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Posts Tagged ‘Newsweek’

A Journalism Teacher Blessed with ‘Effortless Eloquence’

UniversityofHoustonLogoEarlier this month, at the criminally young age of 34, University of Houston journalism professor Jemimah Noonoo passed away. Before committing to the classroom, she had worked for Newsweek, the New York Times and the Houston Chronicle.

Cara Smith, editor-in-chief of UH student newspaper The Daily Cougar, took Noonoo’s class during her freshman 2013-14 year. Over the weekend, she remembered the many great qualities of her teacher and how the course very playfully ended:

On the last day of class, the last day I saw her, Ms. Noonoo had us do a “mock” twenty-year reunion.

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Reporter Reads and Replies to Every Single PR Pitch

ZachSchonfeldGraphicIf the ONA handed out Purple Hearts, Newsweek‘s Zach Schonfeld would surely be in the running in that category for 2014.

Per a hilarious essay, Schonfeld shares the ten ground rules for his August 30-September 5 experiment of reading and replying to every single emailed PR pitch. He summarizes his subsequent experiences in the form of a diary, including where applicable a ‘Weirdest PR excerpt of the day.’ Here’s two of our favorites from that honor roll:

Weirdest PR excerpt of the day: “Tori [Spelling], Dean [McDermott] and the kids posed for photos with their favorite Snackeez colors, while Tori and Dean told everyone about their love of the product.”

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Journalist Revisits a Celebrity Biographer’s Fraudulent Ways

The late author’s editor would not talk to reporter David Cay Johnston. Neither would Simon & Schuster spokesperson Paul Olewski.

NewsweekCover_0905_2014

But there it is, nonetheless, detailed in the latest issue of Newsweek magazine. The litany of errors and fabrication committed by celebrity biographer C. David Heymann, who passed away two years ago in New York City:

It’s too bad CBS didn’t want to hear more, because all the celebrity bios Heymann wrote for them and other publishers — dealing with JFK, Bobby Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe — are riddled with errors and fabrications. An exhaustive cataloging of those mistakes would fill a book, so a sampling from his long career will have to suffice.

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How James Brown Helped a Fledgling Reporter Turn It Loose

ShutterstockJamesBrownThe day before James Brown answered the door at his home in Beech Island, South Carolina in the summer of 2003, reporter Karen Fragala Smith had valiantly rustled up bus fare. From her Huffington Post blog item:

I had withdrawn the last hundred bucks from my checking account and boarded a Greyhound bus for Augusta, Georgia, just over the state line from Beech Island. I was in town to interview James Brown for Newsweek magazine.

Well, sort of. I was an editorial assistant who spent most of my time arranging travel accommodations for the director of the foreign language editions, and making photocopies for an elderly editor who found both the technology of a copy machine and the fact that women in the office weren’t just secretaries anymore, to be equally confounding. I was eager to do something that resembled journalism.

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A Journalism Career That Started in the Toilet

TheParisHeraldCoverThose were the days… After getting out of the Army in 1960 and setting his sights on journalism, James Oliver Goldsborough enrolled in law school at UC Berkeley.

Then, per a write-up today in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette by Marylynne Pitz, this happened:

An Army buddy called from Daly City, just south of San Francisco, with great news. “We’‍ve just fired the assistant managing editor for drinking in the toilet. Would you like to try out?” his friend asked.

After a six-month stint in Daly City, Goldsborough moved to the San Francisco Examiner, where he was a cub reporter.

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Birthday Boy Tom Cruise Doing Better Than Newsweek

ShutterstockTomCruiseNMUnintentionally, D.B. Hebbard over at Talking New Media may wind up with today’s most original Tom Cruise born-on-the-third-of-July reference. Leading off a piece about Newsweek, the journalist writes:

The newsweekly is like Tom Cruise in Interview with the Vampire, it may still be alive, but it is not looking very good. At least that is what users of the digital edition are telling the publisher.

Well done. But what of the more conventional coverage today of an A-lister who belies the fact that he is on the Edge of Early Bird Specials?

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Cover Battle: Newsweek or V

Welcome back to another edition of FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This round features Newsweek taking on V. For its latest cover, Newsweek features an illustration of George H.W. Bush and the Bush boys — George W. and Jeb — in a mock Game of Thrones scene. We’re just glad there’s no nudity.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Angelou Dies at 86 | Williams Interviews Snowden | Amazon Talks Hatchette Dispute

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Medal of Freedom Recipient Maya Angelou Dies at 86 (FishbowlDC)
Poet and author Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86, according to her literary agent Helen Brann. Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor — the Medal of Freedom — in 2011 from President Obama, and is most widely known for her award-winning memoir I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. NYT The cause of death was not immediately known, but Brann said Angelou had been frail for some time and had heart problems. GalleyCat In addition to writing, Angelou proved to be an accomplished Renaissance woman who worked as an activist, entertainer, streetcar conductor, magazine editor, college professor and lecturer. CNN Angelou’s legacy is twofold. She leaves behind a body of important artistic work that influenced several generations. But the 86-year-old was praised by those who knew her as a good person, a woman who pushed for justice and education and equality. In her full life, she wrote staggeringly beautiful poetry. She also wrote a cookbook and was nominated for a Tony. Reuters Literary and entertainment figures, politicians and fans mourned her passing on Wednesday. Obama said his sister, Maya, was named for the author, whom he called “a brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman.” Media mogul Oprah Winfrey, who frequently threw lavish birthday parties for Angelou and considered her a mentor, said she would remember her friend most for how she lived her life. “She moved through the world with unshakeable calm, confidence and a fierce grace,” Winfrey said.

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Mark Miller Resigns from The Hollywood Reporter

MarkMillerTwitterProfilePicA year and a half after joining the surging Hollywood concern as deputy editorial director, former Newsweek-Daily Beast staffer Mark Miller has decided it’s time to move on. At press time, it’s unclear whether Miller is transitioning to another job or taking a break.

Here’s the memo sent out today by Janice Min:

Dear Staff -

I know Mark announced his resignation in the edit meeting this morning, but with so many of us traveling today, I wanted to drop a quick note to make sure everyone on staff was aware.

In the coming days and weeks, [executive managing editor] Sudie [Redmond] and I will work to ensure all his duties and responsibilities are well-covered and cared for.

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Magazine Launches on Upswing

magazine stack GMagazines are alive and well, and the first few months of the year prove it. According to The New York Post, there were 45 magazines launched in the first quarter of this year, up from 27 a year ago.

Some of those debuts have been heavyweights — like Dr. Oz’s The Good Life, Capital New York and Branché, the popup title from Marie Claire — while some have been lightweights, such as the return of Sesame Street Magazine, which had folded in 2008.

“I was shocked when I put this together and saw the number [of launches],” MediaFinder’s president, Trish Hagood, told Crain’s New York. “So many of them are really solid publications.”

Newsweek also re-launched during the first quarter of this year, but uh, well… We think enough has been said about how that went.

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