamoto also said that during a brief interview at his home, McGrath Goodman misunderstood him (English isn’t Nakamoto’s first language). Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The account that created Bitcoin in 2009 has also suggested that the Newsweek story is inaccurate: “I’m not Dorian Nakamoto,” said the account holder, whose online name is Satoshi Nakamoto, according to USA Today. Newsweek In a statement released Friday, Newsweek defended the story: “Goodman’s research was conducted under the same high editorial and ethical standards that have guided Newsweek for more than 80 years. Newsweek stands strongly behind Goodman and her article”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Disney Cuts 700 | FCC vs Shared Stations | Tribune Names CEO

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Disney Interactive Lays Off Roughly 700 (THR)
The Walt Disney Company has laid off approximately 700 employees at Disney Interactive, a company spokesperson confirmed. Prior to the layoffs, roughly 2,800 employees worked at the division, representing a cut of approximately 26 percent of its total workforce. Variety Cuts were expected, but not on this scale. They were anticipated to mostly affect Disney’s Playdom group, which produces games for social media platforms. A Disney rep said the layoffs will occur across the board in the business unit. Re/code Last month, Disney Interactive reported its second consecutive quarter of profitability after a long string of losses, credited to the success of Disney’s console game Disney Infinity. However, in tandem with the layoffs, the company will cease in-house console game development beyond supporting Infinity and publishing the as-yet-unreleased game Fantasia: Music Evolved, developed by Harmonix. New Disney games will instead be licensed out and developed by other studios. NYT Disney Interactive makes up a tiny piece of the Disney empire. The entertainment conglomerate as a whole had $1.84 billion in profit and $12.31 billion in revenue in its most recent quarter; Disney Interactive had operating income of $55 million on revenue of $403 million, according to financial filings. Reuters Disney’s games and online division has for years been a persistent money loser and a small but significant drag on a corporate empire that spans movie-making and television to cable network ESPN, theme parks and cruise lines. Last year, Disney Interactive lost $87 million as revenues rose 26 percent from 2012; the division has lost a total in recent years of more than $1 billion.

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Tim Grieve Named NationalJournal.com Editor

Tim Grieve is joining National Journal as editor of nationaljournal.com. Grieve comes to the magazine from Politico, where he most recently served as a managing editor. Grieve had been with Politico since 2008.

“Tim is one of Washington’s most accomplished journalists and digital innovators,” said NJ’s president, Bruce Gottlieb, in a statement.  ”We are thrilled that he will spend the next chapter of his career here, delivering National Journal’s trusted voice on politics and policy to engaged citizens across the nation.”

Former Condé Exec Joins National Journal

Jessica Perry has been named Digital Vice President and General Manager of Atlantic Media’s National Journal Group. Perry has been working for the past year as a consultant. Prior to that she was Vice President of Product Planning and Operations at Condé Nast for three years.

PaidContent reports that Perry will occupy a new role at National Journal. Previously Scott Havens oversaw the digital operations, but he was promoted in January.

Marc Ambinder Departs Atlantic Media

Marc Ambinder, a White House Correspondent for the National Journal and Contributing Editor for The Atlantic, is taking “a pause from daily journalism” and departing Atlantic Media to work on other projects. Ambinder tweeted earlier, “So I’m taking a bit of a pause from daily journalism, leaving the superlative @nationaljournal on Dec 31. It’s all good. & I’ll still Tweet.”

Politico reports that Ron Fournier, the Editor-in-Chief of the National Journal, wrote in a memo that he was hopeful Ambinder would return one day.

“I walked away from journalism once and came back,” said Fournier. “It’s my hope that Marc returns to the cause soon, but that is selfish of me. What we all really want is for Marc and his family to be healthy and happy regardless of the path he chooses.”

The National Journal Names New President

Andy Sareyan has been named the National Journal’s new President. The New York Post reports that he will also be an Executive Vice President of parent Atlantic Media Group.

Sareyan was most recently with Meredith as President of Consumer Brands at Meredith. Prior to that he worked at Time Inc. as Publisher of Real Simple.

Changes At Atlantic Media: Research Co. Sold, Justin Smith Named President

SmithJustin.jpgDavid Bradley, the chairman of Atlantic Media Co., announced some big changes to his Washington, D.C.-based company today.

Emphasizing his focus on media, Bradley announced that he is selling his stake in the investor research firm he founded in 2008, Potomac Research Group. Bradley is passing PRG to Suzanne Clark, who has been serving as president of Atlantic Media’s National Journal for three years. Clark, who founded PRG with Bradley, will become the company’s CEO next month.

“Only the chance to grow my own company could influence me to leave my exceptional colleagues at Atlantic Media,” Clark said. “I am exceedingly grateful to David for providing this unique entrepreneurial opportunity.”

Justin Smith, previously the president of Atlantic Consumer Media overseeing The Atlantic and its related entities, will now be taking on Clark’s responsibilities as well as president of Atlantic Media. Explained the company:

“Smith will now add to his responsibilities oversight of the National Journal and Government Executive Groups — including the industry-leading National Journal, CongressDaily, The Hotline and Government Executive publications.”

Full release announcing Smith’s promotion, after the jump

Previously: Atlantic Media Scoops Up Reuters.com Editor For Digital Project

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