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Posts Tagged ‘Peter Beinart’

Peter Beinart Leaves Daily Beast for Atlantic Media

Peter Beinart is leaving The Daily Beast for Atlantic Media, where he’ll serve as a contributing editor. His work will appear in The Atlantic, TheAtlantic.com and National Journal. He’ll also participate in Atlantic Live and National Journal Live events.

Beinart served as a senior political writer and editor of the Daily Beast’s Open Zion blog. He is an associate professor of journalism and political science at CUNY and a senior fellow at the New America Foundation. His work has appeared in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Financial Times.

Beinart will join Atlantic Media in January 2014.

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Bill Keller Thinks An Objective New York Times Would Be Boring

Bill Keller is enjoying his days among the New York Times’ Opinion pages because — as a human being — he has opinions. And as we all know, he’s never been too shy about saying his thoughts, and he did so last night during an interview with Peter Beinart, at CUNY’s Graduate Center.

Capital New York has a great breakdown of the entire chat, but we thought the best quote of the night from Keller was when he was asked if the Times could be objective:

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Journalists Say Internet Hurts

NSONYHC6_LARGE.JPGIt’s hard to read a survey like this and not conclude it’s a bit like carriage drivers saying cars are hurting the horse and buggy industry, nevertheless here it is. The Atlantic has polled 43 media insiders (Peter Beinart, Gloria Borger, Juan Williams, Fareed Zakaria, to name a few) and the majority of them (65%) feel the Internet has hurt journalism. Says one participant:

News consumption depends on news production, and I don’t see anything on the Internet that produces news — that is, detailed responsible empirical journalism — the way newspapers do (or did). It is typical of Americans to get more excited about consumption than about production.

It’s not all doom and gloom though, someone else said (and we’ll leave it to you to match responses to faces):”You abandon the conceit that ‘newspapers’ equals ‘news,’ you realize that people have far more information available to them about current events than ever before, and that’s a great thing for both journalism (the gathering of news) and the public.” Also? The Internet is here to stay. Full results can be found here.